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Aristotle, the Rhetoric, Book I
 

Aristotle, the Rhetoric, Book I

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    Aristotle, the Rhetoric, Book I Aristotle, the Rhetoric, Book I Presentation Transcript

    • or Aristotle, Our Other Contemporary
    • R demonstration vs. persuasion
      • For Aristotle, unlike Plato, the pursuit of knowledge ≠ the pursuit of certain truth, or epistêmê . There’s also the pursuit of phronesis .
      • Phronesis or “practical wisdom:” The wisdom displayed in areas of human life such as ethics and politics. Concerns truths that are, by their very nature, uncertain, debatable, unknowable in any final sense.
      • Demonstration: To show a proposition to be true regardless of human judgment, belief, opinion, etc., e.g., The sum of the angles of a triangle is always 180 degrees.
      • Persuasion: To win the assent of an audience to a proposition that is, per definition, not susceptible to demonstration.
    • R demonstration vs. persuasion
      • Rhetoric, for Aristotle, is the art (or techne ) of persuasion is rhetoric.
      • The rhetor is thus a civic artist.
      • The civic arts: The ongoing debate whereby a community shapes, preserves, and changes itself, and without which it would disappear.
    • R enthymeme As melody and harmony are to the musical artist and color, line and mass to the visual one, so are enthymemes to the Aristotelian rhetorical artist. Argument: An assertion + evidence for believing it. Enthymeme: A combination of statements that explicitly makes an argument while implicitly evoking the worldview within which that argument makes sense.