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Innovative Interfaces: making the most of the data we have

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Overview of the changing face of the library OPAC

Overview of the changing face of the library OPAC

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  • 1. Innovative Interfaces Making the most of the data we have Winona Salesky | Digital Initiatives Librarian | The University of Vermont [email_address] | http:// cdi.uvm.edu / | http:// thedil.wordpress.com /
  • 2. What role does metadata have a in a web 2.0 world?
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5. More familiar sites
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8. Where does the library fit in?
    • “ Let’s face it — the obsession with which a library describes an item is second to none. ”
            • - Peter Murray Disruptive Library Technology Jester
            • http://dltj.org/2006/06/dis-ils/
  • 9. What does all that rich metadata look like to our users?
  • 10.  
  • 11. Limitations of traditional library interfaces
    • Lack scan-ability
    • Limited search functionality
    • Difficult to create complex search strings
    • Difficult to manage large results sets
    • Difficult to make connections between related materials
    • Does not take advantage inherent flexibility of digital formats and the extensive nature of the metadata
  • 12. Scan-ability
    • Creates a hierarchy of importance by:
      • Grouping related items together
      • Making important information look different
      • Making clear distinctions between items
      • Provide visual clues for site functionality
      • Paying attention to white space
  • 13.  
  • 14. Limited search functionality
    • No spell check, or spelling suggest
    • No stemming
    • Limited to no relevance ranking
    • Little or no ability to refine results set
  • 15. Additional limitations
    • Difficult to create complex search strings
    • Difficult to manage large results sets
    • Difficult to make connections between related materials
    • Does not take advantage inherent flexibility of digital formats and the extensive nature of the metadata
  • 16. Leveraging our metadata
  • 17. Facets Topic Format Temporal Author Genre Geographic Area Facet: One of the sides of a body that has numerous faces. -OED, online
  • 18. Some advantages of facets
    • Increased avenues for discovery
    • Allows users to easily “build” complex searches
    • Prevent empty results sets
    • Integrates keyword searching with browse-ability
    • Always a visible “path” so users never feel lost
    • Allows users to expand and narrow results set
    • Easier to explore the true extent of the collection
    • Recognition over recall
    • Easy to add new facets, categories, or items
  • 19. Some limitations of facets
    • Use of facets will make inconstancies in metadata obvious to users.
    • Some facets become unmanageable with large results sets.
    • Facets work better on some fields than others.
  • 20. Some examples:
      • Flamenco
        • http:// flamenco.berkeley.edu /
      • NCSU
        • http:// www.lib.ncsu.edu /catalog/
      • MyResearch Portal VuFind
        • http://research.library.villanova.edu/ http:// www.vufind.org /
      • WorldCat
        • http:// www.worldcat.org /
      • Scriblio
        • http:// lamson.wpopac.com /library/
      • UVM Center for Digital Initiatives
        • http:// cdi.uvm.edu /
  • 21.  
  • 22.  
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27. Something a little different
  • 28. An Innovative Interface
    • http://well-formed- data.net/experiments/elastic_lists /
  • 29. Other projects to keep an eye on:
    • Blacklight
      • University of Virginia
    • eXtensible Catalog
      • A University of Rochester/Mellon funded project
    • Evergreen
      • Open source ILS led by the Georgia Public Library Service
    • Koha
      • Open source ILS
    • LibraryThing for libraries
      • Providing tagging, reviews and more for integration with library catalogs.
    • AquaBrowser
      • A Medialab Solutions project
    • Primo
      • From Ex Libris
  • 30. Barriers to change
    • Inflexible vendor based systems
    • Non-transparent data formats
    • Data inconsistencies
    • Lack of technological expertise on a library-by-library basis
  • 31. Where to next?