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Successful Grant Writing Strategies<br />Presenters:  	Dr. Lisa Edwards<br />			Dean, Enterprise & Economic Development<br...
Who is in the audience?<br />Workforce?<br />Corporate?<br />Continuing Education?<br />Grant Writers?<br />All of the abo...
Disclaimer<br />The ideas and strategies provided in this presentation have worked for the presenters.  They may not be di...
Foundation Facts<br /><ul><li>75% of all proposals never get read
50% of all funding requests to foundations are inappropriate
80% of grants awarded by staffed foundations go to organizations that have had prior contact</li></ul>	Source: The Grantsm...
Foundation Facts<br />Foundations gave $45.6 billion in 2008<br />	Source:  The Foundation Center<br />The Chronicle for P...
Federal Grant Facts<br />Grants.gov reported 100,000 submissions in 2008 and 300,000 submissions  as of 9/18/2009<br />In ...
Step 1: Pre-Planning <br />Collect historical information about organization <br />Identify top 3-5 priorities<br />Determ...
Step 1: Pre-Planning Continued <br />4)  Gather quantitative data to document need and demand<br />5)   Assess institution...
Step 2:  Identify Potential Funding <br />Private Sector:  The Foundation Center<br />Private Sector:  Chronicle for Phila...
Step 3: Prioritize Funding Sources<br />Grant Source<br />Funding Available<br />Number of awards given  <br />When RFP wi...
Step 4: Create a Grant Calendar<br />Identify the date for the RFP to be posted<br />Date for the bidders conference or we...
Step 5: Research<br />Collect relevant reports<br />Identify associations, groups and other non-profits as partners<br />I...
Step 6: Writing the Grant<br />Convene key partners and staff to read the RFP <br /> Confirm eligibility to be fiscal agen...
Step 6: Writing the Grant Continued<br />Review the size and scope of previously funded projects<br />Confirm institutiona...
Step 6: Writing the Grant Continued<br />Designate one person to be lead writer and others to be contributors so language ...
Step 6: Writing the Grant Continued<br />Use Arial Narrow to get more words per page<br />Use 1.5 spacing if allowed inste...
Step 7: Executive Summary and Case Statement<br />First sentence identifies applicant, key partners and what you will do<b...
Step 7: Budget<br />Allocate dollars for those will do the work<br />Dedicate funds for support staff and fiscal staff <br...
Step 8:  Letters of Support<br />Plan to write 3-5 different letter templates<br />Allow two weeks for letters to be writt...
Step 9:  Review<br />Have at least three colleagues read the proposal<br />Have two staff “cold read” the proposal for bas...
Step 10: Assembly<br />Decide what needs to go in the body of the proposal and what can go in the Appendix<br />Use color ...
Step 10: Assembly<br />Send a copy of the proposal with a thank you letter to each partner and participating staff member ...
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NCCET Webinar - Successful and Essential Grant Writing Strategies

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Learn the key strategies for writing and submitting winning proposals for private and federal funding sources from two successful grant writers who have secured over $10 million in grants. Acquire insider tips for developing a grant concept, securing partners, interpreting RFP’s and how to squeeze more content into page limits. Discover how to build relationships with funding sources that will continue beyond the original grant award. Learn more at http://www.NCCET.org

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  • Annalee
  • Annalee Define each of the topics.Time for Q & A at the end of the presentation Burning questions please feel free to ask us and we will let you know if we will be covering it later in the presentation, answer it now or if we may save it until the end.
  • Annalee Define each of the topics.Time for Q & A at the end of the presentation Burning questions please feel free to ask us and we will let you know if we will be covering it later in the presentation, answer it now or if we may save it until the end.
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  • Lisa
  • Lisa
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  • Cheryl Why Mandatory Customer Service Training ?Development of Red and Blue Dot Modules?Previous Deliver Methods?Why change the delivery process?
  • AnnaleeTCC became part of a State-wide consortium of colleges Coordinated the Retail Management Certificate with the Western Association of Food Chains.
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  • AnnaleeDuring this portion of the presentation we will cover:
  • AnnaleeThese are not traditional transfer degrees. designed by an active Business advisory committee reviews the programs at least 2X a year decide the curriculum based on current market needs. students hit the ground running at the end of the certificates or degrees.The degree will articulate with some 4 year colleges. Upside down—students have specialized and transfer for the general studies portion. Business Degree is intended for employees in the front of the house. leadership skills and the essentials of teamwork maximizing revenue and controlling costssmall business owner including a business plane-tailing class, project management and a marketing class that requires a marketing plan.Logistics degree focuses on the back of the house and supply chainlogistics, warehousing and inventory managementtransportation and distributionVery competitive National Science Foundation grant.Both degrees have an internship.
  • AnnaleeThese are not traditional transfer degrees. designed by an active Business advisory committee reviews the programs at least 2X a year decide the curriculum based on current market needs. students hit the ground running at the end of the certificates or degrees.The degree will articulate with some 4 year colleges. Upside down—students have specialized and transfer for the general studies portion. Business Degree is intended for employees in the front of the house. leadership skills and the essentials of teamwork maximizing revenue and controlling costssmall business owner including a business plane-tailing class, project management and a marketing class that requires a marketing plan.Logistics degree focuses on the back of the house and supply chainlogistics, warehousing and inventory managementtransportation and distributionVery competitive National Science Foundation grant.Both degrees have an internship.
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  • Transcript of "NCCET Webinar - Successful and Essential Grant Writing Strategies"

    1. 1. Successful Grant Writing Strategies<br />Presenters: Dr. Lisa Edwards<br /> Dean, Enterprise & Economic Development<br /> Dr. Erin Hoiland<br /> Grants Manager<br /> NCCET Annual Conference<br />
    2. 2. Who is in the audience?<br />Workforce?<br />Corporate?<br />Continuing Education?<br />Grant Writers?<br />All of the above?<br />
    3. 3. Disclaimer<br />The ideas and strategies provided in this presentation have worked for the presenters. They may not be directly applicable to your college. Or, they may need to be tweaked and adapted to your institutional culture. <br />
    4. 4. Foundation Facts<br /><ul><li>75% of all proposals never get read
    5. 5. 50% of all funding requests to foundations are inappropriate
    6. 6. 80% of grants awarded by staffed foundations go to organizations that have had prior contact</li></ul> Source: The Grantsmanship Center<br />
    7. 7. Foundation Facts<br />Foundations gave $45.6 billion in 2008<br /> Source: The Foundation Center<br />The Chronicle for Philanthropy posts more than $200 million in grants every two weeks<br /> Source: The Chronicle for Philanthropy <br />
    8. 8. Federal Grant Facts<br />Grants.gov reported 100,000 submissions in 2008 and 300,000 submissions as of 9/18/2009<br />In 2008, 26 federal grant making agencies awarded almost $30 billion in grants<br />Source: Grants.gov<br />
    9. 9. Step 1: Pre-Planning <br />Collect historical information about organization <br />Identify top 3-5 priorities<br />Determine alignment of priorities with mission, vision and core strategic initiatives<br />Secure decision-maker commitment to support priorities<br />
    10. 10. Step 1: Pre-Planning Continued <br />4) Gather quantitative data to document need and demand<br />5) Assess institutional capacity for grants<br />6) Identify staff who can help with writing, and program planning<br />
    11. 11. Step 2: Identify Potential Funding <br />Private Sector: The Foundation Center<br />Private Sector: Chronicle for Philanthropy <br />Federal Grants: www.grants.gov<br />The Federal Register <br />Other? <br />
    12. 12. Step 3: Prioritize Funding Sources<br />Grant Source<br />Funding Available<br />Number of awards given <br />When RFP will be released<br />Timeline for Application<br />Critical Partners <br />Contact Grant Manager/ Program Director<br />
    13. 13. Step 4: Create a Grant Calendar<br />Identify the date for the RFP to be posted<br />Date for the bidders conference or webinar <br />Date for notice of intent<br />Date for uploading or mailing submission<br />Due date for grant <br />Notification date for awardees<br />
    14. 14. Step 5: Research<br />Collect relevant reports<br />Identify associations, groups and other non-profits as partners<br />Identify government agencies to support concept<br />
    15. 15. Step 6: Writing the Grant<br />Convene key partners and staff to read the RFP <br /> Confirm eligibility to be fiscal agent and grant lead<br />Focus on anything that gives awardees extra points/ special consideration<br />Identify focus of project- KEEP IT SIMPLE<br />
    16. 16. Step 6: Writing the Grant Continued<br />Review the size and scope of previously funded projects<br />Confirm institutional commitment to concept<br />Contact previous awardees to get copies of their grant applications<br />Plan 6 staff hours for each page of the application <br />
    17. 17. Step 6: Writing the Grant Continued<br />Designate one person to be lead writer and others to be contributors so language is consistent<br />Keep language simple- avoid education jargon<br />Repeat key concepts throughout the proposal <br />
    18. 18. Step 6: Writing the Grant Continued<br />Use Arial Narrow to get more words per page<br />Use 1.5 spacing if allowed instead of 2.0<br />Use colorful graphs and tables to illustrate information<br />Use headers and footers to put project title /page #<br />
    19. 19.
    20. 20.
    21. 21.
    22. 22. Step 7: Executive Summary and Case Statement<br />First sentence identifies applicant, key partners and what you will do<br />Second sentence explains who and how many will be served<br />Third sentence explains why you are doing it<br />Fourth sentence gives data to justify need:<br />“Every 26 seconds a high school student drops out in the United States” <br />
    23. 23. Step 7: Budget<br />Allocate dollars for those will do the work<br />Dedicate funds for support staff and fiscal staff <br /> Allocate money to grant partners<br />Allow for COLA’s for multiple year grants<br />Make sure narrative numbers match budget table<br />
    24. 24. Step 8: Letters of Support<br />Plan to write 3-5 different letter templates<br />Allow two weeks for letters to be written<br />Letters should clearly state what they have committed to do and equivalent dollar value<br />For federal grants, notify elected officials to not only write a letter, but to place phone calls to project directors<br />
    25. 25. Step 9: Review<br />Have at least three colleagues read the proposal<br />Have two staff “cold read” the proposal for basic grammatical structure and readability<br />Triple check all numbers to make sure they add up<br />
    26. 26. Step 10: Assembly<br />Decide what needs to go in the body of the proposal and what can go in the Appendix<br />Use color graphs and a color cover page if possible<br />Print at least 20 extra copies of the proposal. <br /> letters. <br />
    27. 27. Step 10: Assembly<br />Send a copy of the proposal with a thank you letter to each partner and participating staff member <br />Send a copy of the proposal to those who sent you copies of their proposal<br />Create a binder or file of the proposal and original letters. <br />
    28. 28. Q & A Period<br />
    29. 29. Thank you!<br />For More Information Contact: <br />Dr. Lisa Edwards<br />ledwards@tacomacc.edu / 253.566.5019<br />Dr. Erin Hoiland<br />ehoiland@tacomacc.edu/ 253-566-5005<br />

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