Japan Kailee Favaro and Taylor Lacey
Introduction <ul><li>We decided to do a variety of stuff on Japan. The following slides are some examples of topics we fin...
Kimono <ul><li>Kimono means things to wear. </li></ul><ul><li>Today, a Japanese women usually owns only one kimono which s...
Ramen <ul><li>Ramen noodles are as thin as spaghetti.  </li></ul><ul><li>The soup that they are served in depends on your ...
Calligraphy <ul><li>A calligraphy set consists of Shitajiki which is a black, soft mat. </li></ul><ul><li>Bunchin which is...
Sumo Wrestling <ul><li>Sumo is the national sport of Japan. </li></ul><ul><li>Two sumo wrestlers fight in the sumo ring (d...
Tea Ceremony <ul><li>Chaji is a full tea presentation with a meal. </li></ul><ul><li>As in virtually every tea ceremony, t...
Miso <ul><li>Miso is soy bean paste. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s made by fermenting soy beans with salt and koji. Koji are ferm...
Buddhism <ul><li>Monks have traveled to the mainland bringing back Buddhist teachings and practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Als...
Kendo <ul><li>Kendo is the art and sport of Japanese stick fencing. </li></ul><ul><li>Swordsmanship was vital to samurais ...
Bathing <ul><li>Japanese take showers more than baths. </li></ul><ul><li>there are two purposes to taking a bath: cleaning...
Bowing <ul><li>Knowing how to bow in Japan might help you while you are traveling.  </li></ul><ul><li>Bowing (ojigi) is a ...
Shinto <ul><li>Shinto means &quot;the way of the gods”. </li></ul><ul><li>It is the indigenous faith of the Japanese peopl...
Origami <ul><li>Origami is a form of visual / sculptural representation.  </li></ul><ul><li>It is defined primarily by the...
Arranged Marriages <ul><li>Arranged marriages in Japan are now in the minority. </li></ul><ul><li>Over 70% of Japanese mar...
Eating and Drinking <ul><li>In Japan, you say &quot;itadakimasu&quot; (&quot;I gratefully receive&quot;) before eating.  <...
Ikebana <ul><li>Ikebana is the art of arranging flowers aesthetically.  </li></ul><ul><li>One tries to represent the three...
Sashimi <ul><li>Sashimi is thinly sliced, raw seafood. </li></ul><ul><li>Many different kinds of fresh fish and seafood ar...
Kabuki <ul><li>Kabuki is a traditional Japanese form of theater with its origins in the Edo period. </li></ul><ul><li>Kabu...
Ukiyo-e <ul><li>Ukiyo-e means &quot;pictures of the floating world“.  </li></ul><ul><li>It originated in the metropolitan ...
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Japan Powerpoint by Taylor Lacey and Kailee Favaro

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Here is a powerpoint on some very interesting aspects of Japan.

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Japan Powerpoint by Taylor Lacey and Kailee Favaro

  1. 1. Japan Kailee Favaro and Taylor Lacey
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>We decided to do a variety of stuff on Japan. The following slides are some examples of topics we find interesting. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Kimono <ul><li>Kimono means things to wear. </li></ul><ul><li>Today, a Japanese women usually owns only one kimono which she wears on her 19 th birthday. </li></ul><ul><li>They don’t wear them as everyday clothing anymore. Elders do sometimes. </li></ul><ul><li>Jun-hitoe, twelve unlined robes were frequently worn with the sleeve edges and collars showing the shades of each kimono. </li></ul><ul><li>Kosode – small sleeve was introduced in the kimono in the Kamakura period of 1185-1133. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Ramen <ul><li>Ramen noodles are as thin as spaghetti. </li></ul><ul><li>The soup that they are served in depends on your religion, city and even vendor. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s very inexpensive and very available. </li></ul><ul><li>They most popular soups with ramen are Shoyu Ramen, Miso Ramen, Shio Ramen, and Tonkotsu Ramen. </li></ul><ul><li>Ramen is usually offered in Japan with gyozo and soya. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Calligraphy <ul><li>A calligraphy set consists of Shitajiki which is a black, soft mat. </li></ul><ul><li>Bunchin which is a metal stick to weight down the paper during writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Hanshi which is special thin calligraphy paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Fude which is a brush. </li></ul><ul><li>Suzuri which is a heavy black container for the ink. </li></ul><ul><li>Sumi which is solid black material that must be rubbed in water in the suzuri to produce black ink. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Sumo Wrestling <ul><li>Sumo is the national sport of Japan. </li></ul><ul><li>Two sumo wrestlers fight in the sumo ring (dohyo). </li></ul><ul><li>The rules are that the one who first makes his opponent step outside of the ring or makes him touch the ground with any part of his body wins. </li></ul><ul><li>There are six divisions: Makuuchi, Juryo, Makushita, Sandanme, Jonidan, and Jonokuchi. </li></ul><ul><li>There are six majors tournaments: basho, haru-basho, natsu-basho, Nagoya-bacho, aki-basha, and Kyushu-basho. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Tea Ceremony <ul><li>Chaji is a full tea presentation with a meal. </li></ul><ul><li>As in virtually every tea ceremony, the host may spend days going over minutiae to insure that this ceremony will be perfect. </li></ul><ul><li>Through tea, recognition is given that every human encounter is a singular occasion which can, and will, never recur again exactly. </li></ul><ul><li>Thus every aspect of tea must be savored for what it gives the participants. </li></ul><ul><li>The ceremony takes place in a room designed and designated for tea. It is called the chashitsu. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Miso <ul><li>Miso is soy bean paste. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s made by fermenting soy beans with salt and koji. Koji are fermented grains like rice, barley, and soy beans. </li></ul><ul><li>It takes 10 months to a year. </li></ul><ul><li>The most common types of miso are shiro (white) miso, and aka (red) miso. </li></ul><ul><li>The white varieties aren’t really white, they’re light yellow and they’re sweet. </li></ul><ul><li>The red varieties are dark brown and salty. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Buddhism <ul><li>Monks have traveled to the mainland bringing back Buddhist teachings and practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Also they brought back Chinese cultural traditions. </li></ul><ul><li>It didn’t come to Japan very popular. It was only accepted by the imperial court. </li></ul><ul><li>Buddhism was often associated with magic powers and was used in court as means of preventing or curing diseases. </li></ul><ul><li>Buddhism did not replace kami, however, recognized their existence and power. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Kendo <ul><li>Kendo is the art and sport of Japanese stick fencing. </li></ul><ul><li>Swordsmanship was vital to samurais (warriors) in ancient Japan. </li></ul><ul><li>Established in 1952. </li></ul><ul><li>In kendo matches, athletes wear protective equipment covering them from head to hips. </li></ul><ul><li>Competitors jab the opponent's throat or strike the head, trunk, wrist with their sword (shinai). Points are scored for each jab, and the first to score two out of three points wins the match. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Bathing <ul><li>Japanese take showers more than baths. </li></ul><ul><li>there are two purposes to taking a bath: cleaning your body and relaxing your body. </li></ul><ul><li>Bathers sit on stools and wash their bodies using an attached shower head and hose. </li></ul><ul><li>Once you have finished rinsing off all soap and shampoo, step into the bath tub for a nice, relaxing soak. </li></ul><ul><li>It is a wonderful feeling to soak in a nice hot bath and relax your muscles at the end of the day. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Bowing <ul><li>Knowing how to bow in Japan might help you while you are traveling. </li></ul><ul><li>Bowing (ojigi) is a very important custom in Japan. Japanese people bow all the time. </li></ul><ul><li>It is impolite not to return a bow to whoever bowed to you. </li></ul><ul><li>Bowing expresses the feeling of respect, thanking, apologizing, greeting, and so on. </li></ul><ul><li>It's a convenient and important custom for you to learn. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Shinto <ul><li>Shinto means &quot;the way of the gods”. </li></ul><ul><li>It is the indigenous faith of the Japanese people and as old as Japan itself. </li></ul><ul><li>It remains Japan's major religion alongside Buddhism. </li></ul><ul><li>Shinto does not have a founder nor does it have sacred scriptures like the sutras or the bible. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Shinto gods&quot; are called kami. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Origami <ul><li>Origami is a form of visual / sculptural representation. </li></ul><ul><li>It is defined primarily by the folding of the medium (usually paper). </li></ul><ul><li>As for the word itself, it is commonly known that the word is Japanese in origin; oru means &quot;to fold“. </li></ul><ul><li>kami means &quot;paper&quot;. </li></ul><ul><li>The folding of paper was not always called origami. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Arranged Marriages <ul><li>Arranged marriages in Japan are now in the minority. </li></ul><ul><li>Over 70% of Japanese marriages are based on love. </li></ul><ul><li>The remaining 30% are arranged – or what the Japanese call “omiai.” </li></ul><ul><li>An integral part of omiai is a nakodo – a person who serves as a go-between between parents and children. </li></ul><ul><li>When the nakodo decides it is a good match, a meeting is then arranged between man and woman; parents of both are normally present during the first meeting. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Eating and Drinking <ul><li>In Japan, you say &quot;itadakimasu&quot; (&quot;I gratefully receive&quot;) before eating. </li></ul><ul><li>They say&quot;gochisosama (deshita)&quot; (&quot;Thank you for the meal&quot;) after finishing the meal. </li></ul><ul><li>When drinking alcoholic beverages, it is customary to serve each other, rather than pouring your own beverage. </li></ul><ul><li>Likewise, if someone wants to serve you more alcohol, you should quickly empty your glass and hold it toward the person. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not start drinking until everybody at the table is served and the glasses are raised for a drinking salute, which usually is &quot;kampai”. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Ikebana <ul><li>Ikebana is the art of arranging flowers aesthetically. </li></ul><ul><li>One tries to represent the three elements sky, earth, and mankind in a well balanced relation. </li></ul><ul><li>Ikebana developed in the 16 th century </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional Ikebana is called Kado. </li></ul><ul><li>There are many different schools of traditional Ikebana. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Sashimi <ul><li>Sashimi is thinly sliced, raw seafood. </li></ul><ul><li>Many different kinds of fresh fish and seafood are served raw in the Japanese cuisine. </li></ul><ul><li>Sashimi, while similar to iSushi, is distinct for its absence of vinigered rice. </li></ul><ul><li>When slices of fish are served on top of a small ball of rice, it is called nigri zushi. </li></ul><ul><li>Sashimi is usually beautifully arranged and served on top of shredded daikon and shiso leaving. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Kabuki <ul><li>Kabuki is a traditional Japanese form of theater with its origins in the Edo period. </li></ul><ul><li>Kabuki plays are about historical events, moral conflicts in love relationships and the like. </li></ul><ul><li>The actors use an old fashioned language which is difficult to understand even for some Japanese people. </li></ul><ul><li>They speak in a monotonous voice and are accompanied by traditional Japanese instruments. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Ukiyo-e <ul><li>Ukiyo-e means &quot;pictures of the floating world“. </li></ul><ul><li>It originated in the metropolitan culture of Edo (Tokyo) during the period of Japanese history. </li></ul><ul><li>It is an art closely connected with the pleasures of theatres, restaurants, teahouses, geisha and courtesans in the even then very large city. </li></ul><ul><li>Many ukiyo-e prints by artists like Utamaro and Sharaku were in fact posters. </li></ul><ul><li>Japanese love of nature, and ukiyo-e artists like Hokusai and Hiroshige have had an enormous impact on landscape painting all over the world . </li></ul>

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