The Power of Networks

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The Power of Networks

  1. 1. The Power of Networks<br />Noah Flower<br />April 20th, 2010<br />Available online: workingwikily.net/sfbaeap.pptx<br />
  2. 2. Monitor Institute: who we are<br />part consulting firm, drawing on the talents of our own dedicated team and the resources of the global professional services firm, Monitor Group. <br />part incubatorof new approaches. We work with clients and partners to test and prove new models for social impact.<br />part think tank, analyzing and anticipating important shifts in the rapidly changing context that leaders must navigate. <br />
  3. 3. Working Wikily: our blog and whitepapers<br />
  4. 4. Tonight’s agenda<br />Conversation with Tamara Alvarado, Anasa Troutman, and Roger Kim<br />The potential for “working wikily”<br />Mapping your networks<br />What makes a network healthy<br />How to lead in a network<br />Closing discussion with SFBAEAP<br />What personal networks do you find most valuable, and how do they connect you to the arts versus other sectors? <br />How have you pursued your organization's goals through building relationships with organizations,  the public, or other stakeholders? <br />
  5. 5. Tonight’s agenda<br />Conversation with Tamara Alvarado, Anasa Troutman, and Roger Kim<br />The potential for “working wikily”<br />Mapping your networks<br />What makes a network healthy<br />How to lead in a network<br />Closing discussion with SFBAEAP<br />
  6. 6. What are “networks”?<br />Just what you’d think: <br />Any meaningful set of relationships among people. <br />
  7. 7. So what’s new?<br />You can do more as a person. <br />You can do more as a group. <br />And groups can be different.<br />
  8. 8. What can different look like?<br />It’s a spectrum…<br />Working hierarchically<br />Working wikily<br />Centralized<br />Firmly controlled<br />Planned<br />Proprietary<br />Transactional<br />Downward communication<br />Decentralized<br />Loosely controlled<br />Emergent<br />Open, shared<br />Relational<br />Two-way conversation<br />
  9. 9. Why is this important for nonprofits?<br />There are more nonprofits every day.<br />Few operate on a large scale.<br />There are fewer dollars to go around.<br />“82% of nonprofits operate on less than $1M in budget.”<br /><ul><li>Center for Nonprofits ‘07</li></li></ul><li>Networks are one answer for increasing scale, efficiency, coordination, and impact.<br />Isolation? <br />Unmet needs?<br />Lack of power?<br />Duplication and fragmentation?<br />Lack of shared knowledge?<br />Untapped talent and wisdom?<br />Suboptimal impact and growth?<br />Build community<br />Engage people<br />Advocate for policy change<br />Coordinate resources and services<br />Develop and share knowledge<br />Innovate <br />Get to scale<br />
  10. 10. Tonight’s agenda<br />Conversation with Tamara Alvarado, Anasa Troutman, and Roger Kim<br />The potential for “working wikily”<br />Mapping your networks<br />What makes a network healthy<br />How to lead in a network<br />Closing discussion with SFBAEAP<br />
  11. 11. MAPPING YOUR NETWORKSA few definitions from the handout<br />Periphery<br />Cluster<br />Link<br />Node<br />Core<br />Hub<br />
  12. 12. MAPPING YOUR NETWORKSExample: The Green and Healthy Building Network<br />In 2005:<br />Source: Barr Foundation “Green and Healthy Building Network Case Study” by Beth Tener, Al Neirenberg, Bruce Hoppe<br />
  13. 13. MAPPING YOUR NETWORKSExample: The Green and Healthy Building Network<br />In 2007:<br />Source: Barr Foundation “Green and Healthy Building Network Case Study” by Beth Tener, Al Neirenberg, Bruce Hoppe<br />
  14. 14. MAPPING YOUR NETWORKSWhat network mapping can do<br /><ul><li>Show participants how they’re connected
  15. 15. Show where resources are located and how they flow
  16. 16. Assess how the connections could be improved
  17. 17. Document change in the connections over time
  18. 18. Spark strategic conversation among participants</li></li></ul><li>MAPPING YOUR NETWORKSThe industrial-strength version<br />Validate &DiscussResults<br />Identify<br />Next<br />Steps<br />CollectData<br />Analyze<br />Data<br />Frame the Problem<br /><ul><li>Goal
  19. 19. Problem/ Opportunity
  20. 20. Hypotheses
  21. 21. Who/Boundaries
  22. 22. Relationships/Flows
  23. 23. Demographics
  24. 24. Surveys
  25. 25. Interviews
  26. 26. Focus groups
  27. 27. Data mining
  28. 28. Specialized network mapping software helps to understand data:
  29. 29. Visually (Maps)
  30. 30. Quantitatively (Metrics)
  31. 31. Preliminary review
  32. 32. One-on-one interviews
  33. 33. Interactive feedback session
  34. 34. Formal presentation
  35. 35. Planning
  36. 36. Training
  37. 37. Organizational Changes
  38. 38. Specific interventions</li></ul>Follow-up<br />Framework developed by Roberto Cremonini at the Barr Foundation<br />
  39. 39. Tonight’s agenda<br />Conversation with Tamara Alvarado, Anasa Troutman, and Roger Kim<br />The potential for “working wikily”<br />Mapping your networks<br />What makes a network healthy<br />How to lead in a network<br />Closing discussion with SFBAEAP<br />
  40. 40. Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />Helpful Sources: M. Kearns and K. Showalter; J. Holley and V. Krebs; P. Plastrik and M. Taylor; J. W. Skillern; C. Shirky<br />WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYEight general factors<br />
  41. 41. <ul><li>Clearly articulated give and get for participants
  42. 42. Delivers value/ outcomes to participants</li></ul>Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYFactor 1: Value<br />
  43. 43. WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYFactor 2: Participation<br /><ul><li>Trust: strong relationships
  44. 44. Diversity: bridging and valuing differences
  45. 45. High level of voluntary engagement</li></ul>Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />
  46. 46. WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYFactor 3: Form<br /><ul><li>Balance of top-down and bottom-up logic
  47. 47. Space for self-organized action</li></ul>Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />
  48. 48. WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYFactor 4: Leadership<br /><ul><li>Embraces openness, transparency, decentralization
  49. 49. Shared responsibility and authority</li></ul>Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />
  50. 50. WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYFactor 5: Governance<br />Arbitration Committee<br />16 as of 3/21/09<br />Stewards<br />37 as of 3/3/09<br />Bureaucrats<br />29 active as of 12/22/08<br />Administrators 1,648 as of 4/29/09<br />Registered Users<br />9,540,944 as of 4/29/09<br /><ul><li>Representative of the network’s diversity
  51. 51. Transparent</li></ul>Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />
  52. 52. WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYFactor 6: Connection<br /><ul><li>Strategic use of social media</li></ul>Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />
  53. 53. WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYFactor 7: Capacity<br /><ul><li>Ample shared space, online and in-person
  54. 54. Ability surface & tap network talent
  55. 55. Model for sustainability</li></ul>Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />
  56. 56. WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYFactor 8: Learning & Adaptation<br /><ul><li>Mechanisms for learning-capture / storytelling
  57. 57. Ability to gather and act on feedback</li></ul>Value<br />Participation<br />Form<br />Leadership<br />Governance<br />Connection<br />Capacity<br />Learning & Adaptation<br />
  58. 58. WHAT MAKES A NETWORK HEALTHYHow healthy is your network?<br />Use our diagnostic to do your own evaluation:<br />http://www.workingwikily.net/network_diagnostic.pdf<br />
  59. 59. Tonight’s agenda<br />Conversation with Tamara Alvarado, Anasa Troutman, and Roger Kim<br />The potential for “working wikily”<br />Mapping your networks<br />What makes a network healthy<br />How to lead in a network<br />Closing discussion with SFBAEAP<br />
  60. 60. HOW TO LEAD IN A NETWORKDifferent mindset, strategy, and actions<br />Organizational Leadership<br />Network Leadership<br />Mindset<br />Competition<br />Collaboration<br />Strategy<br />Grow the organization<br />Grow the network<br />Actions<br />Compete for resources<br />Protect knowledge<br />Competitive advantage<br />Hoard talent<br />Share resources<br />Open source IP<br />Develop competitors<br />Cultivate leadership<br />Source: Heather McLeod Grant and Leslie R. Crutchfield,Forces for Good(2007).<br />
  61. 61. HOW TO LEAD IN A NETWORKDifferent attitudes & attributes<br />Organizational Leadership<br />Network Leadership<br />Attitudes & attributes<br />Authority-conscious<br />Individualistic<br />Controlling<br />Directive<br />Transactional<br />Top-down<br />Action-oriented<br />Alignment-conscious<br />Collective<br />Facilitative<br />Patient<br />Relational<br />Bottom-up<br />Process-oriented<br />
  62. 62. HOW TO LEAD IN A NETWORKThe work of a network leader<br /><ul><li>Convene diverse people and groups
  63. 63. Engage network participants
  64. 64. Generate collective action
  65. 65. Broker connections and bridge difference
  66. 66. Build social capital – emphasize trust
  67. 67. Nurture self-organization
  68. 68. Genuinely participate
  69. 69. Leverage technology
  70. 70. Create, and protect network ‘space’</li></ul>Source: Adapted from Net Work by Patti Anklam (2007) and “Vertigo and the Intentional Inhabitant: Leadership in a Connected World” by Bill Traynor (2009)<br />
  71. 71. HOW TO LEAD IN A NETWORKParticular roles to play<br />Establishes value proposition(s)<br />Establishes first links to participants<br />Organizer<br />Funder<br />Provides initial resources for organizing the network<br />Works to increase connections among participants<br />May focus on growing the network by connecting to new participants<br />Can be multiple people with formal and informal roles<br />Weaver<br />Facilitator / Coordinator<br />Helps participants to undertake collective action<br />Ensures flow of information and other resources<br />Technology Steward<br />Facilitates the network use of online technology to learn, coordinate, connect or share information together<br />Sources: Peter Plastrik and Madeleine Taylor, Net Gains (2006); Beth Kanter; Stephanie Lowell , Building the Field of Dreams (2007); White, Wenger, and Smith, Digital Habitats (2009)<br />
  72. 72. HOW TO LEAD IN A NETWORKCommon challenges<br />Unlearning the organizational mindset<br />Engaging and inspiring participants without being controlling<br />Letting go of control<br />Determining network boundaries<br />Dealing with information overload <br />Making the case & measuring success<br />Learning and leveraging new technologies <br />
  73. 73. ?<br />HOW TO LEAD IN A NETWORKQuestions to ask yourself<br /><ul><li>What is your network leadership work? What roles do you play?
  74. 74. What are the skills and characteristics that will help you succeed?
  75. 75. Which are your strengths? Which do you need to work on?
  76. 76. What are 3 steps you can take to strengthen your network leadership?</li></li></ul><li>Tonight’s agenda<br />Conversation with Tamara Alvarado, Anasa Troutman, and Roger Kim<br />The potential for “working wikily”<br />Mapping your networks<br />What makes a network healthy<br />How to lead in a network<br />Closing discussion with SFBAEAP<br />
  77. 77. Thank you.<br />Noah Flower<br />Monitor Institute<br />415.932.5345<br />Blog: workingwikily.net<br />Slides: workingwikily.net/SFBAEAP.pptx<br />Twitter: @workingwikily<br />
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