NCCET Presentation - Design Makes A Difference - by Lindle Grigsby

  • 518 views
Uploaded on

NCCET Presentation - Design Makes A Difference - by Lindle Grigsby

NCCET Presentation - Design Makes A Difference - by Lindle Grigsby

More in: Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
518
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Today, there is much discussion and debate about how learning “happens”, and best takes place. New discoveries in cognitive behavior and the effects that physical environment has on enhancing (or inhibiting) learning, have led to general agreement that these goals will characterize “classrooms” of the future.
  • Today, there is much discussion and debate about how learning “happens”, and best takes place. New discoveries in cognitive behavior and the effects that physical environment has on enhancing (or inhibiting) learning, have led to general agreement that these goals will characterize “classrooms” of the future.

Transcript

  • 1. Design Makes A Difference It Creates Opportunities for Learning
  • 2. What’s the difference between these classrooms?
  • 3. 1901 Today Not much. And that’s the problem.
  • 4. Who Are Out CE/Workforce Students?
    • From most affluent era of American
    • history
    • From most educated era of American history
    • Demanding more of everything
  • 5. How Are We Addressing Our CE/Workforce Students’ Demands?
    • We have defined what we want them to learn
    • We have created the measurements to judge the level at which they learned it
  • 6. “ We’re born to learn.” – Rita Smilkstein “ Human beings are designed to be learning machines.” – Buckminster Fuller
  • 7. PROCESSOR SENSORY INPUT The Human Body…A Complex System of Interdependencies…The Learning Process
  • 8. You Need Space For Learning – At Any Age
    • Early Learning
    • Pedagogy
      • Two Greek Words
      • Pedia = Child
      • Agogue = To Lead
    • Teacher led and guided
    • “ Sage on the Stage”
    • Adult Learning
    • Andragogy
      • Two Greek Words
      • Andra = Adult
      • Agogue = To Lead
    • Student –instructor cooperative learning
    • “ Guide by the Side”
  • 9. Interface (WebCT) Cognitive Presence Interaction with Content Social Presence Interaction with Peers Teaching Presence Interaction with Instructor LEARNING
  • 10. Six phases of the human natural learning process Source: Rita Smilkstein We innately know the process of learning
    • Motivation
    • Beginning practice
    • Advanced practice
    • Skillfulness
    • Refinement
    • Mastery
  • 11.
    • OLD
    • Provide instruction – teacher controlled
    • Support the lecture
    • Specified time required, learning varies
    • Improve the quality of instruction
    • Achieve information access
    • Transfer knowledge, offer courses
    • Prescribed, time tested approach
    • Static
    • Linear
    • Ownership of campus space
    • Classroom
    NEW Produce learning – student centered Support diverse ever improving strategies Specified learning outcomes Improve the quality of learning Achieve success as well as access Students discover and construct knowledge Choices, experimentation, assessment, evolution Dynamic Interacting frameworks Diversity of learning environments- Learning Studios Motivation: Paradigm Shift Instruction Learning
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16. Process: Choose Solutions Floor Plan – L1
  • 17. Process: Choose Solutions Floor Plan – L2
  • 18. Process: Choose Solutions
  • 19. Process: Choose Solutions
  • 20. Process: Choose Solutions
  • 21.  
  • 22. Process: Choose Solutions
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26. “ Human beings are designed to be learning machines” Buckminster Fuller We are “wired” to learn through dynamic, engaged activities that require that we control all aspects of a stimulating and supportive learning environment. The characteristics and quality of human made spaces affects the success of learning experiences and outcomes.
  • 27. Learning can, does and should occur across the entire campus environment, 24/7. A learning environment is a place where personal motivation is stimulated, curiosity is aroused and challenged, and the desire for socialization is satisfied. EFC created formal and informal learning environments that are evolutionary, stimulating, collaborative, sustainable, “sticky” and appropriate.
  • 28. The decision making process was repeatedly altered by asking the question…”How does this decision increase learning outcomes?” How much “learning per square foot” will be generated by a dynamic program and alternate, exploratory design concepts? We have learned from the past and we want the present to explore and define the future of educational architecture.
  • 29. Always ask the question: “ How does this decision improve learning outcomes?” The right space does not guarantee educational success but the wrong space will make success unlikely
  • 30. Design Makes A Difference HKS Architectural Firm Dan Arrowood Terry Hajduk Steelcase Inc. Ed Roy Robert Rea BKM of Texas Carol Roehrig Carlene Wilson Herman –Miller Lori Gee Beth Anderson Design Learning Spaces Homero Lopez Linda Garcia It Creates Opportunities for Learning