Maker culture – the making of

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Where does this all-hyped-up maker movement come from anyway? A little archeology, and some emphasis on autonomy, generativity, and more free time.

Talk at retune 2012.

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Maker culture – the making of

  1. 1. Maker Culture The Making-ofWolfgang Wopperer | retune, 28.10.2012
  2. 2. The Maker Movement (according to Anderson)
  3. 3. The Maker Movement (according to Anderson)1. Digital desktop tools to create and prototype designs
  4. 4. The Maker Movement (according to Anderson)1. Digital desktop tools to create and prototype designs2. A cultural norm to share those designs
  5. 5. The Maker Movement (according to Anderson)1. Digital desktop tools to create and prototype designs2. A cultural norm to share those designs3. Common design file standards to send the designs to commercial manufacturing services
  6. 6. Maker Culture
  7. 7. A little archeology
  8. 8. CraftingMaking things yourself
  9. 9. CraftingMaking things yourself
  10. 10. CraftingMaking things yourself
  11. 11. CraftingMaking things yourself
  12. 12. Whole Earth Catalog “Access to Tools”
  13. 13. Whole Earth Catalog “Access to Tools”
  14. 14. Whole Earth Catalog “Access to Tools”
  15. 15. Whole Earth Catalog “Access to Tools”
  16. 16. PLATOComputers connecting people
  17. 17. PLATOComputers connecting people
  18. 18. PLATOComputers connecting people
  19. 19. FOSSNetworked collaboration on a global scale
  20. 20. FOSSNetworked collaboration on a global scale
  21. 21. FOSSNetworked collaboration on a global scale
  22. 22. Maker Culture(personally biased view)
  23. 23. Maker Culture (personally biased view)1. Making things yourself
  24. 24. Maker Culture (personally biased view)1. Making things yourself2. Access to tools and knowledge
  25. 25. Maker Culture (personally biased view)1. Making things yourself2. Access to tools and knowledge3. Computers connecting people
  26. 26. Maker Culture (personally biased view)1. Making things yourself2. Access to tools and knowledge3. Computers connecting people4. Networked collaboration on a global scale
  27. 27. Some common threads
  28. 28. Autonomy
  29. 29. Collaboration
  30. 30. Amateurism
  31. 31. (Like on the Web)
  32. 32. (Like on the Web)
  33. 33. (Like on the Web)
  34. 34. (Like on the Web)
  35. 35. (Like on the Web)
  36. 36. (Like in your neigbourhood)
  37. 37. (Like in your neigbourhood)
  38. 38. (Like in your neigbourhood)
  39. 39. (Like in your neigbourhood)
  40. 40. Some consequences
  41. 41. requirementsSome consequences
  42. 42. Generativity
  43. 43. Generativity
  44. 44. Generativity
  45. 45. Generativity
  46. 46. Openness
  47. 47. Openness
  48. 48. Openness
  49. 49. Openness
  50. 50. More free time
  51. 51. @wowo101 wolfgang@todayimade.co http://todayimade.cohttp://stpauli.makerhood.de

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