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Inventing with hypotheses (1)

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  • 1. Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133
  • 2. Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 Automobile 1 Automobile 1 was tested by assessing the damage done to a crash test dummy when the car was driven at 35 mph head on into a concrete barrier and when it was hit on the slide by a 3,000 lb. trolley moving at 35 mph. The test showed that, under these conditions, there is a 10% chance of life-threatening injury.
  • 3. Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 Automobile 2 Automobile 2 was tested by assessing the damage done to a human driver when the car was driven at 35 mph down a pleasant, traffic-free country lane surrounded by daisies and daffodils on a sunny day in May. The test showed that, under these conditions, there is a 0% chance of life-threatening injury.
  • 4. Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 What is a hypothesis? How do you test one? And why?
  • 5. Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 Rene Descartes
  • 6.
    • For example:
      • WRIT students will go on to achieve academic success, because they are very bright and very hardworking.
      • WRIT students will go on to achieve academic success, because I am the greatest teacher who ever lived.
    Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 hypothesis A hypothesis is an empirically falsifiable explanation of observable phenomena.
  • 7. Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 hypothesis Claim: WRIT students will go on to achieve academic success. A reason: Because they are very bright and very hardworking. A hypothesis is an argument: It is made up of (at least) two assertions: a debatable claim + a reason or reasons for believing the claim.
  • 8. Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 hypothesis A hypothesis is an argument: It is made up of (at least) two assertions: a debatable claim + a reason or reasons for believing the claim. Claim: WRIT students will go on to achieve academic success. A reason: Because I am the greatest teacher who ever lived.
  • 9.
    • These statements are falsifiable:
      • The sun will rise again tomorrow, because it (the sun) revolves from east to west around the earth.
      • The sun will rise again tomorrow, because the earth, which revolves around the sun, makes a complete easterly rotation on its axis once every 24 hours.
    Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 falsifiability To say that a hypothesis is falsifiable means that it can be shown to be false.
  • 10.
    • However, this statement is not falsifiable:
      • The sun will rise again tomorrow, because Mother Nature wills it.
    Inventing with hypotheses writ 1133 falsifiability To say that a hypothesis is falsifiable means that it can be shown to be false.
  • 11. Inventing with hypotheses Imagine that the computer had never been invented. How would higher education be better off, worse off, or otherwise different? writ 1133
  • 12. Inventing with hypotheses Imagine that the computer had never been invented. How would higher education be better off, worse off, or otherwise different? Why do you believe that? . . . writ 1133
  • 13. Inventing with hypotheses Imagine that the computer had never been invented. How would higher education be better off, worse off, or otherwise different? Why do you believe that? . . . How could you prove this? writ 1133

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