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Online Learning Innovations:  Rethinking Classroom Practices
 

Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices

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This is a copy of the power point presentation by Cheryl Bray for TESOL Arabia, 2011 on Saturday March 12th. This is uploaded for the benefit of those who attended the presentation. ...

This is a copy of the power point presentation by Cheryl Bray for TESOL Arabia, 2011 on Saturday March 12th. This is uploaded for the benefit of those who attended the presentation.
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  • In a well balanced foreign or second language course, there are roughly equal opportunities for learning through the four strands of 1 meaning focused input - learning through listening and reading 2 meaning focused output - learning through speaking and writing 3 language focused learning - learning through deliberate attention to language features 4 fluency development - learning through working with known material across the four skills at a higher than usual level of performance. Nation, Paul. (2003). The role of first language in foreign language learning. Asian EFL Journal.
  • It wouldn’t be integrated technology unless I involved you in the process, so let’s start here: http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/MTYyMzE2NTAzMg http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTQ5MjgwMzQ1MQ http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTE0Mjk0MTMyMg
  • Why e-learning learning? Fractal” visual example of iterative design: repetition slowly striving for perfection Warschauer sees the computer and internet as tools for social development and change. It opens the possibilities for process of autonomous and collaborative learning , developing and practicing language strategies , empowering students both in a communicative classroom and and beyond the classroom in the world and virtual world. (discussion in Markee, 1997a in Warchschauer, 2002). Add note from computer book re effectiveness of online learning and how call has changed. There is an attention to product, developing competencies in language, including variety of genres such as blogs, wikis, email, twitter, computer applications, fluency in keyboard skills, and computer technology, searching on the World Wide Web, a research tool and information exchange. Warschauer notes that in his research students see technology as an essential value added tool, English is no longer only the end goal, but a critical tool for learning fluency in contemporary information technology. Universities with their extensive use of computers enforces student’s needs for expertise in information and communication technologies. It is an empowering tool in the global society but needs autonomous lifelong learners. Students are learning skills and strategies for becoming autonomous lifelong learners,more than being self directed this includes both how to explore and evaluate information. Google: iteration: images How is it helpful? It motivates students, they want to belong to this new age, its exciting, its multisensory motivate students? Yes, they want to be part of that group Keller’ Model of Motivation: arouse interest. be relevant, opportunities to succeed and build confidence, engage long term learning (Keller in bray & DurhaM, English in learning: Learning in English. TESOL Arabia, 2010, 232) create synergy in the classroom? Because they can use it for projects, it provides a freedom for creativity manageable for the teacher? Yes, especially through projects: CBI: content based learning part of best practices? Is this part of best practice: Yes What is the point as teachers for us to spend the time involving students in e-learning? To answer these questions lets look at some of the literature Most students want to be a part of the contemporary computer age, if the class is seen as innovative and involving contemporary information and technology they are more likely to be motivated. Symbolic and prestige dimension (Kern, TESOL) Dornyei incorporated much of the research of Deci and notes that motivation is both prominent and formidable in our lives Sapir and Whorf in Bray in Wardaugh note the interconnected relationship between language and our position in the world, 2010, p. 230.
  • Visual elements, sounds - reinforce learning and for introducing topics, reinforces pronounciation, introduces new vocabulary, visuals scaffold learning, kinesthetic gained through typing, writing, moving eyes to follow, speaking - hear and watch people, body language, VARK The word "VARK" was launched in 1987 through work done at Lincoln University by Neil Fleming. The seminal publication appeared in 1992 in the following publication and should be cited as such: Fleming, N.D. and Mills, C. (1992), Not Another Inventory, Rather a Catalyst for Reflection, To Improve the Academy, Vol. 11, 1992., page 137. Neil Flemming in TG Anderson Beatty’s book on computer assisted language learning noted that to gain knowledge we need to internalize information, create a network of ideas and information. We do this by presenting the information to students in multiple ways so we reinforce learning but also reach different types of learners with a variety of language learning stragies. Technology is a means to do this. Anderson, T.G. in Beatty, Ken. Teaching and Researching Computer-assisted Language learning. Edinburgh Gate: Pearson Education, 2003.
  • People are motivated to be part of the contemporary computer age, for all ages, formal and informal English,huge variety of topics Student motivation and attitude Motivation relates to the learning situation interest in integrating with the target group Our position in the world (Gardner in Bray & Durham, English in learning: Learning in English. TESOL Arabia, 2010, 224) Sapir & Whorf in Bray & DurhaM, English in learning: Learning in English. TESOL Arabia, 2010, 230) Keller’s Model of Motivation: Computer assisted learning fits all of these parameters. Student interests are aroused by the variety of learning mediums, multisensory, appealing to different learning styles. It is relevant because it incorporates contemporary technology and contemporary topics, can modify subjects to be personally relevant to students Opportunities to succeed and build confidence: reiterative nature, building on vocabulary, comprehension, can retake quizzes to improve scores, can modify to reflect students needs and development Most importantly it engages them in long term learning because they aren’t only learning English, they are learning how to succeed on their own, how to do research, how to work with others, how to be a part of the network of global communication Convergence across digital devices, CALL not only computers, but phones, PDAs etc. Chapelle raises questions about what is the language now, discourse, how good is it? Zhao in reviewing the research and conducting metanalysis notes that it is important to consider the goal in the language learning and consider the implications Changing World Dramatically different, Rapidly evolving, communicative technologies : Phones, email, WWW, messaging, social networks, images, videos, blogs, wikis, wireless networks Kern, R. Perspectives on technology in learning and teaching languages Tesol quarterly Vol. 4, no. 1, March 2006 CALL now integral to language use Warschaur, Ibid. Way Technology is used is critical Zhao, Ibid.,189 Social, cognitive, cultural, educational implications Zhao, Ibid.,189
  • Metaphors for the computer: Kern building on the work of Levy (1997) sees computers as operating as a tutor, a tool and a medium This allows the user to direct their own learning: learner recieves feedback, works independently, learner centered, consciousness is raised, noticing is a big part of learning what to change, Roles of the Computer Tutor: Creates Awareness, noticing Improves reading, listening comprehension and pronunciation This would include quizzes and tests that the teacher develops, online quizzes, gap exercises, so we will be examining these in more detail. Hubbard and Siskin , in. Perspectives on technology in learning and teaching languages Tesol quarterly Vol. 4, no. 1, March 2006, 192 Roles of the Computer Medium Computer Mediated Communication Social and cultural context reinforces teacher’s approach Students took their new skills seriously negotiate new roles and identities Warschauer in kern in. Perspectives on technology in learning and teaching languages Tesol quarterly Vol. 4, no. 1, March 2006, 196,197 Roles of the Computer Medium: Computer Mediated Communication Creates Synergy Intercultural ~ knowledge Research and Critical Thinking Warschauer in kern in. Perspectives on technology in learning and teaching languages Tesol quarterly Vol. 4, no. 1, March 2006, 196,197 So examples of this would be email, msn, wiki, where students are writing and reading and negotiating meaning Can also include digital story telling, or multimodal texts, Students can appropriate new language that helps them to change their identities and social context Instead of teaching English using computers, we are teaching computers using English. Examine corpus, concordances students formulate and test hypothesis, Teachers may use these tools in preparing curriculum, materials or advanced students may use them A text may be analyzed for the Academic word list and words drawn out based on that, can be done by students or teacher AWL: Avril Coxhead, Victoria University of Wellington New Zealand Roles of the Computer Tool: Real world context learner centred Form focused: Genre, register, Rutherford in kern in. Perspectives on technology in learning and teaching languages Tesol quarterly Vol. 4, no. 1, March 2006, 192
  • http://www.inspirationalspark.com/failure-quotes.html In the same way that Kolb describes how learners go from concrete, to reflective observation, to abstract conceptualization, to experimentation, we can apply a variety of techniques using computers to support each stage of the learning cyle. We as teachers are experimenting in the same way that students are with language, small changes slowly leading towards perfection, though we may not ever get there. Kolb's model therefore works on two levels - a four-stage cycle: 1. Concrete Experience - (CE) 2. Reflective Observation - (RO) 3. Abstract Conceptualization - (AC) 4. Active Experimentation - (AE) and a four-type definition of learning styles, (each representing the combination of two preferred styles, rather like a two-by-two matrix of the four-stage cycle styles, as illustrated below), for which Kolb used the terms: 1. Diverging (CE/RO) 2. Assimilating (AC/RO) 3. Converging (AC/AE) 4. Accommodating (CE/AE) "Success is the ability to go from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm." ~ Sir Winston Churchill Thomas Edison: When I have eliminated the ways that won’t work I will have found the ways that do work. Michael Jordan says he has failed over and over again and that is why he has succeeded. So each small change leads us not into failure, but to a greater chance of success.
  • So we have discussed why use computers, the concept of how they add a dynamic aspect to teaching and learning so now lets go back to the types of applications I said I would discuss. In the survey the majority of you said that you were interested in………..so we will cover all the points but I will try to spend extra time focusing on that aspect. Vygotsky: Content based learning JS Bruner on the constructivist approach: students need to participate in the process that leads them to establish knowledge. (Beatty, K. Teaching and researching Computer-assisted language learning. Bruner, p.94.) My goal today is to introduce you to some ideas for using technology in the classroom, to help you find something that will increase student participation and lead to great knowledge. I will be covering a lot of information, but my goal is that you might find one or two tools that you decide to try out, to see if you can find a fit that works for you, with your own learning and teaching style.
  • So let’s start at the most basic level, using the internet for lesson support, to scaffold readings, grammar, listening, to engage students in the topic you are teaching. YouTube is a great way to excite student’s schema, pique their curiousity, build a sense of anticipation can be used for listening tasks, discussion, bridge in for a lesson, etc. Can you guess what topic here? Students can explore a multitude of related links and prepare an analysis comparing them. Or, if you want a listening, then how about a news video or podcast? The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation produces a myriad of free videos on current events, entertainment, sports to access directly and podcasts that can be downloaded through iTunes. http://www.cbc.ca/ BBC produces a wide range of supports for ESL, including the 6 minute podcast. http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/how2/ Wiki media is another great page from Wikipedia with links to a huge range of multimedia content that is again free of charge. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media So here we are just on the first point of Online learning Tools/Mediums for communication, for Internet sites for lesson support, activating student’s schema, providing multisensory lessons, motivating student research, providing practice in ESL skills, content based research and lessons…..Let’s move on, you have the idea. http://www.cbc.ca/sports/soccer/ http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/podcasts/how2/
  • Online dictionaries, Cambridge Advanced includes a sound clip with UK and US accents freeing the students to work independently Kathy Schrock’s site has lesson plans, rubrics and links to help teachers teach critical thinking when using internet sites, and make exercises for use online or off, like word puzzles. Vocabulary Exercises uses the AWL developed by Avril Coxhead with the word lists, and related exercises. http://www.academicvocabularyexercises.com/id22.htm Lisa’s (Online) Teaching Blog has lots of resource links and interesting articles Dave’s ESL Café is very popular and has lots of links Through the TESL Canada Federation site I found an amazing site with all sorts of links This has every resource imaginable for ESL teachers. http://www.dictionary.cambridge.org/ http://lisahistory.net/wordpress/ http://www.eslcafe.com/ This is barely scratching the surface because there are………. (google research)
  • Here is the second way of rethinking classroom classes and integrating technology, to use existing online exercises. Self Study Quizzes for Students. A4esl.org: A wide range of skills and activities. Like: ie. Grammar about places; good to integrate with cultural learning. Many Things.org: wide range of activities, including read along, focus on listening, http://www.manythings.org/ Copyright ゥ 1997-2010 by Charles Kelly and Lawrence Kelly, Iteslj.org Copyright (C) 1995-2004 by The Internet TESL Journal Between the Lions is a great site for children, with readings that highlight the words as they are read out loud. http://pbskids.org/lions/stories/ PBS
  • 1,380,000 results So let’s just hit some highlights that I have found useful. Learn English Feel Good has some great ideas including using short video clips for listening comprehension. Or Grammar exercises which give the students a score at the end LearnEnglish Feel Good cities around the world Two of the big advantage for self-scoring quizzes are that the students are motivated to finish and get their score, and that they also have an opportunity to retake the quiz and improve their score. This is also an advantage of the teacher who can record the mark giving more weight and value to the exercise. I find that students usually do well on these quizzes so it gives them a positive sense of accomplishment.
  • 1,380,000 results So let’s just hit some highlights that I have found useful. Learn English Feel Good has some great ideas including using short video clips for listening comprehension. Or Grammar exercises which give the students a score at the end LearnEnglish Feel Good cities around the world Two of the big advantage for self-scoring quizzes are that the students are motivated to finish and get their score, and that they also have an opportunity to retake the quiz and improve their score. This is also an advantage of the teacher who can record the mark giving more weight and value to the exercise. I find that students usually do well on these quizzes so it gives them a positive sense of accomplishment.
  • So, let’s take it up a notch. Here is the third way to be innovative in the classroom, by creating your own online exercises. I am going to talk about 2 programs briefly, Studymate and HotPotatoes. First, I like studymate because I can enter data, ie questions, answers, one time, but create a variety of up to 12 tools like flashcards, matching, a focus on spelling and games. This is really efficient and the tools vary from flash cards, to matching tools, to testing. There is positive washback from immediate feedback and it has a user friendly interface, so I like the way it looks, It makes me feel happy when I see the big green check mark on the matching question. There is a brief and boring video on the link here. Now, when I was preparing for this preparation I was searching for studymate stuff and guess what I found? Think about technology and our phones? Any ideas??? OK, an iPhone app for Studymate. http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/studymate-lms-edition/id365544608?mt=8 So here you are, if your school or college already has StudyMate it is a good learning, practice or study tool and you get the cool factor by having students use their iPhones.
  • The second program that I would like to discuss is Hot Potatoes. Its free and you can be really creative and its great for student feedback and positive backwash. Of course I googled to see if I could find an iPhone app for this and this just goes to show you where you can get badly derailed on the internet. It turns out that Hot Potatoes is also a social network site. I don’t know what the students at the University of Victoria were doing, but I don’t think it was that, so don’t go to the wrong place. I am still talking about learning English, not telling you what I am having for coffee later this morning, so use the internet link posted here. Hotpotatoes: Great for a variety of lessons: http://hotpot.uvic.ca/ From a project through the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. Website to share lessons, Hotpotatoes .net is a related site to modify scripts and run HP programs http://www.hotpotatoes.info/ This is one of the easiest programs, its free, and it offers teachers a wide diversity of online or printed exercises that they generate themselves. They also have a program called Quandry, and there are other websites with Hot Potatoes exercises, so you can share materials. If you go to the social network site, well, that is way beyond the scope of my presentation this morning.
  • Hotpotatoes: Great for a variety of lessons: http://hotpot.uvic.ca/ From a project through the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. This exercise was created to build students schema and vocabulary prior to watching a video about climate change. It incorporates several key features: 1. Visual image from beginning of film 2. Timer so students focus, creates facilitative anxiety 3. Clear instructions at the top of the page 4. Kinesthetic learning: students click and grab boxes on the right to match the vocabulary on the left. Usually once students have done this they remember, so there is a spatial relationship to the answers. I usually have them do it repeatedly till they all have 100% and then I review the answers using the projector on the classroom board.
  • This vocabulary exercise then transformed into a listening exercise with students having to input words as they listened to the movie clip. They had already watched it, knew some of the vocabulary, had adapted to the speakers tone and pronounciation, but now they had to attend to specific words and follow what was being said. I was able to stop the video as we progressed so students had an opportunity to write in words, and again we did it as an iterative process, repeating it so the students were able to achieve success with repeated attempts. Just as another example of how this exercise could have been set up, the words could have been available in drop down boxes. (show) Another variation would be to use the transcript, so students could complete it as a reading exercise. (show) Here I have removed the drop down menu so that students have to read the text and type in the exact words, no spelling or capitalization errors. You could still play the video clip so students could listen to the video while they are reading and then type in the words afterwards. There are lots of variations and ways to use the same basic transcript, we haven’t even touched on grammar!
  • The third program I have worked with, though only briefly is Quizlet. This program makes flashcards, a variety of exercises. You can explore this yourself
  • So, we are still on the third point, creating online exercises or tools, but we are moving towards more collaborative learning. Prezi is another way to be innovative in the classroom and work towards student self motivation, or just brighten up those dreadful Thursday afternoons. Prezi is easy to make and use with a little practice, its free and the students enjoy the dynamic aspect of the presentation. For a teacher, zooming in or out is easy and lends itself to creating a game of Jeopardy that students enjoy playing. Perfect for Thursday afternoons http://prezi.com/mujjqcbfnmui/grammar-jeopardy/ This quick read symbol will take you to a link that you can use to see my Jeopardy game in Prezi. You are welcome to go there and see this or any other of my Prezi presentation or tools. So for example, Reading Jeopardy that you see here is another tool I used. !
  • So what you are doing is recycling the materials you have already created and using it for creating games or review materials that students can go to independently. You just send them the link and they can access the site. Prezi is a tool that you can use to make presentations, not for interactive quizzes, but this year I used to for creating in class games, contexts like Jeopardy and for review of material covered previously. Aren’t creating more materials, but are recycling what you have already created. Post pdfs or jpgs, no links. Reading exercises were based on Reading Explorer 2 by Heinle. This was useful towards midterms or to review a chapter. Students had already used the interactive materials I created, we had looked at the videos and done the readings, but we could now Have some contests at the end of classes or on a Thursday, review one chapter at a time, or for those students who are more intensely motivated, they can review from home online. The collaborative aspect comes when you use it to play jeopardy. Divide students into two groups, then have them pick a question, and they have to agree on the answer as a group. They are recycling what they have learned, discussing the right answer, using higher order skills to explain why it’s the best answer to the rest of the group….and you haven’t done much more work but you have a happy, engaged class.
  • OK, so now let’s move on to the 4th aspect of online learning innovations, collaborative learning tools. Blogging is a form of social networking. Share with the world, or a small group, write individual or as a group, post comments. Multisensory, upload videos, photos, integrate links,
  • Blogging is a form of social networking. Share with the world, or a small group, write individual or as a group, post comments. Multisensory, upload videos, photos, integrate links,
  • Blogging is a form of social networking. Share with the world, or a small group, write individual or as a group, post comments. Multisensory, upload videos, photos, integrate links,
  • Students can create some of their project work in one document and import it to their blog, ie. Timeline of Ibn Battuta as part of their Famous Person study. Likes/Dislikes: Write about some music you like, why, post a link. Past tense: Cinema: what you did on the weekend, - practice grammar, vocabulary, sentence structure online, then do process writing for short essay describing, then do peer review, finally correct and post, import a picture last. Teaching computer technology integrated with English language instruction. Prabhu and Vygotsky constructivist approach. Could do a travel blog relating to places, describing food, ….
  • In a truly collaborative learning environment you have Wikis. Everyone has heard about Wiki leaks, but this is creating wikis for students to post and share information online. The editable web pages are designed with group projects in mind, whether its in the classroom or across the planet. So for example I used it for students to create a newspaper. Wiki has pages and Files that you organize. Wikipedia comes from the word ‘wiki’ relating to editable web sites, and the Hawaiian word wiki meaning ‘quick’ and ‘pedia’ from encyclopedia, which reflects the 3,321,000 English articles and 608,000 Spanish articles.
  • Peanut butter wiki is specifically designed for teachers, oh, and its free which is a big bonus. One wiki for everyone’s projects. Everyone can enter and edit the pages. Can give limited access, different privileges Class folder, shows groups, gives assignment, students do all their work in groups with specific roles assigned Students sign in and wiki shows date work is uploaded and who was logged in to upload it. For the teacher it relates back to student accountability. It tracks revisions so you can mark progress, see project progress, make comments for revisions, revert back to previous if needed.
  • Focus on project, ie. Newspaper, Students work because it is posted and they know you are following. You see what they are doing online and can have deadlines for postings. Encourages independence, team work, accountability, Teaching computer skills at the same time as English, uploading files, posting pictures, videos, adding links, Involves lower order and higher order thinking and tasks. Process writing can take place on the wiki, no need for additional drafts in word program. Teacher can post comments based on assignment requirements. Gives students the best opportunity for success and operates like a portfolio.
  • Here is our final point, going further with a different type of student involvement, the survey or questionnaire. There are three that I have used, but I find that google docs and Poll everywhere are the best survey tools so I am going to focus on them. Just briefly touch on surveys as a collaborative tool. This survey tool was created using google docs. You create questions in their website, then pick a survey format, and send students a link. Results are shown on the spreadsheet as students respond. Can be a teacher’s tool to invite feedback, stimulate discussion. Students can use it as part of a project they are doing. These are three, free online tools. This survey jpeg that you see here was created using google docs. I wanted to get some student input on how students in my classes felt about online learning tools. http://www.surveymonkey.com/TakeATour.aspx
  • Just briefly touch on surveys as a collaborative tool. This is about engaging students, trying to move to higher order thinking skills in Blooms taxonomy. Can be a teacher’s tool to invite feedback, stimulate discussion. We are taking a constructivist approach, as discussed by J.S. Bruner, to engage with the knowledge. Students can use it as part of a project they are doing. Here in this example students were watching the environmental film called the Age of Stupid that came out last year. I developed a series of questions I wanted them to work on in groups and answer online, and then discuss the results and their answers. Once the survey is created in google tools it is emailed with the link. These are three, free online tools. This google docs questionnaire, showing the form as I created it, was used to test comprehension and listening after students watched and answered vocabulary questions relating to the video. They had already worked with the video for lower order tasks, so the survey was used to bring in some higher order analytical thinking. Students are then able to see their results which can lead to further discussion. The teacher can decide if students do these individually, or in their groups. This is how the survey appears online, so it looks authentic, attractive, professional The red * required means that all questions are required, but depending on the nature of the survey that is up to the developer. Google Docs is one way to create a survey and it offers a sophisticated excel spreadsheet for detailed analysis. Other free survey tools are Survey Monkey and Survey Café but they have more limitations.
  • Google docs gives you a summary of the results that looks like this. I thought it would be helpful since this is the end of the presentation to wrap up by looking at how my students responded when asked questions Relating to their internet learning. 44% Strongly agree that they like to use their computers for learning English. An additional 33% Agree, 4/5 on a five point scale. On the next question 56% agree that online exercises are a good way to practice English. 50% Strongly agree that it is easy to practice and learning English online. Finally 44% Strongly Agree and 33% Agree that working online is more interesting than using a worksheet. Interestingly enough 6% strongly disagree. There were other more detailed questions, and this is only one class but it gave me some feedback about what we were doing in class. All these online tools that I have discussed were used in the classroom with a teacher giving direction and support. So these results are useful for me as a teacher to help to understand the students and their learning styles.
  • Google docs gives you a summary of the results that looks like this. I thought it would be helpful since this is the end of the presentation to wrap up by looking at how my students responded when asked questions Relating to their internet learning. 44% Strongly agree that they like to use their computers for learning English. An additional 33% Agree, 4/5 on a five point scale. On the next question 56% agree that online exercises are a good way to practice English. 50% Strongly agree that it is easy to practice and learning English online. Finally 44% Strongly Agree and 33% Agree that working online is more interesting than using a worksheet. Interestingly enough 6% strongly disagree. There were other more detailed questions, and this is only one class but it gave me some feedback about what we were doing in class. All these online tools that I have discussed were used in the classroom with a teacher giving direction and support. So these results are useful for me as a teacher to help to understand the students and their learning styles.
  • Poll Everywhere: http://www.polleverywhere.com This survey created in Poll Everywhere is designed to be given to a live audience and receive immediate, live feedback. You create the questions and then they are either saved as a power point, or you just go to the site and the responses are seen as they are entered. Respondants have the choice of responding by texting on their phone, tweeting, or going to a web site and submitting their response. This example….shows what respondants saw as they typed in their responses to the website, it was instantaneous. Once responses are in they can also be viewed this way, listing the number of respondants, or responses by code, with percent. This is an exciting tool for immediate participation with respondants.
  • In summary then, we have thought about 5 aspects of being innovative in the classroom, of rethinking our classroom practices. We have looked at internet sites such as you tube, news stations like CBC or BBC, web sites for lesson support, resources a teacher might use in their lessons, or students might use for research. Then we looked at existing online exercises or sites that help students learn and practice more specific skills such as vocabulary, grammar, spelling. Then we looked at the program Hot potatoes as one example of creating your own online exercises, using quizzes, or gaps to learn and practice all the skills. After that we examined the idea of collaborative learning using blogs and wikis, in particular peanut butter wiki. And finally we looked at surveys and questionnaires as tools for stimulating discussion, creating opportunities for higher order thinking, and actively engaging learners, as well as providing tools for analyzing results. These included Google docs, surveys and Poll Everywhere, but there are also others available.
  • On this final page I have included my bibliography with all sorts of links. I have uploaded this presentation to the new tool I am playing with, slideshare. You are welcome to access all of this information at this link: http://www.slideshare.net/upload

Online Learning Innovations:  Rethinking Classroom Practices Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Presentation Transcript

  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Cheryl Bray TESOL Arabia 2011 Rethinking Language Teaching
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices
    • Internet sites for lesson support
    • Existing online exercises/sites
    • Programs for creating online exercises
    • collaborative learning: Blogs/Wikis
    • Surveys/Questionnaires
    • By Cheryl Bray, MA TESOL for TESOL ARABIA, March, 2011.
    Exploring:
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices learning fluency In information technology Autonomous and Collaborative Empowering Students Attention to product/Genres
  • multimedia, multisensory Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices V isual, a uditory, r eading/writing, k inesthetic Why e-learning?
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Contemporary approach appeal All Learners & learning styles Wide range of resources available higher order & lower order Thinking Why e-learning ?
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices
    • Roles of the Computer
    • Tutor: Give instruction, feedback, test all skills
    • Tool: Written, audio, Visual materials, checkers, dictionaries,
    • Medium: Messaging, wikis, blogs,
    • publication and interaction
    • Kern, R. Perspectives on technology in learning and teaching languages Tesol quarterly Vol. 4, no. 1, March 2006, 191
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Iterative Small changes Striving for Perfection When I have eliminated the ways that won’t work I will have found the ways that do work . Thomas Edison
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices
    • Internet sites for lesson support
    • Existing online exercises/sites
    • Programs for creating online exercises
    • collaborative learning: Blogs/Wikis
    • Surveys/Questionnaires
    • Cheryl Bray, MA TESOL for TESOL Arabia, March 2011.
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Internet sites for lesson support
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Internet sites for lesson support
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Existing Online Exercises
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices 1,380,000 results Existing Online Exercises
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices 1,380,000 results Existing Online Exercises
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Programs to Create Online Exercises StudyMate Positive Washback Variety of practice tools from one exercise User friendly interface http://www.respondus.com/movies/Intro-StudyMateClass/Intro-StudyMateClass.html
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Programs to Create Online Exercises http://hotpot.uvic.ca/
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Programs to Create Online Exercises http://hotpot.uvic.ca/
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Programs to Create Online Exercises http://hotpot.uvic.ca/
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Programs to Create Online Exercises Quizlet.com Quizlet Premade exercises User creates exercises Online or print outs
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Review Tool: Prezi www.prezi.com Contests In Class or independent review Focus on specific aspects or overview
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Review Tool: Prezi www.prezi.com
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Collaborative Learning Blogs Dashboard Individual or group Integrate Music/Photos Links, comments
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Collaborative Learning Blogs Teacher Posts Assignment Links to Student Blogs
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Collaborative Learning Blogs Provide instructions or Model Students do Process writing then Post Blog Add Photos
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Collaborative Learning Blogs
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Collaborative Learning Wikis
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Collaborative Learning Wikis Wiki Means….. Peanut Butter Wiki Folders
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Collaborative Learning Wikis Students learn formatting Add Media or Links Genre
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices Surveys and Questionnaires Google Docs Poll Everywhere Survey Monkey
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Online Surveys Higher Order thinking
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Online Surveys Feedback
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Online Surveys Create Questions Create Survey Email link to students http://www.google.com/google-d-s/forms/
  • Rethinking Classroom Practices Online Surveys PollEverywhere .com
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices summary
    • Internet sites for lesson support
    • Existing online exercises/sites
    • Programs for creating online exercises
    • collaborative learning
    • Surveys/Questionnaires
  • Online Learning Innovations: Rethinking Classroom Practices
    • Bibliography
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