Chapter 15 Anti- Slavery/
California
Americans Oppose Slavery
 In the 1830’s Americans took a more
organized action supporting abolition
o Abolition : A compl...
 Though many wanted to see the African
American set free many would argue about
how much freedom they should have.
o Some...
Thought this would prevent conflicts
between the races in the U.S.
American Colonization Society
 An organization dedic...
Spreading the Word
• William Lloyd Garrison
 Published an abolitionist newspaper, the
Liberator beginning in 1831.
 Garr...
Angelina and Sarah Grimke
 Two white southern women, who came from a
South Carolina Slave holding family but
disagreed wi...
Frederick Douglass
 Douglass escaped from slavery when he was
20 and went on to become one the most
important leaders in ...
o His public speaking skills
were impressive and
members of the Anti-Slavery
Society would ask him to give
regular lecture...
The Underground Railroad
 By the 1830s a
loosely organized
group had begun
helping slaves
escape from the
south.
o Free A...
 The Underground
Railroad: was not an
actual railroad but was a
network of people who
arranged transportation
and hiding ...
o There was never a central
leadership
o The people who led the
groups to freedom were
called “conductors” ( one of
the mo...
Not All People in the North
Opposed Slavery
 Newspapers and politicians warned that freed
slaves would move north and tak...
 Congress used the “gag rule”: is a rule that
limits or forbids the raising, consideration or
discussion.
o North saw it ...
New Land Renews Slavery
Disputes
 After winning the Mexican
American war in 1848, the
United States added
500,000 square ...
Polk wanted to extend
this line to the west
coast
Others wanted to
extend Popular
Sovereignty
 The idea that political
...
California Question
o The gold rush had
caused such a rapid
population growth, that
California applied to
join the Union a...
 It looked as though it
was leaning towards
free, slavery was illegal
when it was under the
control of Mexico and
most of...
Compromise of 1850
“The Great Compromiser”
Henry Clay had a plan
again.
 California would enter the
Union as a free state...
 Texas would give up land on the east of the
upper Rio Grande, so that the government
would pay Texas debts from when it ...
• Not everyone was happy
with this compromise,
John C. Calhoun of South
Carolina didn’t want
California entering as a
free...
Fugitive Slave Act
o Newly passed, made it a
crime to help runaway
slaves and allowed officials
to arrest those slaves in
...
 Northerners disliked
the idea of a trial
without a jury, also
they disapproved of
the commissioners
higher fees for the
...
Anti-Slavery Literature
o Uncle Tom’s Cabin
 Written by Harriet Beecher
Stowe
 Spoke out powerfully
against slavery
 Sh...
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Chapter 15 anti slavery

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Anti-Slavery Movement in American in the 1800's, also deals with Uncle Toms Cabin, Abolitionists such as Douglass and Garrison.

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Chapter 15 anti slavery

  1. 1. Chapter 15 Anti- Slavery/ California
  2. 2. Americans Oppose Slavery  In the 1830’s Americans took a more organized action supporting abolition o Abolition : A complete end to slavery
  3. 3.  Though many wanted to see the African American set free many would argue about how much freedom they should have. o Some thought they should have the same as the white Americans o Some were against full political and social equality o Some wanted to send them back to Africa to set up colonies.
  4. 4. Thought this would prevent conflicts between the races in the U.S. American Colonization Society  An organization dedicated to establishing colonies of freed slaves in Africa  Founded the colony of Liberia on the west coast of Africa.
  5. 5. Spreading the Word • William Lloyd Garrison  Published an abolitionist newspaper, the Liberator beginning in 1831.  Garrison helped start the American Anti- Slavery Society its member wanted immediate emancipation and racial equality for African Americans. o Both the Liberator and the American Anti-Slavery Society members spread antislavery literature and petitioned Congress to end federal support of slavery.
  6. 6. Angelina and Sarah Grimke  Two white southern women, who came from a South Carolina Slave holding family but disagreed with their parents support of slavery o Wrote American Slavery As It Is in 1839 and the book was one of the most important antislavery works of its time.
  7. 7. Frederick Douglass  Douglass escaped from slavery when he was 20 and went on to become one the most important leaders in the 1800s. o He had secretly learned to read and write as a boy (despite the law against it)
  8. 8. o His public speaking skills were impressive and members of the Anti-Slavery Society would ask him to give regular lectures. o He also published a newspaper called the North Star and wrote several autobiographies.
  9. 9. The Underground Railroad  By the 1830s a loosely organized group had begun helping slaves escape from the south. o Free African Americans, former slaves and a few white abolitionists worked together.
  10. 10.  The Underground Railroad: was not an actual railroad but was a network of people who arranged transportation and hiding places for fugitives or escaped slaves. o Fugitives would travel along “freedom trails” to northern state or Canada.
  11. 11. o There was never a central leadership o The people who led the groups to freedom were called “conductors” ( one of the most famous conductors was Harriet Tubman) o Places they stopped were called “stations” o People who owned the places that they stopped at were called “ Station masters”
  12. 12. Not All People in the North Opposed Slavery  Newspapers and politicians warned that freed slaves would move north and take jobs from white workers.  Abolitionist leaders were threaten with violence ( a mob even killed one abolitionist leader Elijah Lovejoy)
  13. 13.  Congress used the “gag rule”: is a rule that limits or forbids the raising, consideration or discussion. o North saw it as too touchy as a subject o South did not want to debate it
  14. 14. New Land Renews Slavery Disputes  After winning the Mexican American war in 1848, the United States added 500,000 square miles of land. o The addition of land brought up the debate of slavery o The Missouri Compromise of 1820 divided the Louisiana Purchase, prohibiting slavery north of 36 degrees 30’ line latitude.
  15. 15. Polk wanted to extend this line to the west coast Others wanted to extend Popular Sovereignty  The idea that political power belongs to the people. oThe people should decide on banning or allowing slavery.
  16. 16. California Question o The gold rush had caused such a rapid population growth, that California applied to join the Union as a state instead of as a territory.  But would it be a free state or a slave state?
  17. 17.  It looked as though it was leaning towards free, slavery was illegal when it was under the control of Mexico and most of the settlers were from free states. • the South was upset that it looked like there would be in imbalance between the states if California entered as a free state
  18. 18. Compromise of 1850 “The Great Compromiser” Henry Clay had a plan again.  California would enter the Union as a free state  The rest of the Mexican Cession would be federal land, and popular sovereignty would decide on slavery
  19. 19.  Texas would give up land on the east of the upper Rio Grande, so that the government would pay Texas debts from when it was an independent republic.  The slave trade…. But not slavery would in the capital  A more effective fugitive slave law would be passed.
  20. 20. • Not everyone was happy with this compromise, John C. Calhoun of South Carolina didn’t want California entering as a free state because it would destroy the balance, he would asked that the slave states be allowed to secede or formally withdraw from the union.
  21. 21. Fugitive Slave Act o Newly passed, made it a crime to help runaway slaves and allowed officials to arrest those slaves in free areas.  Slaveholders could use testimony from white witnesses, but enslaved African Americans accused of being fugitives could not testify.  Commissioners who rejected a slaveholders claim earned $5 while those who returned a suspected fugitive to slaveholders earned $10
  22. 22.  Northerners disliked the idea of a trial without a jury, also they disapproved of the commissioners higher fees for the returning slaves.  The most horrifying part was that some free African Americans had been captured and sent to the south.
  23. 23. Anti-Slavery Literature o Uncle Tom’s Cabin  Written by Harriet Beecher Stowe  Spoke out powerfully against slavery  She was a daughter of a preacher who had met fugitive slaves and learned about the cruelties of slavery  It was published in 1852, within a decade it sold more than 2 million copies.
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