Improving nutrient-rich small fish availability, access
and consumption within the framework of the
Bangladesh Country Inv...
Presentation Outline
• Bangladesh Country Investment Plan
• Nutrition situation in Bangladesh
• Fish production and consum...
Bangladesh has been an early adopter of the comprehensive approach to food security and nutrition
through the formulation ...
Responding to L’Aquila Initiative and in line
with the 5 Principles agreed in the Rome
Food Summit, the CIP was approved i...
Where does CIP come from
• CIP = Government’s investment plan - a living
document
• One umbrella for the key investment re...
Purposes of the CIP
• Integrate and coordinate actions for food
security and nutrition
• Harmonize development partner (DP...
CIP: 12 Programs and 40 Subprograms
COMPONENT PROGRAMME
Food
Availability
1. Sustainable and diversified agriculture throu...
• Expected outcome : Sustainable increase of fishery production through
improved technology and natural resources manageme...
• Expected outcome : Community nutrition improvement is supported by
strengthened National Nutrition Services (NNS)
Propos...
CIP Programme-4: Fishery and aquaculture
(Source: NFP PoA & CIP Monitoring Report-2013)
• Fishery production continues gro...
Poverty and under nutrition trends in Bangladesh
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
1988...
Quintile H/A
% < - 2SD
STUNTING
W/H % < - 2 SD
WASTING
W/A % < - 2SD
UNDERWEIGHT
Lowest 53.7 17.5 50.3
Second 45.4 16.2 41...
Relative dietary energy contribution (En%) of
cereals and rice to Bangladesh diet
Source/Year Energy intake
(kcal)
Cereal ...
Consumption of total food, cereal and non
cereals
913.8
893.06
947.75
999.99
498
475.78
451.72 442.1
415.8 417.28
496.03
5...
Content of food basket: improving
diversity
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
500
2005 2010
Rice
Wheat
Vegetables
Pulse...
Micronutrient deficiency situation
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
5.4
26
7.1
42.1
57.3
20.5
33.1
10.7
40
44.6
Women (NPNL)
Pre-school...
Fish and human nutrition
• Highly nutritious, tasty and easily digestible
• Source of protein and micronutrients
• Rich in...
Nutrient content in some Bangladeshi common fishes (%)
(Source: Food Composition Table for Bangladesh 2013, INFS & CARS,DU...
18
17.4
17.1
15.4
18.2
15.3
20.8
16.6
17.2
15.9
0 5 10 15 20 25
Ilish(Hilsha)
Sorputi(Barb, olive)
Mola-eyes included
Chap...
2.44
2.56
2.7
2.9
3.06
3.26
3.39
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
Production of Fish
Production of Fish(m
MT)
Consumption of Fish
34.5
43.8
38.5 42.1
49.4
60
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
1991-92 1995-96 2000 2005 2010 Desirable
intake(Bir...
NUTRITION SENSITIVE AGRICULTURE
Pro-nutrition agricultural interventions
 “Ekti Bari Ekti Khamar “ project implemented by BRDB, RDCD supports
household b...
Conclusion
• Integrated agriculture ( including fisheries) and health
based interventions should be scaled up for the
impr...
Thank you
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Improving Nutrient-rich Small Fish Availability, Access and Consumption within the Framework of the Bangladesh Country Investment Plan. By Mostafa Faruq Al Banna, Associate Research Director, FPMU, Ministry of Food.

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Fish and Nutrition Workshop Day 1 (Inaugural Sessions)

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Improving Nutrient-rich Small Fish Availability, Access and Consumption within the Framework of the Bangladesh Country Investment Plan. By Mostafa Faruq Al Banna, Associate Research Director, FPMU, Ministry of Food.

  1. 1. Improving nutrient-rich small fish availability, access and consumption within the framework of the Bangladesh Country Investment Plan Mostafa Faruq Al Banna Associate Research Director FPMU, Ministry Food Workshop on “Production and Sustainable Management of Nutrient-rich Small Fish (SIS) in Ponds and Wetlands for Improved Nutrition in South Asia” organized by WorldFish on 1 March 2014
  2. 2. Presentation Outline • Bangladesh Country Investment Plan • Nutrition situation in Bangladesh • Fish production and consumption • Fish and human nutrition • Conclusion
  3. 3. Bangladesh has been an early adopter of the comprehensive approach to food security and nutrition through the formulation of the National Food Policy (2006) and its Plan of Action (2008) The framework for food security and nutrition interventions: the National Food Policy and its Plan of Action The National Food Policy Plan of Action consisting of 26 areas of intervention and 314 actions provides a comprehensive long-term (2008-2015) framework for: - Coordinating government interventions - Aligning development support to national priorities in line with the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness - Regularly monitoring progress toward food security in line with MDG1 -Identifying needs for investments To reduce undernourishment, stunting and underweight, food should be available, accessible and complemented by nutrition interventions Access NutritionAvailability
  4. 4. Responding to L’Aquila Initiative and in line with the 5 Principles agreed in the Rome Food Summit, the CIP was approved in 2010 and revised in 2011 based on extensive consultations.  It is a coherent set of 12 strategic priority investment programmes allowing to coordinate Government and Development Partners interventions  It is aligned with MDG1, NFP PoA and the Sixth Five Year Plan It focuses on investments included in the Annual Development Budget The framework for Ag, FS &N interventions: The Country Investment Plan The CIP and PoA provide the framework for monitoring impacts, implementation and financial commitments
  5. 5. Where does CIP come from • CIP = Government’s investment plan - a living document • One umbrella for the key investment requirements to develop agriculture, and improve food and nutrition security • Prioritize, harmonize, and build on existing documents: NFP /PoA, sector programmes, sixth 5-year plan, ADP, MTBF
  6. 6. Purposes of the CIP • Integrate and coordinate actions for food security and nutrition • Harmonize development partner (DP) activities with the CIP • Mobilize more financial resources from: – Government budget resources – Private investment – international sources
  7. 7. CIP: 12 Programs and 40 Subprograms COMPONENT PROGRAMME Food Availability 1. Sustainable and diversified agriculture through integrated research and extension 2. Improved water resource management and infrastructure for irrigation purposes 3. Improved quality of input and soil fertility 4. Fisheries and aquaculture development 5. Livestock development, with a focus on poultry and dairy production Food Access 6. Improved access to markets, value-addition in agriculture and to non farm incomes 7. Strengthened capacities for implementation and monitoring of NFP and CIP actions 8. Enhanced public food management systems 9. Institutional development and capacity development for more effective safety nets Food Utilization 10. Community based nutrition programs and services 11. Orient food and nutrition programs through data 12. Food safety and quality improvement
  8. 8. • Expected outcome : Sustainable increase of fishery production through improved technology and natural resources management Proposed focus & priority interventions : • Develop small scale aquaculture through access to quality inputs, advice and skills • Improve management of fisheries resources • Develop public private partnerships in support of infrastructure and service development • Promote production in the South through sustainable shrimp and prawn development and community-based co-management of wetland • Additional considerations: Multi sectoral collaboration, involve community based organizations of farmers and fishers as well as private sectors. Programme 4: Fisheries and Aquaculture Development
  9. 9. • Expected outcome : Community nutrition improvement is supported by strengthened National Nutrition Services (NNS) Proposed focus & priority interventions : • CBNP linked to NNS that deliver a package of basic health and nutrition services/activities including micronutrient supplementation, BCC, antenatal care • Support community based efforts of homestead gardening, horticulture, small livestock, fisheries and BCC for improved nutrition • Link long-term with immediate treatment of acute malnutrition in particular through therapeutic and supplementary feeding and BCC focus on maternal and young child nutrition • Additional considerations: Multi sectoral collaboration, synergies with SUN framework, REACH, Project Laser Beam and MDG –F programme Programme 10: Community based nutrition programmes and Services
  10. 10. CIP Programme-4: Fishery and aquaculture (Source: NFP PoA & CIP Monitoring Report-2013) • Fishery production continues growing at sustained rates • Fishery share of agricultural GDP expanded as result of faster growth Indicators 2007/08 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 GDP from fishery sector as % of agriculture GDP (excluding forest), at constant price 1995-1996 24.4% 24.2% 24.2% 24.9% Annual change in national fish production 5.0% 7.3% 5.7% 6.5%  Sustainably increase aquaculture productivity  Implement national breeding plan and law on hatchery management  Enhance research, extension and training  Minimizing the impact of shrimp culture on soil quality and biodiversity  Utilization of roadside canals and ditches for increasing fish production  Promoting rice-fish farming system  Reinforce community based fishery management of open water
  11. 11. Poverty and under nutrition trends in Bangladesh 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Constant2005internationaldollars Percent Poverty headcount Prevalence of Stunting Prevalence of Underweight Prevalence of Wasting Prevalence of undernourishment (%) PPP GDP per capita (right axis)
  12. 12. Quintile H/A % < - 2SD STUNTING W/H % < - 2 SD WASTING W/A % < - 2SD UNDERWEIGHT Lowest 53.7 17.5 50.3 Second 45.4 16.2 41.6 Middle 40.7 17.7 36.0 Fourth 35.9 13.6 27.5 Highest 25.7 12.1 20.9 Nutritional status of U5 children by wealth quintile in Bangladesh, DHS, 2011
  13. 13. Relative dietary energy contribution (En%) of cereals and rice to Bangladesh diet Source/Year Energy intake (kcal) Cereal (g) En % Rice (g) En % HIES 2005 2238 452 73% 440 68% HIES 2010 2318 442 66% 416 64%
  14. 14. Consumption of total food, cereal and non cereals 913.8 893.06 947.75 999.99 498 475.78 451.72 442.1 415.8 417.28 496.03 557.89 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1995-96 2000 2005 2010 Total food Cereal Non-cereal
  15. 15. Content of food basket: improving diversity 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 2005 2010 Rice Wheat Vegetables Pulses Oil Fish Meat/eggs
  16. 16. Micronutrient deficiency situation 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 5.4 26 7.1 42.1 57.3 20.5 33.1 10.7 40 44.6 Women (NPNL) Pre-school children
  17. 17. Fish and human nutrition • Highly nutritious, tasty and easily digestible • Source of protein and micronutrients • Rich in bioavailable calcium • Rich in vitamin A, vitamin B Complex, iron, zinc • Marine fish is a good source of iodine and omega- 3 fatty acids • Addition of oil, vegetables and spices in fish preparation improves dietary diversity and nutritional quality
  18. 18. Nutrient content in some Bangladeshi common fishes (%) (Source: Food Composition Table for Bangladesh 2013, INFS & CARS,DU,MoFood/FAO/EU/USAID) Fish name in Bengali (English name) Energy (Kcal) Protein (gm) Fat (gm) Calcium (mg) Iron (mg) Phosphorus (mg) Zinc (mg) Ilish without bones (Hilsha) 223 18.0 16.8 86 1.3 195 0.54 Sorputi(Barb, olive) 175 17.4 11.7 227 0.6 151 0.74 Mola-eyes included (Mola carplet) 108 17.1 4.4 767 3.8 440 3.19 Chapila (Indian river shad) 106 15.4 4.9 1060 4.8 560 1.97 Tengra (Day’s mystus)-eyes included, combined species 114 18.2 4.6 627 2.8 348 0.77 Tatkini (Stone roller) 97 15.3 3.9 195 2.2 124 1.09 Tilapia (Tilapia without bones) 110 20.8 3.0 19 0.5 350 1.40 Rui (Ruhi from river) 90 16.6 2.7 650 0.5 133 1.01 Shing, without bones (stringing catfish) 101 17.2 3.5 319 2.1 304 0.55 Pangas, without bones 162 15.9 11.0 14 0.1 130 1.85
  19. 19. 18 17.4 17.1 15.4 18.2 15.3 20.8 16.6 17.2 15.9 0 5 10 15 20 25 Ilish(Hilsha) Sorputi(Barb, olive) Mola-eyes included Chapila(Indian river shad) Tengra-eye included(Day'a mystus) Tatkini (Stone roller) Tilapia-without bones Rui(Ruhi from river) Shing, without bones(stringing… Pangas, without bones Protein content in selected fish species (g%) Protein (gm)
  20. 20. 2.44 2.56 2.7 2.9 3.06 3.26 3.39 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 Production of Fish Production of Fish(m MT)
  21. 21. Consumption of Fish 34.5 43.8 38.5 42.1 49.4 60 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1991-92 1995-96 2000 2005 2010 Desirable intake(Birdem, 2013) Fish intake(gm)
  22. 22. NUTRITION SENSITIVE AGRICULTURE
  23. 23. Pro-nutrition agricultural interventions  “Ekti Bari Ekti Khamar “ project implemented by BRDB, RDCD supports household based comprehensive food systems  Crop Diversification Programme (CDP) implemented by Ministry of Agriculture to promote non-cereal crop production and consumption through research and extension activities  Provision of credit to women for engagement in subsistence based poultry and livestock farming: 40% of the micro-credit (reached 16 million households) is used for this activity  Pond aquaculture through converting low-lying lands into fish ponds; 12% per year growth over the last decade  Scaling up of HKI piloted homestead food production involving women: covers 4% of the population in 240 of the 466 sub-districts  BRAC organized tenant farmer development project through informal associations ,to provide access to credit and extension; 350,000 tenant farms (one-fourth women) have been organized in 1,600 village associations that meet every month
  24. 24. Conclusion • Integrated agriculture ( including fisheries) and health based interventions should be scaled up for the improvement of diets and nutrition • Small and medium scale aquaculture to improve availability, accessibility and utilization of small fish should be encouraged. • Use of fish should be promoted especially in complementary feeding, diets of pregnant women and adolescent girls apart from household diets. • Fish production and consumption should be optimized as outlined in the framework of CIP • Community based management of open water fisheries should be promoted as part of enabling policies.
  25. 25. Thank you
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