Find levy facts here
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Find levy facts here

on

  • 541 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
541
Views on SlideShare
299
Embed Views
242

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

3 Embeds 242

http://www.worthingtonlibraries.org 240
https://m.facebook.com&_=1383653386520 HTTP 1
https://www.facebook.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Hello. My name is ____________________ and I’m the ______________________ at Worthington Libraries. I’d like to thank you for giving me the opportunity to talk to you about the library’s upcoming levy issue.
  • I’d like to start by sharing some information about how the Library is funded. Worthington Libraries, and all public libraries in Ohio, receive funding through the state’s Public Library Fund. This accounts for 19 percent of the library’s annual revenue. As part of a partnership agreement, we receive money from Columbus Metropolitan Library to fund the operation of Northwest Library, which serves patrons in both of our respective service areas. The Library also receives funding from two local property tax levies: a 22-year 2.2 mill operating levy passed in 1992 and a permanent 2.6 mill operating levy passed in 2005.
  • Here you can see the breakdown of the library’s income and expenses in 2012. I’d like to call your attention to the 20 percent of our annual operating expenditures that was spent on materials. This is considered the “gold standard” for public libraries. Most libraries spend only 13 percent of their operating budget on materials. In addition, Worthington Libraries, at 62 percent, spends significantly less than most businesses and public agencies on salaries and benefits. We have been able to keep these costs relatively flat through careful review of each position, cross-training and working to find the most cost-effective benefits package for employees each year.
  • At Worthington Libraries, careful stewardship of public funds is very important to both the staff and board of trustees. We constantly work to streamline our operation and find alternate sources of funding whenever possible.
  • Since 2006, the library’s financial management has been recognized with numerous awards on both the state and national level. Even with funding cuts and increases in circulation and programming attendance, Worthington Libraries has not been on the ballot in eight years.
  • But now, it is time to ask for additional funding, and here are the specifics of our upcoming ballot initiative: The 2.2 mill levy passed in 1992 will expire in 2014. The earliest the Library can be on the ballot to replace this funding is November 2013. In June, the Worthington Schools Board of Education, which serves as the library’s taxing authority, voted to place a 2.2 mill permanent replacement levy on the November 5 ballot on behalf of Worthington Libraries. It will cost the owner of a $100,000 home an additional $37.44 per year or $3.12 per month. If passed this November, collection will begin in 2015.
  • Voters in the Worthington School District, which has the same boundaries as the Worthington library district, are eligible to vote on this levy issue.
  • It’s important that library funding be maintained to meet the continuing demand for library service. Because levy collection rates decline over time, the 2.2 mill levy passed in 1992 is currently being collected at an effective rate of 1.25 mills. Replacing this levy at 2.2 mills of current assessed property value will make it possible for the Library to both maintain and incrementally expand library service as needed.
  • This funding will enable Worthington Libraries to remain one of the best library systems in the country, and to provide residents with materials, services and programs needed to meet their academic and professional goals.
  • If the levy fails, we will work with the community to determine our next steps.
  • I’ve talked about the increasing demand for library service and how much the library has changed. If you have not visited one of our libraries in recent years or think of a library as only a quiet place to study and check out books, you might be surprised by how much libraries have changed.
  • Worthington Libraries has more than 90,000 registered borrowers. More than one million people visit our libraries and our website each year.
  • Worthington Libraries is the ninth highest circulating library in the state, behind only the eight metropolitan library systems. In 2012, we checked out more than 3.3 million items or approximately 36 items per cardholder.
  • We provide access to more than 94,000 digital titles. You can browse, reserve and read library books on your eReader or computer without ever visiting one of our physical locations.
  • Your library card is now a lot more powerful. In 2012, we joined the Central Library Consortium and now provide access to over four million items through a partnership with 10 other library systems.
  • The Library helps children learn to read by providing books, storytimes and other programs designed to improve early childhood literacy. In 2012, the library’s storytimes were attended by more than 36,000 children and their caregivers.
  • To help students, we have dedicated Homework Help Centers in each of our current locations. During the school year, the centers provide homework assistance to dozens of students each week. Visits to the centers increased 25 percent in 2012. Funding to establish the centers was provided by the Friends Foundation of Worthington Libraries and several other community organizations, individuals and businesses.
  • The Library also helps area businesses by providing exclusive access to online resources and market research databases, forums for professionals to discuss leadership topics and outreach to the Worthington Area Chamber of Commerce.
  • Speaking of outreach, the library staff visits hundreds of schools and community sites each year. In 2012, more than 14,000 people attended library outreach programs. One of the most rewarding outreach programs we offer is delivery of materials to people no longer able to visit us in person. More than 2,400 items were delivered to people who are homebound in 2012.
  • Our partnership with the Shops at Worthington Place to conduct storytimes in their space once per month has been incredibly successful with more than 100 children and their parents attending each event.
  • In 2012, library programs were attended by more than 61,000 people. Since 2005, the last time the Library was on the ballot, program attendance has increased 68 percent.
  • None of this happened by accident. Worthington Libraries has had a strategic plan in place for more than 20 years. Our strategic plans are living documents, developed with extensive research and community input and lived each and every day.
  • Our current 2013-2015 Strategic Plan was developed with input from hundreds of residents who provided feedback about the future direction of the Library.
  • Through surveys, we learned that 97 percent of residents are satisfied with the library’s performance and 83 percent would support a replacement funding levy.
  • Our research also highlighted how fast the library world is changing and how important it is for us to not only keep up with evolving technology and societal trends, but to stay in front of them and to help guide community learning and engagement around new ideas.
  • And community engagement is the heart of what we do at Worthington Libraries. We are here to help you, your children, your business—everyone—with whatever they need. Library staff members are encouraged to be involved citizens and are currently active in more than 100 community and professional organizations.
  • Here is a list of some of the community organizations and businesses we have partnered with in the last year.
  • Worthington Libraries was the first library established in Franklin County and only the third library in the state when it was established in 1803. Our community was turned down twice by the Carnegie Foundation because, and I quote, “so small a community could not support a library.” You certainly proved them wrong. Worthington Libraries was the best library in the nation in 2007 and is one of only 30 libraries in the country to be ranked as a five-star library for four years in a row. Now, we have the opportunity to be even better, to go farther and to reimagine library service for future generations.
  • Thank you.

Find levy facts here Find levy facts here Presentation Transcript

  • Find levy facts here. OLD WORTHINGTON LIBRARY 820 High Street Worthington, OH 43085 NORTHWEST LIBRARY 2280 Hard Road Columbus, OH 43235 WORTHINGTON PARK LIBRARY 1389 Worthington Centre Drive Worthington, OH 43085 worthingtonlibraries.org/levy
  • LIBRARY FUNDING How is the Library funded?  Worthington Libraries receives funding from the State of Ohio through the Public Library Fund. This accounts for 19 percent of the library’s annual revenue.  The Library also receives income from fines and fees, the Columbus Metropolitan Library and two local property tax levies.  The first levy, passed by voters in the Worthington School District in 1992, is a 22-year 2.2 mill levy. Income from this levy accounts for 22 percent of the library’s annual revenue. It expires in 2014.  The second levy, a 2.6 mill permanent operating levy was passed by voters in 2005. Income from this levy accounts for 37 percent of the library’s annual revenue.
  • LIBRARY FUNDING 66% 19% 10% 5% General Property Tax Levy* Public Library Fund Funds from Columbus Metropolitan Library Other 62% 20% 16% 1% Salaries & Benefits Library Materials Purchased Services Supplies/Other 2012 Revenue 2012 Operating Expenditures Total Revenue: $10,282,788 Total Operating Expenditures: $8,447,695 *This figure includes the Homestead Rollback, Personal Property Tax Reimbursement & the Public Utility Fund Reimbursement.
  • LEVY FUNDING  Despite significant declines in state funding, the Library has not been on the ballot since 2005.  Since that time, library circulation has increased 32 percent and programming attendance has increased 68 percent.  The new Homework Help Centers were funded by private donations and the Friends Foundation of Worthington Libraries.  The library’s financial reports are fully transparent and available online. HOW WELL DOES THE LIBRARY MANAGE MONEY?
  • Worthington Libraries was recognized with a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association for our 2012 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. Less than 10 percent of government agencies nationally receive this award. Award for Excellence in Financial Reporting
  • LEVY SPECIFICS  It is a 2.2 mill replacement levy that will be collected for a continuing period of time.  It replaces the 2.2 mill operating levy passed by Worthington School District residents in 1992.  It will cost the owner of a $100,000 house an additional $3.12 per month or $37.44 per year.  Collection will begin in 2015. What is the millage? What is the cost to homeowners?
  • LEVY SPECIFICS  Registered voters in the Worthington School District, which has the same boundaries as the Worthington library district, can vote on the issue.  This includes residents in the City of Worthington and Riverlea, as well as parts of Sharon Township, Perry Township and the City of Columbus. WHO CAN VOTE ON THIS LEVY ISSUE?
  • LEVY SPECIFICS  Funding from this expiring levy provides a significant source of income for Worthington Libraries, comprising 22 percent of our annual revenue.  Because levy collection rates decline over time, it is currently being collected at an effective rate of 1.25 mills.  Replacing this levy at 2.2 mills of current assessed property value will make it possible for the Library to maintain and expand services in order to meet increasing demand. WHY IS THIS FUNDING NECESSARY?
  • • Funding from the 2.2 mill permanent replacement levy will make it possible for Worthington Libraries to continue providing excellent service and to meet the demands of residents in the areas of technology and digital access. What will you do if the levy passes?
  • • If the levy fails, we will work with the community to determine what actions to take to best serve residents in the Worthington School District. What will you do if the levy fails?
  • Can’t people find everything they need online? Do people still use libraries? You may be surprised. LIBRARY USE
  • LIBRARY USE • 91,529 people are registered borrowers of Worthington Libraries. • Annual user visits to the Library totaled more than 1.6 million in 2012 • Annual website visits totaled more than one million Fun with Math & Science program at Old Worthington Library.
  • CIRCULATION • We checked out more than 3.3 million items in 2012. • Worthington Libraries ranks ninth in the state, behind only the eight metropolitan library systems (which have larger service populations) in total circulation.
  • DIGITAL BOOKS  In 2012, circulation of digital books increased more than 130 percent!  Thousands of free eBooks and read-along books are available for download from Worthington Libraries.  More than 94,000 items are currently available.
  • LIBRARY USE: COLLECTION In 2012, Worthington Libraries joined the Central Library Consortium, a partnership of 11 library systems across six counties. As a result, we now provide residents with access to over four million items.
  • SERVICES: EARLY LITERACY  We help children learn to read.  We provide books, programs and parent information that focus on helping children develop reading skills.  Storytimes were attended by 36,111 children and parents/caregivers in 2012, a five percent increase over 2011.
  • SERVICES: HOMEWORK HELP  Opened first Homework Help Center in 2008 at the Worthington Park Library.  Visits increased 35 percent in 2012.  Additional centers opened at Old Worthington Library and Northwest Library in early 2013. A packed house at the Homework Help Center at Worthington Park Library.
  • SERVICES: JOBS & BUSINESS  Programs for small businesses, job seekers and entrepreneurs.  Access to market research and legal forms.  Resume software and free printing.  Staff assistance when filling out applications and free resume review.
  • SERVICES: OUTREACH  In 2012, outreach programs were attended by 14,482 people, an increase of 40 percent!  We deliver books and other materials to those who aren’t able to visit us in person.  More than 2,467 items were delivered to people who are homebound in 2012.
  • SERVICES: OUTREACH We visit preschools, daycare centers and private schools to present storytimes and talk about library services. We lead character storytimes at the Shops at Worthington Place once per month.
  • PROGRAMMING  Programming at Worthington Libraries is sponsored by the Friends Foundation of Worthington Libraries. • In 2012, we offered more than 1,600 programs, attended by 61,347 people. • This was a 10 percent increase over 2011.
  • STRATEGIC PLANNING  We have had a strategic plan in place for more than 20 years.  Focusing on two or three years at a time, each plan serves as a detailed roadmap for the future.  Our 2012 strategic planning process was led by a staff team and included input from hundreds of people in the community.
  • STRATEGIC PLANNING  Focus groups with 54 people  Survey of 302 residents  Strategic questions posted in the libraries and on social media  Trend tracking
  • SURVEY FINDINGS  97 percent are satisfied or highly satisfied with the library’s performance.  78 percent believe the Library has the right number of locations to serve the community.  67 percent believe the Library uses its money wisely.  66 percent believe the Library provides the programs and services they need.  83 percent would support a replacement funding levy
  • STRATEGIC PLANNING RESULTS Our research shows:  The library world is changing rapidly.  We must evolve to meet demand for information in various formats.  We must provide space for people to use the library in different ways. Trend Tracking
  • COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT • Community involvement is part of our organizational culture, and everyone at the Library is encouraged to get involved with other community organizations. • Worthington Libraries staff members are actively involved with more than 100 community and professional organizations. • We make every effort to have library representation at all large community events. • We are privileged to be part of such a caring and giving community.
  • COMMUNITY PARTNERS Key Community Partners Additional Partners  Each year, Worthington Libraries partners with the Worthington Schools to present dozens of events and special programs to support and enhance the school curriculum.  The Library regularly partners with the City of Worthington and its many agencies in the presentation of programs and events.  We work with the Worthington Area Chamber of Commerce to provide programs and services targeted to the business and professional community.  The Friends Foundation of Worthington Libraries serve as sponsor for all library programs and special events. The Library also partners with several other community organizations and businesses including: Big Green Head Chipotle Cheryl’s Cookies City Barbecue Columbus Clippers Columbus Museum of Art Dairy Queen Donatos Healthy Worthington Resource Center & Food Pantry Holiday Inn of Worthington House Wine Igloo Letterpress Leadership Worthington Peggy R. McConnell Arts Center Shops at Worthington Place Skate Zone 71 Sustainable Worthington Worthington AM Rotary Club Worthington Garden Club Worthington Historical Society Worthington Parks & Recreation
  • FIVE-STAR LIBRARY  Each year since 2009, more than 7,500 libraries across the country are evaluated by Library Journal on several service indicators, including financial management.  Worthington Libraries is one of only 87 libraries in the country to receive a five-star rating.  One of only 30 libraries ranked as five-star every year the index has been published.
  • Find a great community here. Thank you!
  • QUESTIONS?  James Hill, President  hill_249@fisher.osu.edu  David Goldberger, Vice President  Dawn Valasco, Secretary  J. Craig Baker  John Butterfield  Daniel Lacey  Linda Mercadante  Chuck Gibson, Director/CEO  cgibson@worthingtonlibraries.org  Monica Baughman, Deputy Director  mbaughman@worthingtonlibraries.org  Margaret Doone, CFO/Business Manager  mdoone@worthingtonlibraries.org  Lisa Fuller, Director of Community Engagement  lfuller@worthingtonlibraries.org  Susan Allen, Director of Technology Services  Phyllis Winfield, Human Resources Manager  Pam Beretich, Executive Assistant Board of Trustees Administrative Staff Campaign Chairs Elizabeth Sommer: Elizabeth.Sommer@Huntington.com Lynn Nadler: lynnnadler@gmail.com Rick Bradley: creativityrb@yahoo.com