Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh

984

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
984
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  1. Livelihood impact of aquaculture on the poor: Experience from Bangladesh WorldFish Center - Bangladesh and South Asia KM Jahan and Benoy Barman
  2. Introduction: Aquaculture and the poor <ul><li>The ability of the poor to engage in aquaculture or to derive a benefit from aquaculture activities has been questioned </li></ul><ul><li>Constraints to involve poor in aquaculture </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Limited access to resources </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Availability and high price of external inputs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>capital investment. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>This study shows that aquaculture can contribute to improving the livelihoods of the poor </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Adivasi Fisheries Project (AFP) supported by EU </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP) supported by USAID </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP) <ul><li>Duration : 2000 – 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Poor farmers having resources for aquaculture </li></ul><ul><li>68,000 farmers benefitted (Direct: 44,000; Secondary adopters:24,000) </li></ul><ul><li>42 out 64 districts in Bangladesh </li></ul>
  4. Adivasi Fisheries Project (AFP) <ul><li>Duration : 2007 – 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Poor and landless Adivasi farmers </li></ul><ul><li>9,650 Adivasi farmers benefitted (Direct: 3,650; Secondary adopters: 6,000) </li></ul><ul><li>3 district of northwest and 2 district of the northern region </li></ul>
  5. Capacity building activities and extension approaches <ul><li>Technology dissemination through partners (NGOs) </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge development of the communities through </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Group approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Farmer Field School (FFS) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Whole family approach to increase women participation </li></ul><ul><li>Asset development of the poor communities </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthening linkage with Local Support Agencies and stakeholders </li></ul>
  6. Livelihood diversification strategies <ul><li>Strengthening the aquaculture value chain (AFP) </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting small-scale aquaculture options (DSAP & AFP) </li></ul>Pond fish culture Rice- fish culture Cage culture Fingerling Trader Fish selling Netting group
  7. Livelihood Outcomes <ul><li>Productivity increased from pond and rice field (mt/ha) </li></ul><ul><li>Income (US$/hh) increased from aquaculture and related activities </li></ul><ul><li>Contribution of fish in hh income increased to 14% - 15% from 3% - 7% of before intervention (DSAP & AFP) </li></ul>Projects Before Project After project Control DSAP 1.3 2.7 1.7 AFP 0.9 2.8 - Projects Before Project After project Control DSAP 134 252 121 AFP 17 124 -
  8. Livelihood Outcomes (contd.) <ul><li>Fish consumption (gm/capita/day) improved. </li></ul><ul><li>Frequency of fish consumption of hh increased from 6 meals/month to 32 meals/month (AFP) </li></ul><ul><li>Shorten food deficit period from 1.8 months to 1.1 months after project intervention (AFP) </li></ul><ul><li>Carps contributed 70% of total fish consumption. Only 6-7% came from nutrient dense small fish (DSAP) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Aquaculture development dominated by carps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>94% of ponds are under carp polyculture (village census, DSAP) </li></ul></ul>Projects Before Project After project Control DSAP 42 60 41 AFP 17 36 -
  9. Livelihood Outcomes (contd.) <ul><li>Whole family approach successfully involved women in aquaculture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Participation rate increased to 37% - 40% compared to baseline of 25% - 27% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Women operated ponds received higher production compared to men (2.9 mt/ha compared to2.7 mt/ha) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HH consumption of women operated ponds were 1.84 kg/capita/month compared to 1.79 kg/capita/month of men operated ponds </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Access to extension agencies and market improved </li></ul><ul><ul><li>20% - 30% more hh has now access to extension agencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>40%-50% more hh has now access to input/output market </li></ul></ul>
  10. Conclusion <ul><li>Results suggest that with adequate support, aquaculture could also contribute significantly to increase livelihood outcomes of the poor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope for involve poor in aquaculture value chains </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Required poor focused development program </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Aquaculture development dominated by larger fish species (e.g., carp) reason for declining trend of small fish species </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote production of smaller species alongside large carp species may be an alternative options </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gender focus extension approaches found effective in increasing women involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Networking with extension agencies and other stakeholders is important for sustainability </li></ul>
  11. Thank You

×