World	
  	
  Mentor	
  
Dynamic	
  Capabili-es	
  –	
  Mentoring	
  Program	
  
	
  
May	
  2014	
  
Welcome	
  to	
  Worl...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
Mentor	
  training	
  
Weekly	
  theme:	
  	
  
•  Program...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
Programme	
  norms	
  
•  Confiden=ality	
  
–  All	
  your...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
Why	
  become	
  a	
  mentor?	
  
Here	
  are	
  some	
  o...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
The	
  mentoring	
  rela=onship	
  
•  Mentoring	
  is	
  ...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
What	
  makes	
  a	
  great	
  mentor?	
  
Research	
  of	...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
What	
  makes	
  a	
  great	
  mentor?	
  
A	
  great	
  m...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
Essen=al	
  quali=es	
  of	
  a	
  “coachable”	
  
mentee	...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
The	
  role	
  of	
  the	
  mentor	
  is	
  to	
  support	...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
The	
  mentor	
  orienta=on	
  
•  Your	
  job	
  is	
  no...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
Consider	
  what	
  the	
  mentee	
  may	
  have	
  as	
  ...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
WriDen	
  communica=on	
  needs	
  to	
  convey	
  
both	
...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
Start	
  all	
  communica=on	
  with	
  empathy	
  
•  Sta...
©	
  World	
  Mentor	
  2010.	
  All	
  rights	
  reserved.	
  
Iden=fy	
  and	
  reflect	
  emo=ons	
  in	
  your	
  
mess...
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Topic 1 - Mentors

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Topic 1 - Mentors

  1. 1. World    Mentor   Dynamic  Capabili-es  –  Mentoring  Program     May  2014   Welcome  to  World  Mentor!  
  2. 2. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   Mentor  training   Weekly  theme:     •  Program  context  and  orienta=on     Topics:   •  Program  norms   •  Role  of  mentor   •  Guide  to  effec=ve  wriDen  communica=ons   •  Empathy  in  wriDen  communica=ons   •  Establishing  mentee  values  
  3. 3. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   Programme  norms   •  Confiden=ality   –  All  your  communica=ons  with  mentees  are  confiden=al  between  you.  While   World  Mentor  guides  monitor  the  conversa=ons  to  ensure  mentee  safety,   they  are  bound  by  the  same  confiden=ality  regula=ons.   •  Privacy   –  Please  do  not  share  contact  informa=on  such  as  personal  email  addresses  or   phone  numbers  for  the  dura=on  of  the  program.  If  you  require  to  contact  your   mentee  outside  our  website,  please  check  first  with  the  program  coordinator.   •  Volunteering   –  The  culture  of  volunteering  is  of  paramount  importance  to  the  mentoring   rela=onship.  Please  be  open  to  both  hear  your  mentee  and  share  with  them   experiences  that  may  help  them  see  new  paths  and  opportuni=es.  
  4. 4. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   Why  become  a  mentor?   Here  are  some  of  the  things  previous  mentors  loved   about  their  experience:     •  Sa=sfac=on  in  knowing  you  had  an  impact  on   someone’s  professional  and  personal  development   •  Development  of  leadership  skills  and  building   confidence   •  GeVng  a  fresh  perspec=ve  from  your  mentee   •  Helping  develop  your  professional  network  with  fellow   mentors   •  Receiving  recogni=on  from  peers  and  superiors  
  5. 5. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   The  mentoring  rela=onship   •  Mentoring  is  a  two-­‐way,  co-­‐ac=ve  rela=onship,  created  equally  by   the  mentee  and  the  mentor,  for  the  benefit  of  the  mentee   The   Mentoring   Triangle   Mentor Mentee Relationship •  The  rela=onship  is  constantly  changing  and  deepening;  it’s  an  on-­‐ going  process   •  The  mentee  brings  the  agenda;  the  Mentor  “holds”  the  process   and  holds  the  mentee  to  his/her  agenda   Mentee contributes to the relationship and benefits from it Mentor contributes to the relationship
  6. 6. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   What  makes  a  great  mentor?   Research  of  mentoring  literature  suggests  a  variety  of  answers:     -­‐  “A  sa=sfied  mentee.”;  “A  strong  sense  of  self”;     -­‐  “a  good  listener”;  someone  “offering  support,  encouragement   and  listening”;     -­‐  “a  person  who  is  willing  to  share  of  themselves;”  “mentors  try   to  unite  the  head  and  the  heart”;     -­‐  “shares  knowledge  and  wisdom  and  draws  out  the   possibili=es;”  “it's  vision,  voice  and  voca=on  -­‐  building  a   rela=onship;”  or  “someone  who  can  offer  advice  to  me  on   issues  besides  academic  maDers.”    
  7. 7. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   What  makes  a  great  mentor?   A  great  mentor  is  also:       •  A  pa=ent  listener  and  eagle-­‐eyed   •  Gives  advice  to  find  life  direc=on  without  dicta=ng  ac=ons   •  Is  prac=cal  and  gives  insights  about  keeping  on  task  and   seVng  goals  and  priori=es.   •  Mentors  use  their  personal  experience  to  help  their  mentees   avoid  mistakes  and  learn  from  good  decisions.   •  Mentors  give  specific  advice  on  what  was  done  well  or  could   be  corrected,  what  was  achieved  and  the  benefits  of  various   ac=ons.   •  Mentors  care  about  their  mentees’  progress  in  school  and   career  planning,  as  well  as  their  personal  development.   •  Offers  construc=ve  cri=cism  as  well  as  compliments  
  8. 8. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   Essen=al  quali=es  of  a  “coachable”   mentee   •  To  make  sure  that  your  mentoring  is  effec=ve  and  is  making   an  impact  on  the  mentee,  you  should  make  sure  that  your   mentee  has  or  develops  following  quali=es.   –  Asks  ques=ons   –  Willing  to  be  mentored   –  Strives  to  give  his/her  best  at  all  =mes   –  Accepts  cri=cism  graciously   –  Learns  from  mistakes   –  Has  courage  to  try  new  things   –  Accepts  responsibili=es   –  Open  and  honest   –  Respec_ul  and  grateful   –  Listens,  watches,  learns,  grows  
  9. 9. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   The  role  of  the  mentor  is  to  support  the   mentee  in  finding  their  answers   •  Work  with  mentee  to  effect  self  responsibility,  good  judgment,   decision  making  skills  and  cri=cal  thinking  through  “Connec=ve   Communica=on”  and  “Ac=ve  Understanding”   •  Iden=fy  specific  skills  they  want  to  improve  and  outcomes  they   want  from  the  program.   •  Assist  mentee  in  exploring  possibili=es  that:   –  Test  assump=ons,  beliefs,  thoughts,  feelings   –  Develop  further  insights  and/or  competencies   –  Challenge  and  stretch  mentee’s  goals   •  Ask  for  permission  to  offer  insights  that  would  be  advantageous  to   the  mentee   Let the mentee reach their own conclusions and decision – it’s the most powerful way of internalizing learning and making a meaningful contribution to the mentee’s success
  10. 10. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   The  mentor  orienta=on   •  Your  job  is  not  to  solve  the  mentees  issues.       •  It  is  to  help  the  mentee  gain  greater  clarity  that  may   help  them  find  a  resolu=on  or  ways  to  accomplish  their   goals   •  Resolu=on  does  not  have  to  occur  now  –  think  long   term.     •  Using  the  competencies  we  will  cover  in  these  slides   –  Ac=ve  understanding  and  inquiry       –  Curiosity,  wan=ng  to  understand,  and  empathy   –  Assuming  other  is  “healthy  and  whole”  (and  can  take  care   of  themselves)     –  Listening  for  linkages  across  situa=ons    
  11. 11. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   Consider  what  the  mentee  may  have  as  an   image  of  you  as  a  mentor   •  Projec=ons   –  ADribu=ons  of  one’s  own  thoughts  about  self  (usually   unacceptable  or  unwanted)  to  others   –  Projec=ons  are  unconscious  and  largely  unacknowledged     •  Transference   –  Redirec=on  of  their  feelings  for  one  person  to  another   –  Repe==on  of  a  rela=onship  in  the  present  based  on  a   different  rela=onship  in  the  past   •  Surfacing  projec=ons/transference   –  What  projec=ons/transference  has  the  mentee  had  with   me?   –  What  projects/transference  do  I  have  with  the  mentee?  
  12. 12. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   WriDen  communica=on  needs  to  convey   both  meaning  and  tone   •  WriDen  communica=on  needs  to  convey  the  same  meaning  and   tone  as  verbal  communica=on   •  We  usually  communicate  in  words,  tone,  and  what  we  don’t  say.   This  all  needs  to  be  considered  in  wriDen  communica=on   •  The  reader  has  his/her  own  percep=ons  of  the  message   •  We  need  to  be  clear  about  the  meaning  of  the  message  we  are   delivering   –  ie  “Why”  has  a  different  meaning  than  “What”   •  Examples:   –  “Why  didn't  you  do  that”  indicates  an  accusatory  tone   –  “What  stopped  you  doing  that”  indicates  a  curious  tone    A  great  way  to  check  your  wriDen  communica=on  is  to   read  it  to  yourself  out  loud  to  understand  the  tone   and  clarity  of  the  message  
  13. 13. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   Start  all  communica=on  with  empathy   •  Start  by  understanding  the  message  from  the  mentees  perspec=ve,   from  where  they  stand.  WriDen  communica=on  takes  a  liDle  more   effort  to  understand,  especially  when  working  with  different   genera=ons   •  What  is  the  mentee’s  context:  Fast,  slow,  long  responses,  short   responses     •  What  is  important  to  them  from  the  communica=on  they  sent  you?   •  What  are  they  not  saying:  maybe  not  answering  a  ques-on,   avoiding  a  subject,  no  context?   •  What  emo=ons  are  coming  through  in  their  communica=on:  anger,   frustra-on,  urgency,  apathe-c,  ambiguous,  excited,  happy,  sad,   disappointment?   •  What  is  the  tone  of  the  message:  read  it  aloud  to  help  uncover   tone.    
  14. 14. ©  World  Mentor  2010.  All  rights  reserved.   Iden=fy  and  reflect  emo=ons  in  your   messages   •  WriDen  communica=on  benefits  from  explicit  aDen=on  to   emo=ons.  Here  are  some  ideas  on  how  to  do  this   •  Picking  up  on  a  semi-­‐stated  (or  implied)  feeling     –  You  really  sound  worried  about…   •  Priori=zing  emo=ons   –  I  am  hearing  several  feelings,  but  it  sounds  like  the  most   important…   •  PuVng  yourself  in  the  other’s  place     –  If  I  was  experiencing  that,  I  would  be  feeling…  

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