• Save
NCCET Webinar - Ill Prepared Workforce Presentation For Nccet
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

NCCET Webinar - Ill Prepared Workforce Presentation For Nccet

on

  • 943 views

NCCET Webinar - Ill Prepared Workforce Presentation

NCCET Webinar - Ill Prepared Workforce Presentation

Statistics

Views

Total Views
943
Views on SlideShare
924
Embed Views
19

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

3 Embeds 19

http://www.nccet.org 13
https://nccet.site-ym.com 4
http://nccet.site-ym.com 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

NCCET Webinar - Ill Prepared Workforce Presentation For Nccet NCCET Webinar - Ill Prepared Workforce Presentation For Nccet Presentation Transcript

  • The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
    Exploring the Challenges of Employer-Provided Workforce Readiness Training
  • A joint study by
    ASTD, The Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, and SHRM
  • The Study
    Data collected in 2008
    217 employers
    Examine corporate practices on training newly hired graduates
    3 educational levels
    High School
    Two-year College
    Four-year College
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Definitions used in survey
    Workforce Readiness Training
    Includes skills employers believe necessary to function effectively in workplace and that new entrants should have when hired. Sometimes referred to as “remedial training.”
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Definitions used in survey
    Job-Specific Training:
    Prepares employees to perform a specific function in an organization
    Career Development Training:
    Supports employees’ career advancement or promotional opportunities
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • The Problems:
    New hires lack basic workforce readiness skills
    Companies try to close the gap but do not achieve satisfactory results
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Almost half of employers provide workforce readiness training programs
    Programs are only “moderately” or “somewhat” successful at best
    Employers do not track expenses of these programs
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Programs offered do not meet company needs
    Leadership, teamwork, and IT training programs in place
    Applied and basic skills are lacking
    Basics: reading, writing, arithmetic
    Applied: critical thinking, problem solving
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Respondents report uneven success in workforce readiness programs: from deficiency to adequacy
    Not at all: 3.6%
    Somewhat: 30.9%
    Moderately: 23.6%
    Successful: 40.0%
    Very Successful: 1.8%
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Respondents report uneven success in workforce readiness programs: from adequacy to excellence
    Not at all: 3.5%
    Somewhat: 24.6%
    Moderately: 35.1%
    Successful: 19.3%
    Very Successful: 17.5%
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Gap between Need and Provision
    Training programs offered don’t meet employer’s greatest needs:
    91.7% report “high need” for Critical Thinking/Problem Solving skills
    55.9% report “high need” for basic skill of writing in English
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Five Applied Skill areas receiving “high need” rating by more than 40% of respondents
    Creativity/Innovation
    Ethics/Social Responsibility
    Professional/Work Ethic
    Lifelong Learning/Self-Direction
    Critical Thinking/Problem Solving
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Smaller gaps exist in IT Application, Leadership, and Teamwork/Collaboration
    25% or less of a gap between need and provision
    Smaller gaps also in Oral and Written Communications, Diversity
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Workforce readiness gaps most pronounced in applied skills
    Two major exceptions:
    Reading Comprehension
    Writing in English
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • What is the cost of an ill-prepared workforce?
    It’s hard to tell.
    Companies don’t separate workforce readiness training from new entrant training
    It’s done on an as-needed, ad hoc basis
    Often viewed as career development
    Blended with other types of training
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • For those who offer workforce readiness training and do track expenditures:
    19.1% of learning budget goes to workforce readiness training
    61.3 % goes to job-specific training
    19.7 % goes to career development
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • For those who don’t offer workforce readiness training and do track expenditures:
    66% goes to job-specific training
    34% goes to career development
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
    Potential path for workforce readiness:
    Informal Learning and Social Media
    Most companies who offer readiness training use informal learning and Web 2.0 technologies to facilitate training
  • Potential path for workforce readiness:
    Informal Learning and Social Media
    Use company intranet: 70.8 %
    Email: 63.1%
    Mentoring: 60.0%
    Coaching: 55.4%
    Open Agenda 53.8%
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Potential path for workforce readiness:
    Informal Learning and Social Media
    Self Learning Modules 47.7%
    Communities of Practice 21.5%
    Online Groups 18.5%
    Wikis 16.9%
    Podcasts 15.4%
    Social Networks 10.8%
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Potential path for workforce readiness:
    Informal Learning and Social Media
    Spontaneity and Effectiveness are top reasons for using informal learning activities
    Occur naturally 64.6%
    Cost effectiveness 63.1%
    Customization 47.7%
    Less Time 43.1%
    Quick Results 40.0%
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Success Stories and Best Practices
    CVS Caremark/TJX Companies, Inc.
    Northrop Grumman’s Apprentice School
    Yum! Brands
    Harper Industries
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Some companies do not hire and train unprepared new entrants.
    American Express has created a very specific, detailed hiring profile to assure its entrants have the right skills.
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Closing the Gap: Schools that Work
    High Tech High
    Interest-Based Learning
    Source; Tony Wagner, The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need—And What We Can Do About It, 2008.
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Improving Workforce Readiness:
    What Business Can Do
    Education + philanthropy, but philanthropic dollars rarely tied to workforce readiness initiatives.
    Business community not speaking in clear, unified voice about what is needed for educational investment
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Improving Workforce Readiness:
    What Business Can Do
    Be clear about what workforce readiness requires
    Track cost and quality of various training programs
    Offer direct training or funding with corp. philanthropic monies
    K-12
    technical schools
    colleges
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Improving Workforce Readiness:
    What Business Can Do
    Coordinate initiatives between HR, community relations, and corp. philanthropy depts.
    Make full use of publicly funded sources
    Leverage community relations and training investments
    Public policy focus
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Improving Workforce Readiness:
    What Business Can Do
    Make the business case for workforce readiness programs by going beyond improving specific skills.
    Illustrate the impact on bottom-line results.
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • Questions?
    The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce
  • The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce:
    Exploring the Challenges of Employer-Provided Workforce Readiness Training