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What is a city  - and whose city is it
 

What is a city - and whose city is it

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    What is a city  - and whose city is it What is a city - and whose city is it Presentation Transcript

    • What is a city — and whose city is
    • The city in its complete sense, then, is ageographic plexus, an economicorganization, an institutional process, atheater of social action, and an aestheticsymbol of collective unity. The city fostersart and is art; the city creates the theaterand is the theater. It is in the city, the city astheater, that man’s more purposiveactivities are focused, and workout, through conflicting and cooperatingpersonalities, events, groups, into moresignificant culminations.Lewis Mumford, ―What’s a City?‖ What is a city — and whose city is
    • The city in its complete sense, then, is ageographic plexus, an economicorganization, an institutional process, atheater of social action, and an aestheticsymbol of collective unity. The cityfosters art and is art; the city creates thetheater and is the theater. It is in thecity, the city as theater, that man’s morepurposive activities are focused, and workout, through conflicting and cooperatingpersonalities, events, groups, into moresignificant culminations.Lewis Mumford, ―What’s a City?‖ What is a city — and whose city is
    • For Sharon Zukin (author of The Cultures ofCities), the city is an aesthetic symbol ofcollective unity and collectivedivision, difference, ambiguity, conflict. What is a city — and whose city is
    • Cultural activities are supposed to lift [citydwellers] out of the mire of our everydaylives and into the sacred spaces ofritualized pleasures. Yet culture is also apowerful means of controlling cities. As asource of images and memories, itsymbolizes ―who belongs‖ in specificplaces.Sharon Zukin, ―What City? Whose City?‖ What is a city — and whose city is
    • In recent years, culture has also become amore explicit site of conflicts over socialdifferences and urban fears. Largenumbers of new immigrants and ethnicminories have put pressure on publicinstitutions . . . to deal with their individualdemands. . . . By creating policies andideologies of ―multiculturalism,‖ they haveforced public institutions to change.Sharon Zukin, ―What City? Whose City?‖ What is a city — and whose city is
    • [C]ity boosters increasingly compete fortourist dollars and financial investments bybolstering the city’s image as a center ofcultural innovation, includingrestaurants, avant gardeperformances, and architectural design.These cultural strategies of redevelopment.. . . often pit the self-interest of real estatedevelopers, politicians, and expansion-minded cultural institutions againstgrassroots pressure from localcommunities.Sharon Zukin, ―What City? Whose City?‖ What is a city — and whose city is
    • Building a city depends on how peoplecombine the traditional economic factors ofland, labor, and capital. But it also dependson how they manipulate symboliclanguages of exclusion and entitlement.The look and feel of cities reflect decisionsabout what – and who – should be visibleand what should not, on concepts of orderand disorder, and on uses of aestheticpower.Sharon Zukin, ―What City? Whose City?‖ What is a city — and whose city is
    • Questions to Ask • Who sponsors this space? With what purpose(s)? • How is that/those purpose/s embodied symbolically by the space? • Who is included in the space and who is excluded by it? How can you tell? • Specifically who uses this space? For what purpose(s)? Are there conflicts between different users’ purposes? Are there conflicts between users’ purposes and sponsors’ purposes? • In sum, what ―Denver‖ (or ―Denvers‖) is written into this space? And whose? What is a city — and whose city is