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Sustainable water systems--Glen Daigger (President of International Water Association) presentation

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Presented during a seminar entitled "Water Infrastructure: Getting to a New, More Sustainable Standard" on June 15 at the World Bank

Presented during a seminar entitled "Water Infrastructure: Getting to a New, More Sustainable Standard" on June 15 at the World Bank

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • 1. Water Infrastructure: Getting to a New, More Sustainable Standard Glen T. Daigger, Ph.D., P.E., BCEE, NAE President, IWA Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, CH2M HILL Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
  • 2. Let’s Define the Problem(s) We are Trying to Solve Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Lack of Support for Urban Water Management Utilities Population Growth + Consumption + Urbanization + “ Linear System” Nutrient Dispersal = Water Stress Resource Consumption + + Integrated Water and Resource Management
  • 3. Population Growth in the 20 th Century Has Been Astounding! Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
  • 4. Population Growth is an Important But Not the Sole Driver Copyright © 2009 International Water Association < Water Treatment Plant Wastewater Treatment Plant Water Treatment Plant Wastewater Treatment Plant
  • 5. Scientists* Estimate That We Are Crossing Planetary Boundaries; New Technologies and Approaches Require to Return to Sustainabiltiy Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
    • Biodiversity Loss
    • Nutrients
      • Nitrogen
      • Phosphorus
    • Climate Change
    • Chemical Pollution (Not Yet Quantified)
    * Rockström, et al., Nature, 461|24 , September, 2009, 472-475.
  • 6. Coastal Hypoxic Zone “Hot Spots” Correlate with Human Population Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Diaz, R. J., et al. , “Spreading Dead Zones and Consequences for Marine Ecosystems,” Science , 321 , 926-929, 2008.
  • 7. Dramatic Urbanization is Occurring Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Daigger, Integrated Water and Resource Management for Improved Sustainability 1950 Data source: U.N. Population Division World Cities exceeding 5 million residents
  • 8. Dramatic Urbanization is Occurring Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Daigger, Integrated Water and Resource Management for Improved Sustainability 2000 Data source: U.N. Population Division World Cities exceeding 5 million residents
  • 9. Dramatic Urbanization is Occurring Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Daigger, Integrated Water and Resource Management for Improved Sustainability 2015 World Cities exceeding 5 million residents Data source: U.N. Population Division
  • 10. Global Water Crisis Caused by: Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
    • Population Growth
    • Increased Living Standard
    • Climate Change
    • Urbanization
    • Nearly Half of Human Population Will Experience Water Stress by 2025
  • 11. Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Can a System That Evolved: Be the Solution When: ● For Global Population < 2 Billion ● Mostly Rural ● Lacking Modern Technology ● Global Population ~ 10 Billion ● Mostly Urban ● Experiencing Greater Resource Constraints?
  • 12. Components of Integrated Urban Water and Resource Management System Include:
    • Water Conservation
    • Distributed Stormwater Management
      • Low Impact Development
      • Rainwater Harvesting
    • Distributed Water Treatment
    • Water Reclamation and Recycling
    • Heat Recovery
    • Organic Management for Energy Production
    • Nutrient Recovery
    • Source Separation
    Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
  • 13. Stormwater Can Contribute Significant Local Water Resource Copyright © 2009 International Water Association 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 2,000 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Captured Rainfall (mm/yr) L/capita-day 1,000/sq km 2,000/sq km 3,000/sq km 4,000/sq km Population Density
  • 14. Available Heat Energy Depends on Flow and Temperature Differential Copyright © 2009 International Water Association * 100 % Efficiency
  • 15. Wastewater Separation Creates Energy and Nutrient Recovery Options Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Uncontaminated Organic Matter Nutrients
  • 16. Toolkit Components Apply to Centralized and Decentralized (Hybrid) Systems Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Component Centralized Decentralized/Hybrid Stormwater  Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, Rain Gardens, etc. Water Conservation Wide Variety of Technologies, Along with Behavior Changes Treatment Treatment for Potable Use and Reuse (Direct and In-Direct) Treatment for Potable Use and Non-Potable Reuse Energy Management Anaerobic Digestion, Thermal, Microbial Fuel Cells Capture Heat Energy, Microbial Fuel Cells Nutrient Recovery Land Application of Biosolids, Struvite Precipitation  Source Separation Treatment of Kitchen, Black and Yellow Water Supply Potable and Non-Potable; Treatment of Kitchen, Black, and Yellow Water
  • 17. Let’s Look at an Example That Uses Only Local Water Resources Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Potable Water Supply (TYP) Potable Water Aquifer Non-Potable Supply Shallow Non-Potable Aquifer Industrial Water Supply Potable Water Supply Stormwater Infiltration Rainwater Harvesting Saline Water Aquifer Saline Water Export In-Building Recycling Wastewater Reclamation and Recharge
  • 18. Let’s Look at an Example That Maximizes Nutrient and Energy Recovery Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Non-Potable Supply Shallow Non-Potable Aquifer Industrial Water Supply Stormwater Infiltration Rainwater Harvesting In-Building Recycling Wastewater Reclamation and Recharge Heat Heat Potable Water Blackwater/Yellow Water
  • 19. Let’s Look at A Real World Example in a Surprising Location Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Decentralized Urban Water Reuse Battery Park City, New York Information and photos courtesy of E. Clerico, Alliance Environmental Decentralized Urban Water Reuse Battery Park City, New York
  • 20. Water Resources Managed On-Site to Mimic Natural Condition Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
  • 21. Water Reclamation Plant Located in Building Basement Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
  • 22. Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
    • Integrated Water Reuse Systems
    • Site 19B – Tribeca Green
    • Site 23 – 24 Millstein Properties
    • Site 18A and 18 B- The Solaire and The Verdesian
    • Site 16-17 – Riverhouse
    • Site 3 – Albanese Development
    • Site 2 – Millennium Point
    • The Helena – 57 th Street – Durst Development
    • One Bryant Park – 45 th Street Durst Development – Bank of America
  • 23. Eliminating Biases May Lead to Different Solutions Copyright © 2009 International Water Association Traditional Approach Revised Approach Water Supply What are the Available Surface and Ground Water Sources? What are the Available Sources of Reuse Water? Wastewater Management What are the Applicable Discharge Requirements? How Can the Effluent be Best Reuse?
  • 24. Transition to Sustainable Integrated Water and Resource Management Accelerated by:
    • Communicating Water Benefits to Community Served
    • Institutional Structures That Plan, Implement, and Manage Centralized and Decentralized Infrastructure
    • Performance-Based Regulatory Structures, Compared to Traditional Practice-Based Regulatory Structures
    • Revised Quality Standards:
      • “ Fit-for-Purpose” Water Quality Standards for Each Use
      • Eliminate Water Source Considerations
    • Global and Local “Forcing Functions”:
      • Decreased Water Supply
      • Increased Energy Prices
      • “ Carbon Tax”
      • Resource Constraints (i.e. Phosphorus)
      • Environmental Damage (i.e. Eutrophication)
    Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
  • 25. “ Legacy Systems” Must be Dealt With In Existing Urban Areas
    • Centralized Systems Serve Existing Development
    • Distributed Elements Aggressively Incorporated Into New Developments and Redevelopment
      • Allows System to be Converted Over Time
    • Existing Water Distribution and Wastewater Collection System Provides Necessary Capacity as Urban Density Increases
      • Avoids Need for System Expansion
      • May be “Downsized” Over Time and “Re-Purposed”
    • Centralized Plant Transitions From “Wastewater” to “Organic Matter” Processing Facility
    Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
  • 26. What Will These Systems Achieve (Why Would We Do This)?
    • Improved Public Health Protection
      • Greater Isolation and Potential for Treatment of Potable Water
    • Less Net Water Abstraction From Environment
    • Significantly Reduced Environmental Discharges
      • Volume (Stormwater, Wastewater)
      • Constituents (Organics, Nutrients, Compounds of Concern)
    • Reduced Resource Consumption (Energy, Chemicals)
    • Easier System Upgrade and Expansion
    • Increased System Resiliency
    • Enhanced Urban Environment
    Copyright © 2009 International Water Association
  • 27. Leadership is a Learned Skill*
    • Model the Way
      • Clarify Values
        • Find Your Voice
        • Affirm Shared Values
      • Set the Example
        • Personify the Shared Values
        • Teach Others to Model the Values
    • Inspire a Shared Vision
      • Envision the Future
        • Imagine the Possibilities
        • Find a Common Purpose
      • Enlist Others
        • Appeal to Common Ideals
        • Animate the Vision
    • Challenge the Process
      • Search for Opportunities
        • Seize the initiative
        • Exercise Outsight
      • Experiment and Take Risks
        • Generate Small Wins
        • Learn from Experience
    • Enable Others to Act
      • Foster Collaboration
        • Create a Climate of Trust
        • Facilitate Relationships
      • Strengthen Others
        • Enhance Self-Determination
        • Develop Competence and Confidence
    • Encourage the Heart
      • Recognize Contributions
        • Expect the Best
        • Personalize Recognition
      • Celebrate the Values and Victories
        • Create a Spirit of Community
        • Be Personally Involved
    • Be Credible
      • Honest
      • Forward-Looking
      • Inspiring
      • Competent
    Copyright © 2009 International Water Association * Kouzes & Posner, The Leadership Challenge, 4th Edition, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
  • 28. Water Infrastructure: Getting to a New, More Sustainable Standard Glen T. Daigger, Ph.D., P.E., BCEE, NAE President, IWA Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, CH2M HILL Copyright © 2009 International Water Association