Practitioner Perspectives - Impact investing in small-scale aquaculture enterprises

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Presentation by Arun Padiyar from Mogalthur Aqua Famer's Welfare Society India, presented at the Seafood Summit 2012 in Hong Kong, 7 September, 2012.

Presentation by Arun Padiyar from Mogalthur Aqua Famer's Welfare Society India, presented at the Seafood Summit 2012 in Hong Kong, 7 September, 2012.

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  • 1. Impact  inves-ng  in  small-­‐scale  aquaculture  enterprises:   Prac--oner  perspec-ves     Arun  Padiyar   Mogalthur  Aqua  Farmer’s  Welfare  Society,  India   arunpadiyar@gmail.com  
  • 2. Three  experiences  •  Export  oriented,  high-­‐value  commodity   (shrimp)   –  Indian  Shrimp  farmer  Socie-es   –  Indonesian  aquaculture  •  Domes-c  market  oriented,  low-­‐value   commodity   –  Milkfish  value  chain  development  in  India    
  • 3. Small-­‐scale  Shrimp  farming  in  India   and  Aceh  •  Public  sector  investment   –  India  (2001  onwards)  :     •  MPEDA,  Govt.  of  India  and  NACA   –  Aceh  (2007  onwards)  :     •  MMAF,  Govt.  of  Indonesia,  IGO,   NGO  and  donors  (ADB,  ACIAR,   FAO,  ARC,  WorldFish,  NACA,  WWF,   OISCA)    
  • 4. Investment  Objec-ves  and  Ac-ons  •  Objec2ve   –  Improved  livelihoods  through  sustainable   aquaculture  •  Ac2ons   –  Promo-on  of  Be5er  Management  Prac2ces  (BMPs)   –  Organizing  farmers  for  Cluster  Management   (farmer  groups  /  Socie-es  /  Kelompoks)   •  Extension  services  to  farmers    
  • 5. Progress  in  Aceh   2007   2008   2009   2010  Villages   11   34   84   93  Farmers   47   260   1135   2639  Hectares   22   184   1027   2441  
  • 6. Environmental  and  Social  Impacts  •  Social: –  Democratic and transparent societies –  Increased in communication among stakeholders and along the value chain –  Sharing of cost for common cause –  Harmony among farmers and other local resource users•  Environmental –  Efficient use of resources (feed and energy) –  Reduced use of chemicals –  Reduced discharge of contaminated water into waterways –  Increased awareness among stakeholders on environmental care
  • 7. Lessons  learned  •  There  can  be  significant  impacts,  but:   –  It  takes  -me  for  solid  results   •  Slow  change  in  Knowledge,  actude  and  prac-ce  among   farmers   –  Good  and  reliable  services  at  grass-­‐root  brings  the   real  change   –  Finding  good  “lead  farmers”  is  important   –  Working  with  all  the  stakeholders  along  the  value   chain  can  bring  beder  and  quick  results   –  Direct  financial/in-­‐kind  support  to  farmers  brought   nega-ve  results.  
  • 8. Current  opportunity  •  Public  Private  Partnership   –  Cer-fica-on,  Branding  and  Marke-ng  the  Society/ Kelompok  shrimps  in  interna-onal  markets.   –  Widening  the  programme  (BMP,  cluster  management)   to  include  other  locally  farmed  species  (carps,   pangasius,  scampi,  seabass,  crab  etc).   –  Domes-c  market  development   •  Marke-ng  farm  inputs  (Feed,  seed,  fer-lisers  etc)     •  Marke-ng  of  farm  out-­‐put  (fish  and  shrimp  sale  in  domes-c   market).   9  
  • 9. Milkfish  value  chain  development  in   India  
  • 10. Issues  in   Consumer  Perspec2ves   Solu2ons  from  fish  market   business  Price   High  prices  of  marine  fish   Affordable  fish         •   especially  Marine  fish     •   <100-­‐150  Rs/kg  at  retail   (150-­‐1000  Rs/kg  at  retail)  Supply   Inconsistent    &   Consistent    &   unsustainable  supply   sustainable  supply   •   scarcity  and  erra-c  supply  of  fish   from  fish  farms   caused  by  overfishing  from  limited   wild  resources,  fishing  ban  and   climate  change  impact  Quality   Poor  quality  fish     Fresh  fish         •   due  to  prolonged  fishing  period   •   supplied  to  any  part  of   (3-­‐15  days),  poor  harvest  and  post-­‐ India  within  48  hours.   harvest  handling  by  tradi-onal   fisheries  prac-ces.   11  
  • 11. Value  proposi-on  of  the  investment  •  Affordable,  fresh,  sustainable  and  all-­‐-me   available  marine  fish  which  contributes  to  the   food  and  nutri-onal  security  of  India  and   South  Asia  and  helps  in  genera-ng   employment  especially  in  rural  areas.   12  
  • 12. Why  Milkfish  (Chanos  chanos)?  •  Easy  to  Farm:     –  Disease  resistant,  high  yielding  (10-­‐15  ton/ Hectare),  2-­‐10  months  of  crop  period   depending  on  market  size.  •  Widely  Adaptable:     –  Can  be  grown  in  seawater  as  well  as  in   freshwater.  Can  cater  to  Pan-­‐Indian   consumer  taste  buds.  •  Cost  effec-ve:     –  Cost  of  farm  produc-on  is  about  USD  1/kg.  •  Sustainable:     –  Depends  on  vegetable  based  feed  and  has   high  feed  conversion  efficiency  (1.2-­‐1.5  kg   feed  for  1  kg  fish  growth).   13  
  • 13. An-cipated     Investment  Impacts  •  Domes-c  fish  market  size  (2009)     (Source:  FAO  FishStat  2011)   –  USD  15  Billion   –  7    million  metric  ton  •  Es-mated  contribu-on  of  the  value  chain  proposi-on  to  fisheries  sector  at   its  maturity  (2020)   –  7.5%  by  value  and  quan-ty   –  i.e.,  USD  1.25  Billion  at  retail  and  527,000  metric  ton  of  milkfish   –  100,000  farmers  and  stakeholders  employed  along  the  value  chain    •  Es-mated  market  share  of  business  proposi-on  at  maturity  (2020)   –  0.35%  of  the  retail  value  of  the  fish  promoted  by  the  BP   –  i.e.,    USD  40  million/year  •  Es-mated  investment  requirement  on  business  proposi-on  (brood  bank   and  hatchery)     –  USD  3  million  over  10  years  
  • 14. Thank  you