Applied Materials Strategic Analysis Pdf
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Applied Materials Strategic Analysis Pdf

on

  • 2,893 views

An analysis on short-term and long-term strategies for Applied Materials and the solar industry

An analysis on short-term and long-term strategies for Applied Materials and the solar industry

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,893
Views on SlideShare
2,891
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
126
Comments
0

2 Embeds 2

http://www.lmodules.com 1
http://health.medicbd.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Applied Materials Strategic Analysis Pdf Applied Materials Strategic Analysis Pdf Document Transcript

  •   Applied Materials, Inc.  Strategic Analysis    Albert King, Seth Breedlove, Shayne Armstrong  5/11/2010         
  • TABLE OF CONTENT  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY................................................................................................................................................................... - 1 - COMPANY PROFILE ............................................................................................................................................................................- 1 - STRATEGIC INTENT AND MISSION ......................................................................................................................................................- 1 - PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION .................................................................................................................................................................- 1 - ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS: PERCEIVED TRENDS IN ADOPTING SOLAR POWER ...................................................... - 1 - SHAPING STRATEGY ...........................................................................................................................................................................- 1 - Scenario Analysis ......................................................................................................................................................................... - 2 - Scenario 1: “Sunny days are here again” ...................................................................................................................................................... - 2 - Scenario 2: “Running around in circles” ....................................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Scenario 3: “It’s as hot as hell in here” ......................................................................................................................................................... - 3 - External Environment .................................................................................................................................................................. - 4 - Competitive Rivalry ...................................................................................................................................................................................... - 4 - Threat of New Entrants ................................................................................................................................................................................. - 4 - Opportunities................................................................................................................................................................................................. - 4 - Threats .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... - 5 - Internal Environment ................................................................................................................................................................... - 6 - Resources, Processes, Values........................................................................................................................................................................ - 6 - Strengths ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... - 6 - Weaknesses ................................................................................................................................................................................................... - 7 - STRATEGIC ANALYSIS .................................................................................................................................................................... - 7 - IMAGINING MARKETS AND INDUSTRIES .............................................................................................................................................- 7 - CLEANTECH PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ...............................................................................................................................................- 9 - RECOMMENDATIONS ................................................................................................................................................................... - 12 - RECOMMENDATION 1: SHORT TERM OBJECTIVES ............................................................................................................................- 12 - RECOMMENDATION 2: LONG TERM OBJECTIVES ..............................................................................................................................- 13 - Political, Social and Competitive Implications:......................................................................................................................... - 15 - Political, Social and Competitive Implications:......................................................................................................................... - 16 - APPENDIX A..................................................................................................................................................................................... - 18 - TABLE 1 STAKEHOLDER, TRENDS AND UNCERTAINTY RELATIONSHIPS ...........................................................................................- 18 - APPENDIX B..................................................................................................................................................................................... - 19 - TABLE 2 SCENARIO MATRIX ...........................................................................................................................................................- 19 - BIBLIOGRAPHY .............................................................................................................................................................................. - 20 - END NOTES...................................................................................................................................................................................... - 22 -    
  • Executive Summary Company Profile  Applied  Materials,  Inc.  (AMAT)  was  founded  in  1967  and  is  the  global  leader  in  nano‐manufacturing  technology  solutions.  Applied  Materials  has  a  wide  portfolio  with  equipment,  service  and  software  products used in the fabrication of semiconductor chips, flat panel displays, solar photovoltaic, flexible  electronics and energy efficient glass. This report will focus the solar photovoltaic technology which turns  sunlight into clean electricity.   Strategic Intent and Mission  Applied Materials, Inc. has a vision of applying nano‐manufacturing to improve the way people live and a  mission  of  leading  the  nano‐manufacturing  technology  revolution.  The  stated  mission  for  Applied  Material  is  “To  lead  the  nano‐manufacturing  technology  revolution  with  innovations  that  transform  markets,  create  opportunities,  and  offer  a  cleaner,  brighter  future  to  people  around  the  world.” 1   The  organization is headquartered in Santa Clara, CA and has 13,000+ employees working to help make the  vision  and  goal  a  reality.    Applied  Material  is  a  global  organization  operating  in  92  locations  in  21  countries with manufacturing operations in China, Germany, Israel, Italy, Singapore, Switzerland, Taiwan,  and the United States 2 .  Based upon its mission and vision, and current operations, this study will show  that Applied Materials is in a great position to be an industry leader in the solar sector.  Problem Identification  Applied Materials has four problems it must address:  How can Applied Materials make solar panels more efficient and cost effective?  Which markets & products should it exit? (Red Oceans)  Which markets & products should it enter? (Blue Ocean)  How can Applied make solar panels more accessible to the general public?     Environmental Analysis: Perceived Trends in Adopting Solar Power Shaping Strategy The  prevailing  question  regarding  the  future  of  Applied  Material  relative  to  solar  energy  is  what  components and forces will end up shaping the industry in the future and how will Applied Material tap    ‐ 1 ‐
  • into  these  trends  and  forces  to  become  a  dominant  player  in  the  industry?  In  order  to  answer  this  question it is necessary to analyze the stakeholders, trends and uncertainties and attempt to predict how  they  will  interact  with  each  other.    From  this  information,  it  will  be  possible  to  define  the  potential  markets space of the future (both near term & long term), determine if AMAT should use head‐to‐head  combat or create partnerships in the competitive space and define the elements that AMAT should adopt  to shape uncertainties to its advantage.  As part of the analysis to determine the possible futures regarding the environmental, political &  social  spaces,  trends,  uncertainties  &  stakeholders  were  examined  in  a  round  table/brain  storming  session.  Table  1  &  2  in  the  Appendices  show  the  charts  that  were  developed  from  the  brainstorming  session. The most likely scenario, as determined by the Applied Material team and which will drive most  of  this  analysis,  will  be  the  optimistic  scenario  or  “Sunny  days  are  here  again.”  Following  the  scenario  analysis  will  be  an  examination  of  the  external  and  internal  environments  that  will  serve  to  define  the  future for the solar power industry.   Scenario Analysis Scenario 1: “Sunny days are here again” Solar  power  technologies  have  taken  a  step  function  leap  in  both  efficiency  and  cost;  the  new  solar  power  cells  have  achieved  at  least  80%  efficiency  and  the  cost  per  peak  watt  hour  is  below  $3.00.  In  addition, utility companies have completed their transition to smart grids that are able to effectively and  efficiently  utilize  solar  generated  power.  The  technology  has  also  become  plug  and  play,  so  for  little  money  and  easy  installation  most  home  and  buildings  can  purchase  and  install  solar  technologies.  At  least 65% of homes and businesses by 2025 are powered solely by solar power.    Furthermore,  there  is  excess  capacity  which,  along  with  equitable  and  mutually  beneficial  partnerships  with  China,  Europe  and  India  allows  the  US  to  export  solar  energy  overseas  through  underwater  power  transmission  lines.  New  technology  is  being  developed  to  package  the  power  wirelessly and transmit it overseas, but this technology is at least several decades away.  Both the states  and  federal  government  are  heavily  invested  in  green  tech,  especially  solar  because  of  the  promise  of    ‐ 2 ‐
  • energy independence and a prosperous economy. Even traditional enemies of green tech innovation— the oil companies, enthusiastically joined the band wagon.  Scenario 2: “Running around in circles” The  depression  of  2007  has  lasted  longer  than  expected  and  deflated  much  of  the  enthusiasm  around  solar  technology.  In  spite  of  the  signs  of  recovery  in  2009,  the  following  recession  lasted  several  more  years. Many companies have dismantled their solar power divisions and technological progress stalled.  The consumer has lost interest in the benefits of solar from both an environmentally responsible position  and  the  potential  economic  upside  because  unemployment  had  stayed  high  through  the  2010s.  Consumers are most interested in cheap energy, and the least expense source of energy is still oil.  However, the loss of enthusiasm & momentum for solar energy did not completely extinguish all  innovation, but the pace had slowed down significantly. Governments are still investing in green tech and  innovation  but  the  pace  of  progress  has  slowed  the  movement  toward  greater  efficiency  and  energy  costs. By 2015 the cost per peak hour will be at $6.50.  Scenario 3: “It’s as hot as hell in here” The intense resistance of oil companies and their proxies, including all the global warming deniers have  gained  a  victory.  The  U.S.  government  has  tilted  severely  to  the  right  and  all  funding  for  alternative  energy has dried‐up. Innovation is non‐existing and the U.S. public is more dependent on foreign oil than  ever. Corporations have abandoned any pretense at being concerned for environmental issues and are  working  hard  to  dismantle  any  environmental  protections  that  were  implemented  in  the  last  two‐ decades.  Over‐seas,  Europe  and  Asia  are  still  pursuing  alternative  energy  aggressively  because  the  climate change has wrecked havoc with their economies and rising water levels have devastated coastal  cities (the U.S. has suffered from severe storms and rising water levels, but the deniers in politics and the  media  has  been  able  to  distract  the  public  from  the  reality  of  global  warming).  However,  without  the  resources, and economic might of the U.S., progress has not been promising in finding viable alternative  energy sources.    ‐ 3 ‐
  • External Environment Competitive Rivalry Due to political pushes (e.g. defined renewable portfolio standards that require a percentage of energy  produced  to  be  from  renewable  sources 3 )  for  alternative  energy  sources  and  production,  the  solar  industry  is  very  competitive.  In  essence,  Applied  Materials  is  competing  on  two  fronts.  First,  it  is  competing  to  be  the  number  one  player  in  the  solar  industry.  Second,  it  is  competing  to  drive  solar  technology so it becomes the renewable source choice that replaces conventional energy sources.   Solar  energy  demand  has  grown  at  a  rate  of  30%  per  annum  for  the  past  fifteen  years. 4   Many  organizations see this and are investing in solar technology, resulting in more than 3,400 companies in  the  US  alone. 5   In  addition,  there  is  not  much  product  differentiation,  so  it  is  hard  for  one  particular  organization  to  come  out  as  a  leader.  However,  there  are  high  fixed  costs  involved  and  specialized  equipment  required,  indicating  that  larger  companies  will  prevail.  Applied  Materials  spends  over  $1  billion  dollars  on  R&D  in  2009,  a  competitive  advantage  over  smaller  less  funded  companies.    Overall,  competitive rivalry is high and will remain high as the industry continues to mature.  Threat of New Entrants Solar  panels  and  components  are  globally  sold  products,  and  the  push  towards  renewable  energy  solutions  makes  the  industry  attractive  to  potential  entrants.  Threat  of  new  entrants  can  also  be  seen  through  the  innovations  coming  out  of  the  industry;  such  as  engineered  viruses  which  cause  tobacco  plants  to  grow  solar  cells. 6   This  is  an  example  that  new  entrants  into  solar  technology  can  come  from  anywhere.  Taking  all  factors  into  consideration  and  the  evolution  of  the  energy  production  industry,  threat of new entrants is very high.  It is a possible outcome  that a start‐up  solar power company with  some V.C. backing, some good ideas and a clear business plan could become the next Google.  Opportunities The government funding and push towards alternative energy production has created an opportunity for  Applied  Materials.  In  addition  to  government  mandates,  environmental  concerns  are  influencing  the  general  public.  As  these  concerns  increase,  consumers  are  demanding  more  energy  sustainability  and    ‐ 4 ‐
  • one way to achieve this is via clean energy. Consumers are also pushing large corporations to be more  accountable  for  their  environmental  impacts,  so  AMAT  stands  to  benefit  if  it  can  partner  with  corporations  and  governments  to  be  the  dominant  player—of  course  it  also  needs  to  improve  the  technology and lower the cost.   Another opportunity is in the current solar industry, and the fact that there are so many players.  Applied Materials has the opportunity to either partner with other organizations to strengthen the solar  industry  as  a  whole,  or  purchase  smaller  competitors  with  potential  technology  that  could  help  AMAT  leap forward. Applied Material needs to take both these positions within clean energy to develop into a  key player in the industry.   Europe has been a leader in solar power production, and it is extremely competitive and may not  be  the  best  market  for  Applied  Materials  to  enter  at  this  time.  Asia,  however,  is  a  great  market  for  Applied Materials. In fact, the Asian market is larger than the European market and is expected to grow  at an annual rate of 20‐30%. 7  Applied Materials has been investing in the Asian market in recent year.  This investment needs to continue as this is a strong market.  Threats Applied Materials is a globally operating organization, so the current economic crisis is a serious threat.   For  example,  the  construction  market  in  the  U.S.  has  been  in  decline  since  2006.  Until  construction  begins  to  rebound,  investment  in  alternative  energy  will  be  threatened.  According  to  AMAT’s  website  Applied  Materials  derived  81%  of  its  sales  outside  of  the  US  in  FY2009,  66%  from  Asia  and  15%  from  Europe. 8  Moreover, the semiconductor industry had experienced a decline of 46.5% between 2008 and  2009. This decline has already adversely affected Applied Materials, and has caused it to focus more on  its  solar  operations  (industry  wide,  the  net  margin  on  semiconductor  chips  has  also  been  in  decline,  which has affected AMATs profit margin). 9   ‐ 5 ‐
  • Internal Environment Resources, Processes, Values Applied  Materials  is  a  large  company  with  a  lot  of  resources.  It  currently  has  13000+  employees  worldwide  and  revenues  of  $5  billion.  In  addition,  it  has  a  strong  R&D  foundation  with  a  budget  of  $1  billion.  However,  between  2007  and  2009  Applied  Materials  has  suffered  a  loss  of  revenue  of  approximately $2.7 billion.   Applied  Materials  also  has  low  debt  compared  to  its  cash,  cash  equivalents,  and  investments.  AMAT  continues  to  have  strong  financial  results  in  spite  of  the  challenges  posed  by  the  economic  downturn of the past several years. Furthermore, it has shown a growth in the last quarter of 2009 and  first quarter of 2010, indicating a turnaround of economic fortune.  According  to  its  website,  Applied  Materials  core  competencies  are  thin  film  engineering,  commercializing  sophisticated  systems,  and  global  reach. 10   Its  capabilities  in  semiconductors  and  flat  panels  have  led  to  innovations  such  as  the  cell  phones  and  more  recently  LCD  TV’s.  In  addition,  since  2006 it has also become a leader in solar photovoltaic (PV) panels and it is now the largest supplier of PV  solar equipment. Applied Materials has capably used their expertise in thin film and large glass substrate  processing to develop next generation solar panel technology.   Strengths Potentially, AMATs greatest strengths are its R&D department. It has R&D operations globally with the  largest non‐government research facility in the world located in Xian, China. In this location it focuses on  “…engineering, equipment demonstration, validation and training for both crystalline silicon and thin film  solar  equipment  and  processes.” 11   This  R&D  center  also  houses  its  SunFab  panel  reliability  testing  laboratory.   AMAT  also  has  global  reach.  It  is  able  to  source  and  leverage  equipment,  materials,  and  skills  from  around  the  world.  Furthermore,  the  operational  locations  where  AMAT  does  it  research  and  production  gives  this  company  access  to  customers  in  the  largest  and  fastest  growing  solar  markets  in    ‐ 6 ‐
  • the world‐‐ Asia and Europe.  As the U.S. solar market begins to mature, Applied Materials will be well  positioned to become a market leader.   Weaknesses AMAT’s  greatest  weakness  is  its  low  margins.  In  2009  its  margins  were  28.5%  which  was  down  from  42.4% in 2008. Low margins, and specifically declining margins, indicate a company is having a difficult  time controlling costs and could affect the financial performance of the company. 12 Strategic Analysis Imagining Markets and Industries  Identify the range of factors that the industry you have chosen competes on and invests in.  There are four factors that define competition and investments. The First factor is the technology itself.  Whether the platform is photovoltaic solar cells or concentrating solar power (use lenses or mirrors to  focus a large area of sunlight onto a small area) rapid innovation throughout out the industry is diffusing  investment sources. Investment is not only being directed towards the most viable technologies, but also  towards  the  most  promising  and  daring  technologies  such  as  biologically  engineered  plants.    A  second  factor  that  drives  the  industry  is  cost—both  in  manufacturing  and  in  purchase  cost  for  customers.  The  industry is still relatively new and as processes improve, prices will naturally decrease. Indeed, depending  on  the  source  of  information,  prices  have  already  declined  10‐50%  in  the  last  decade.    For  example,  iSuppli has claimed that crystalline module prices fell by 37.8% in 2009. 13  A third factor to consider are  standards:    being  a  relatively  young  industry,  standards  on  installation  and  performance  need  to  be  adopted. 14  The final factor affecting the solar industry is a qualified workforce. This is a young industry  that  has  yet  to  adopt  standards,  and  these  factors  make  it  hard  to  find  qualified  employees;  as  the  industry matures workers will have to do a lot of adjusting (in type of work, pay, working conditions, skill  set, etc.), which could be stressful for them and their organizations.    ‐ 7 ‐
  • Which of the factors that the industry takes for granted should be eliminated?  Many organizations are chasing photovoltaic technology and this technology will most likely win out as  one  of  the  leading  technologies.  Although  panels  are  not  as  efficient,  the  expectation  is  that  they  will  become as efficient as PV technology. That being stated, the solar power industry needs to be cautious of  “putting  all  their  eggs  in  one  basket.”  There  needs  to  be  on‐going  effort  to  diversify  investments  and  efforts  and  continue  research  into  other  types  of  platforms.  It  would  be  dangerous  for  the  industry  to  remained focus on current technologies and paradigms and necessary for them to continue to challenge  the  prevailing  norms.  An  example  may  be  the  effort  regarding  genetically  modified  tobacco  plants  to  create biological solar cells to create a new technology that could have a future application. Although this  may seem like a wild idea, this type of “thinking outside the box” and building strategies that challenge  current paradigms could push the industry toward real success in competing and making in‐roads against  establish energy sources.     Which factors should be reduced well below the industry’s standard?  The biggest factor affecting the industry, currently, is cost, and this needs to be reduced in order for the  industry  to  take‐off.  Organizations  are  improving  production  efficiencies  and  continually  challenging  costs.  Because  of  costs  only  large  customers  are  able  to  take  advantage  of  solar  power  (for  the  most  part), but when the price is low enough for individual households to afford the installation, the market  demand for solar power will dramatically increase.   Which factors should be raised well above the industry’s standard?  Installation  and  performance  standards  need  to  be  widely  adopted.  Consumers  currently  do  not  understand  the  difference  between  the  technologies  and  performance  levels  available,  and  do  not  understand  the  installation  process  required.  Part  of  the  reason  is  that  solar  installers  have  their  own  practices, so from a consumer stand point it is hard to know the ‘right way’. Furthermore, it’s hard for a  consumer  to  know  if  it  is  more  cost  effective  to  install  solar  panels;  until  installation  and  performance  standards are improved it may still be too much of a risk to convert to solar power, especially given the  high cost.    ‐ 8 ‐
  • Which factors should be created that the industry has never offered?  The  concept  behind  solar  energy  is  simple:  Solar  power  is  about  creating  electricity  from  a  renewable  source. However, converting solar energy to electricity is not always feasible (at night for example), and  although technology breakthroughs are emerging for harnessing energy in low light situations, it is still  not  readily  available.  Therefore,  creating  partnerships  with  other  renewable  energy  companies,  for  example,  from  the  wind  sector  could  prove  beneficial  for  all  involved.  Creating  a  solution  that  could  harness energy from multiple sources could further the push for renewable energy, and lower the costs  while increasing efficiency.  Based on your analysis, characterize the new market space that you have identified. Do you think this is a  viable space?  Creating  partnerships  with  other  renewable  energy  providers  to  combine  two  types  of  technologies  to  increase efficiency and lower costs is a possible new market space. In theory this is an excellent market  space  to  investigate;  but  because  the  emerging  and  established  renewable  energy  technologies  are  currently competing for space in the renewable energy universe and improvements in efficiency have a  long way to go to be widely adopted, it is uncertain which technologies and platforms will be the future  standard (and which technologies will co‐exist). The renewable energy sector is currently disjointed and  this is a function of the large amount of investments in this industry that drive innovation and forward  progress. Every platform of renewable energy are competing to be a dominant player in the industry and,  therefore,  it  may  be  too  soon  to  attempt  to  combine  different  sources  at  this  stage;    as  the  total  renewable  energy  field  matures  this  could  become  a  viable  option—  capitalize  on  the  benefits  of  different technologies.   Cleantech products and services  Identify three potential playing fields for a specific cleantech product/service.   One potential playing field for Applied Materials is to venture into financing solar panel installation—for  both  individuals  and  businesses.  This  is  an  expensive  technology  and  access  to  finance  could  be  a  deterrent for some potential customers. After some preliminary research, it does not appear that a lot of    ‐ 9 ‐
  • organizations are bridging the gap and providing financing for solar power installation. There are more  than 3,000 organizations in the solar industry, but it is hard to find industry supported financing sources  at the same level. It could be a matter of marketing and building consumer awareness about financing  options.   A second potential playing field is the installation of solar panels and not just the technology that  makes the panel’s work. This may not be in the core competence of Applied Material, but this is an area  that  could  take the company to the next level. Furthermore, working directly with  the end user would  allow Applied Material to better understand the needs of their customer base. This synergy could drive  more  focused  insight  and  this  could  lead  to  the  next  generation  in  solar  panel  technology.  In  addition,  Applied Materials would have a competitive advantage over other solar installers since Applied Material  has the capability to manufacturer its own panels.   A third potential playing field would be to study the market place and adapt the most promising  technologies  available  in  the  industry  (if  their  crystallize  Silicon  and  Flat  Panel  technologies  are  not  considered industry innovators after some internal soul searching). Applied Material could achieve leaps  in technology through the purchase of patents of next generation solar panel or the outright purchase of  companies  that  are  industry  innovator.  For  example,  Applied  Material  could  buy  entrée  into  next  gen  technology  by investing in the research to use genetically altered tobacco plant to produce solar cells 15 .  Although these studies are being conducted by universities such as MIT, Applied Material could become  an investor in this type of research. Ultimately, this technology may not be the future that plays out in  the industry, but it is a great opportunity for Applied Materials to be the leader in this field. In addition,  this  could  help  the  organization  reach  a  new  audience,  and  potentially  license  its  technological  breakthroughs. This could ultimately bring down the price of solar energy generation, and make it truly a  renewable  source.  While  pursuing  this  playing  field,  Applied  Materials  should  also  concentrate  on  improving the technology currently available.    ‐ 10 ‐
  • What barriers are likely to appear (especially consumer related)?  Consumers are aware of solar panels and believe they can save them money in the long term. However,  financing is another issue. Some organizations such as Clean Power Finance are trying to bridge the gap,  but  financing  in  this  area  is  still  relatively  new. 16 Another  barrier  is  the  number  of  renewable  energy  producers,  for  example,  wind  turbines  compete  for  the  same  customer.  The  efficiency  of  the  panels  themselves is another barrier, consumers need to invest a significant amount of money upfront and the  panels are only about 40% efficient.   If you were a firm that had key expertise in the cleantech product/service identified, what would your  suggested sequence of entry be?  The  first  thing  a  firm  should  do  is  build  market  awareness.  Many  consumers  do  not  understand  the  benefits of solar technology over other renewable energy sources. Furthermore, they do not realize that  there are finance options available, so easing the access to financing could help grow the consumer base.  In  addition,  AMAT  should  make  the  solar  equipment  more  affordable  by  limiting  the  margins  and  generate more revenue through interest earned on loans made to consumers.   Crafting Strategies to Stay Ahead  Applied Materials originally entered the solar industry through its acquisition of Applied Films in 2006. 17   Continuing to build its competencies in‐house will make Applied Materials stronger, but acquiring smaller  competitors when it makes sense to strengthen its market position should continue. It is also necessary  to develop a marketing space that serves to excite consumers (end user, businesses and organizations)  about the benefit and advantages of solar panels. If it does not enter the solar installation field, it would  be beneficial for Applied Materials to start collaborating with solar installation companies to strengthen  the  solar  panel  industry.  This  industry  is  competing  with  other  renewable  sources  and  collaboration  amongst players in solar could benefit them all.   Gaining Value from Knowledge Assets    Applied Materials is gaining knowledge in the solar industry through acquisitions of organizations such as  Advent Solar, but it is also gaining knowledge through its own operations. 18  The company has more than    ‐ 11 ‐
  • 7500 patents; this indicates that the business is driven by innovation. In addition to the patents, Applied  Materials has strong brand recognition for the quality and innovativeness of its product, which could be  an advantage as the solar industry progresses forward.  Recommendations Recommendation 1: Short Term Objectives Based on the current environment,  company strengths and weaknesses, and potentials playing  fields for the solar sector, AMAT has a lot of opportunities for future success. From a short term stand  point  there  are  a  number  of  activities  that  AMAT  should  enter  in  the  next  three  to  five;  the  revenues  generated from the short term strategic efforts could finance long term objectives. As mentioned there  are more than 3,000 organizations fighting for space within the solar sector which is likely (and already  has)  created  a  lot  of  confusion  for  customers  in  terms  of  standards.  Furthermore,  it  would  seem  that  with  so  many  players  in  the  industry  that  there  would  be  a  better  developed  financing  mechanism  to  aide  consumers  with  converting  to  solar.  Unfortunately,  the  availability  of  financing  options  is  scatter‐ shot at best and if there are viable financing mechanisms, the solar industry is not doing a good job at  informing the consumer of these options. This is important because it creates an opportunity for Applied  Materials  to  step  outside  its  current  playing  field  of  nano‐manufacturing,  R&D,  and  Solar  Panel  Manufacturing to growing market share through a robust effort to develop a financing service to drive  consumers to purchasing solar panel and other solar technology from AMAT.  In Addition, AMAT needs  to  leverage  their  current  effort  at  manufacturing  solar  panels  to  improve  the  technology  and  focus  on  efficiency and cost per panel (at the moment, AMAT’s cost per panel is $1.70/watt versus $1.50/watt for  SunSolar  and  $1.80/watt  for  leading  Chinese  manufacturers).  By  driving  down  costs  through  by  improving  their  manufacturing  processes  (and  given  that  AMAT  produces  their  own  manufacturing  technology  they  have  a  competitive  advantage)  AMAT  can  further  make  inroads  in  acquiring  a  bigger  piece of the solar panel pie.    ‐ 12 ‐
  • Applied  Materials  has  also  been  successful  at  acquiring  technology  and  technological  “know‐ how” through the acquisition of competitors. This is the avenue AMAT took in 2006 to enter the solar  industry.  Through acquisition of patents and companies, by providing financing for solar panels and by  improving their current solar panel technology in terms of efficiency and cost AMAT, in the short term,  would drive their growth in the solar panel business.   Recommendation 2: Long Term Objectives   Blue Ocean Strategies  The  solar  technology  in  which  AMAT  is  involved  such  as  solar  panel  and  thin‐film  is  being  seamlessly  integrated  in  the  construction  of  buildings  and  the  manufacturing  of  cars  that  may  be  surprising to the average consumer. An individual may be walking into a building with a clear glass roof  and  may  never  know  that  rooftop  is  generating  electricity,  the  neighbors  Latin  styled  shingles  may  actually be solar panels or a stadium in Japan may be using solar panels to generating electricity that is  capable of powering an entire neighborhood.   However,  the  industry  is  currently  saturated  with  solar  companies  and  all  are  developing  competing technologies that will most likely result in a challenging environment to implement standards  in installation, production, efficiency and compatibility—an industry shake‐out will be necessary. Because  of the fast pace in the industry and the rapidly technological transformations, Applied Materials needs to  adopt a ‘Blue Ocean’ strategy and must look beyond existing possibilities and envision the future of the  industry five years, ten years, and twenty years into the future and explore the potential synergies that  may evolve between cleantech such as solar and the construction & auto industries as an example.  In  order  to  this,  AMAT  needs  to  develop  mutually  beneficial  partnerships  with  companies  and  other  stakeholders  who  have  expertise  in  areas  outside  their  core  competencies  and  leverage  these  partnership and their R&D expertise to develop prototypes and concepts on how solar power technology  can be effectively and seamlessly integrated into buildings and vehicles.  The Chevy Volt is a good of a  platform that could serve as a starting point for this type of integrative research.     ‐ 13 ‐
  •     ‐ 14 ‐
  • Auto Industry  The  Chevy  Volts  MPV5  lithium  battery  technology  has  a  current  range  of  thirty‐two  miles  on  average.  On a full charge, the Chevy Volt Sedan can reach a range of forty miles without consuming any  gasoline.    Forty  miles  is  not  a  great  enough  range  to  meet  the  commuting  needs  of  75%  of  daily  commuters in the U.S. When the Volt switches to its small four‐cylinder gas powered engine which also  helps generate electricity to recharge the battery, the range of the Volt extends to over three‐hundred  miles  on  a  single  tank  of  gas.  19   In  addition,  there  are  other  all  electric  vehicles  that  are  capable  of  reaching  ranges  of  one‐hundred  miles  with  no  gas;  such  as  the  Nissan  Leaf  which  is  gas  optional  and  Telsa Motors which claim a range of two‐hundred‐thirty‐six‐miles with no gas. Another new development  is RORMaxx automotive, a vehicle that uses solar power to start the car, and then uses technology based  on airline jet engines to recapture twenty to twenty five percent of the expended energy via wind energy  for  immediate  use.      These  vehicle  technologies  have  experienced  rapid  improvements  in  the  past  five  years  because  of  the  increasing  demand  from  the  public  for  a  viable  alternative  to  the  traditional  gas‐ combustor engine. 20    Applied  Materials  should  seek  partnerships  with  companies  in  the  auto  industry  to  combine  technologies  such  as  clear  glass  solar  panels,  infrared  solar  panels  (produces  electricity  even  in  bad  weather or at night) and spray on solar panels.   Although these technologies are in their infancy, AMAT  should  form  joint  ventures  with  auto‐companies;  with  split  level  control  (Each  company  with  the  expertise controls the unit with the correlating technology with joint control on the corporate strategy  level).    With  the  combining  of  these  technologies,  we  could  see  vehicles  capable  of  going  well  beyond  current  ranges  without  the  aid  of  gasoline.  It  is  also  within  the  realm  of  possibility  to  develop  vehicles   using integrated technologies that would one day be one‐hundred percent energy independent.   Applied Materials should seek to partner or purchase with other smaller companies that have an  edge in these emerging technologies together with pursing partnerships with auto‐companies.   Political, Social and Competitive Implications:    Having the support of the auto industry (a major stakeholder) will also have a positive effect politically, as  those in the auto industry who may have lobbied in favor of the oil industry will now throw their efforts    ‐ 15 ‐
  • and  clout  behind  the  solar  industry.    AMAT  will  be  practicing  Judy  strategy  by  applying  the  puppy  dog  technique and not attracting attention of competitors.  After AMAT has a firmer footing, it can redefine  the competitive space by packaging its solar technology with automotive technology.   Additionally, with  legislation and funding in favor of both solar energy and clean electric vehicles combined, there would be  a synergy of resources that would spur technological advancement. As consumers become aware of the  advancement and accessibility in technologies this would cause a virtuous cycle in economic and political  trends.     Construction Industry  Applied Materials should work with the construction industry to have clear solar panels installed in newly  constructed  homes  and  commercial  properties.    Additionally,  they  should  contract  with  developers  to  construct buildings with natural looking roof top solar panels.   Even though clear solar panels are not yet  as  effective  as  regular  solar  panels,  they  have  aesthetic  value  and  are  currently  being  used  in  many  structures.   Applied Materials should work with developers as long as it can break even.  With the advantage  of being a first mover and building a relationship with developers, Applied Materials could position itself  as the standard bearer for the industry and the concomitant technology. If AMAT can set the rules for the  industry,  it  can  potentially  block  new  entrants.  Working  with  developers  has  an  advantage  of  working  directly with consumers because it eases the financing dilemma and allows Applied Materials to reach a  larger market than going to consumer to consumer.   While  Applied  Materials  should  continue  to  construct  turnkey  solar  panel  farms  for  utility  companies, the trends indicate that one day; people will indeed be living and working in buildings that  seamlessly serve as power plants.   Political, Social and Competitive Implications:     As  social  awareness  and  accessibility  increases,  so  will  political  pressure  and  support.    Some  areas  of  concern are the possible health effects of having an individual surrounded by so much solar energy and  equipment.  Some people may be electromagnetic hypersensitivity and may experience symptoms such    ‐ 16 ‐
  • as  headaches  or  agitation.    More  research  is  needed  to  study  these  possibilities.      Additionally,  by  entering  into  exclusive  agreements  with  developers,  AMAT  can  apply  the  Judo  strategy  of  ‘gripping  its  opponents’  and  create  barriers  to  entry  for  competitors  such  as  DuPont  and  block  potential  smaller  companies from entering the industry.      ‐ 17 ‐
  • Appendix A Table 1 Stakeholder, Trends and Uncertainty Relationships S1   effect through legislation, funding and tax credits.  y p p p y p p p S2 state wide initiatives. Yet, local and state governments lack the power to regulate national industries such as the oil industry.   p g gy p y p g p g gy p S3 negative effect on the oil industry.  STAKEHOLDERS gy p gy p p y p p p S4 energy and resources will be divided between wind, solar, thermal and bio‐fuels.   y p p y g y y p   S5 S6 panels and the possibility of cars being energy independent the auto industry will have a positive effect on the solar industry.  positive influence on the solar industry.  S7 solar industry. S8 Shareholders/Investors: Investment in solar power in the U.S. is expected to reach $450 billion to $650 billion between now and 2025. (Needs Source) p y p p p gy S9 wind, solar, thermal and bio‐fuels.     S10 Environmental Groups:  Environmental groups will continue to have positive grassroots effect on the solar industry.  y g y g g p y S11 pushing technological boundaries; making solar technology more feasible.  T1 Climate Change:  With the planet temperature continuing to rise, the need for solar technology increases.    Efficient Technology: The Cost to power output for solar power is reducing at an accelerated rate and is almost reaching cost parity with conventional energy sources. By 2018 it is expected that the cost will be as low as $3 per peak watt or less. By 2015, it is expected that capital cost for fuel, coal and natural gas and nuclear will rise as the T2 cost for alternative sources decline and a “cross‐over” point will be reached.  T3 Solar power will evolve to become a plug and play technology with cheap and easily installation that will make it popular with the average consumer. T4 Investment: As stated above, investment is growing and additional competition is pushing technology advancement.  gy g y g p y p g p TRENDS T5   T6 renewable.g p p g p g gy these markets will be the fastest growing areas in alternative energy investment in research and development. g p gy gy p U1 effort at investing in coal tech and nuclear power? Will oil and utility companies embrace and support innovation in alternative energy or move to destabilize innovation  g g gy g g U2 future president be pro‐clean energy?   U3 U4 stringer climate control laws? Developing Countries' Growth Will developing countries continue to grow at their current rate and need to satiate their hunger for fuel as currently forecast? g y g q y g g g g U5 both compatible and competing technologies.      ‐ 18 ‐
  • Appendix B Table 2 Scenario Matrix    S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 U1 U2 U3 U4 U5 S1 Federal Government + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + S2 Local & State  Government ? ? + ? + ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?  +  +  +  ?  ? S3 Energy Companies Oil ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? S4 Energy Companies Alterative + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + Stakeholders S5 Auto Industry + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + S6 Utility Companies + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + S7 Consumers + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + S8 Shareholders/Investors + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + S9 Farmers ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? S10 Enviromental Groups + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + S11 Scientists + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + T1 Climate Change + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + T2 Efficient Technology  + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + Trends T3 Investment + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + T4 Clean Energy President + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + T5 Developing Countries Growth:  + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + U1 Oil Prices ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Uncertainities U2 Federal & State Legislation ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? U3 Federal & State Funding ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? U4 Developing Countries' Growth  ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? U5 Technological Advancement ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?   ‐ 19 ‐
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY Aditi Justa. 10 March 2010. “World's largest solar powered creations” Retrieved from  http://www.worldsbiggests.com/2010/03/world‐largest‐solar‐powered‐creations.html/ “Applied Material Acquires all of Advent Solar’s Assets”. 09 November  2009. Retrieved from  http://www.newenergyworldnetwork.com/renewable‐energy‐news/by_technology/solar‐by_technology‐ new‐news/applied‐materials‐acquires‐all‐of‐advent‐solar%E2%80%99s‐assets.html “Applied Materials, Inc. ‐ Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A), Partnerships & Alliances and Investment  Report”. March 2009. Retrieved from www.datamonitor.com "Chevrolet Volt ‐ GM's Concept Electric Vehicle ‐ Could Nearly Eliminate Trips To The Gas Station".    08 January 2008. Retrieved from www.gm.com Bland, Eric. 25 January 2010. “Tobacco Plants Tapped to Grow Solar Cells”. Retrieved from  http://news.discovery.com/tech/tobacco‐plants‐solar‐cells.html Clayton, Jeffryes, Timothy Guto, Jun Jiao, and Gregory Rorrer. 7 May 2010.  "Metabolic Insertion of  Nanostructured TiO2 into the Patterned Biosilica of the Diatom Pinnularia sp. by a Two‐Stage Bioreactor  Cultivation Process." Retrieved from  http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn800470x?cookieSet=1&journalCode=ancac3 “Enabling Renewable Energy Today”. (n.d) Retrieved from http://www.cleanpowerfinance.com/ “Environmental Scan, Solar Industry, SF Bay & Greater Bay Area Region”. April 2008. Retrieved from   http://www.coeccc.net/Environmental_Scans/Solar_Scan_SF‐SV_08.pdf/ Fast Solar Energy Facts. July 2009. Retrieved from  http://www.solarbuzz.com/FastFactsIndustry.htm Feed‐In Tariffs. May 4, 2010. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feed‐in_TariffKricenki, Ali. 27  Apr 2010. "SOLARA: CA’s First Solar‐powered Apartment Community." Retrieved from http://www.inhabitat.com/2007/12/05/solara‐californias‐first‐solar‐powered‐apartment‐community/ Form 10‐K, Applied Material Inc. December 2009. Retrieved from http://www.corporate‐ ir.net/seccapsule/seccapsule.asp?m=f&c=112059&fid=6634471&dc= “Industrial Nanotech Enters Asian Solar Market”.04 November 2009. http://www.solarfeeds.com/energy‐ boom/9637‐industrial‐nanotech‐enters‐asian‐solar‐market.html/ Lance, Jennifer. (n.d.) “Engineered Virus Cause Tobacco Plant to Grow Solar Cells”. Retrieved from  http://greenlivingideas.com/topics/alternative‐energy/engineered‐virus‐tobacco‐plants‐grow‐solar‐ cells Madway, Gabriel. 12 May 2009. “Applied Material Posts Loss as Revenue Tumbles”. Retrieved from  http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE54B6QA20090512    ‐ 20 ‐
  • "Nissan Leaf Electric Car." 27 April 2010. Retrieved from http://www.nissanusa.com/leaf‐electric‐ car/index#/leaf‐electric‐car/specs‐features/index/ Renewable Portfolio Standard Facts Sheets. April 2009. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov/chp/state‐ policy/renewable_fs.html  “Solar Industry Face Steep Price Drop”. 15 March 2010. Retrieved from http://imaginesolar.com/?p=1380 Solar Energy Industries Association. (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.seia.org/cs/state_fact_sheets “Telsa Roadster, Uncompromised Design, Performance and Technology”. 27 Apr 2010. Retrieved from  http://www.teslamotors.com/               ‐ 21 ‐
  • END NOTES                                                              1  http://www.appliedmaterials.com/about/index.html  2  http://www.appliedmaterials.com/  3  http://www.epa.gov/chp/state‐policy/renewable_fs.html  4  http://www.solarbuzz.com/FastFactsIndustry.htm  5  http://www.seia.org/cs/state_fact_sheets  6  http://greenlivingideas.com/topics/alternative‐energy/engineered‐virus‐tobacco‐plants‐grow‐solar‐cells  7  http://www.solarfeeds.com/energy‐boom/9637‐industrial‐nanotech‐enters‐asian‐solar‐market.html  8  http://www.appliedmaterials.com/about/assets/corp_overview.pdf  9  http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE54B6QA20090512  10  http://www.appliedmaterials.com/about/assets/corp_overview.pdf  11  http://www.appliedmaterials.com/products/solar_capabilities_3.html?menuID=9_5_1  12  www.datamonitor.com  13  http://imaginesolar.com/?p=1380  14  http://www.coeccc.net/Environmental_Scans/Solar_Scan_SF‐SV_08.pdf  15  http://news.discovery.com/tech/tobacco‐plants‐solar‐cells.html  16  http://www.cleanpowerfinance.com/  17  http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/appliedmaterials/index.jsp?epi‐ content=GENERIC&newsId=20060707005423&ndmHsc=v2*A1167656400000*B1178676791000*C4102491599000*DgroupByDate* J2*N1002992&newsLang=en&beanID=547561197&viewID=news_view  18  http://www.newenergyworldnetwork.com/renewable‐energy‐news/by_technology/solar‐by_technology‐new‐news/applied‐ materials‐acquires‐all‐of‐advent‐solar%E2%80%99s‐assets.html  19 General Motors (2007‐01‐07). "Chevrolet Volt ‐ GM's Concept Electric Vehicle ‐ Could Nearly Eliminate Trips To The Gas Station".  Press release. Retrieved 2007‐01‐08.  20 Nissan, USA. "Nisan Leaf Electric Car." Nissan (2010): n. pag. Web. 27 Apr 2010. <http://www.nissanusa.com/leaf‐electric‐ car/index#/leaf‐electric‐car/specs‐features/index>.  Telsa Motors “Telsa Roaderste, Uncompromised Design, Performance and Technology”. Telsa 2010 27 Apr 2010  <http://www.teslamotors.com/>    ‐ 22 ‐