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Pr ppt group d
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Pr ppt group d

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  • Matt Woods
  • Ray The field of ethics, also called moral philosophy, involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior” Definitions of ethics normally have in common the elements of requiring some form of systematic analysis, distinguishing right from wrong, and determining the nature of what should be valued.
  • Matt Woods International Codes: Global alliance for PR and Communication Management is a group of PR organizations throughout the world and bases its ethics code on cooporation, team work, professionalism, credibility, integrity, innovation, change, openness and dialogue Societal Codes: The Ten Commandments Professional Codes: a doctor’s Hippocratic oath Organizational Codes: business organizations may enact an ethics code that every employ is asked to read, sign and follow Personal Codes: personal values such as not working on sunday, recycling ect.
  • Chris Tucci
  • Matt Woods Advocacy: acting as responsible advocates for those we represent. We provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas, facts and viewpoints to aid public debate Honesty: Adhere to the highest standards of accuracy and truth in advancing the interests of those we represent and in communicating with the public Expertise: Acquire and and responsibly use specialized knowledge and experience Independence: Provide objective council to those we represent and are accountable for our actions Loyalty: faithful to those we represent while honoring our obligations to serve public interests Fairness: Deal fairly with clients, employers, competitors, piers, vendors, media and the general public
  • Ray Corporate Watch believes By giving vested interests the opportunity to deliberately deceive, and derail public debate on key issues the public relations industry reduces society’s capacity to respond effectively to key social, environmental and political challenges.
  • Chris Tucci
  • Mushirah WHAT IS THE PUBLIC’S PERCEPTION OF PR PEOPLE?-The first response was: “are you serious?” This was followed by: “whyever would you want to do that? So you want to be in a profession whereyou deceive everyone to further yourself?”Many people ask me: “So what actually is PR?” whilst others can’tunderstand why I’m studying it at all responding with:  “Oh I could do that,easy.” I would love to put them to the test.I am starting to believe that PR’s reputation is an issue that practitionerssimply learn to accept mainly because it is very difficult to control orchange opinions.
  • Mushirah Reed Often people do not understand the connection between PRs action and their outcomes, The Florida department of heath used a character named Ben Spring and according to researchers he wouldn’t wash his hands, cough and sneeze with out covering his mouth. This edgy and humorous 2008 PR campaign was created wutg a serious purpose in mind: To convince people to take steps to halt the spread of highly contagious germs to avoid a much-feared flu pandemic. This was given world wide media coverage and most important made people more health conscious.
  • Mushirah Reed (To the warm and fuzzy spin) Although technically they’re not lying, does an action like this conflict with the honesty value in the code of ethics?
  • Ray The ability to engage in ethical reasoning in public relations is growing in demand, in responsibility, and in importance. Academic research, university and continuing education, and professional practice are all attending more than ever to matters of ethics. The public relations function stands at a critical and defining juncture: whether to become an ethics counselor to top management or to remain outside the realm of the strategic decision making core. How we choose to respond to the crisis of trust among our publics will define the public relations of the future. Although it is true that no single person or function can be the entire “ethical conscience” of an organization, the public relations function is ideally informed to counsel top management about ethical issues. Public relations professionals know the values of key publics involved with ethical dilemmas, and can conduct rigorous ethical analyses to guide the policies of their organizations, as well as in communications with publics and the news media. Careful and consistent ethical analyses facilitate trust, which enhances the building and maintenance of relationships – after all, that is the ultimate purpose of the public relations function.
  • Chris Tucci
  • Matt Woods
  • Transcript

    • 1. Ethics in Public Relations <ul><li>Introduction to Public Relations </li></ul><ul><li>Fall 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>(GDS Group D) </li></ul><ul><li>Mushirah Reed, Chris Tucci, Matthew Woods, Ruijiah Zhao </li></ul>
    • 2. Ethics <ul><li>The field of ethics, also called moral philosophy, involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior” Definitions of ethics normally have in common the elements of requiring some form of systematic analysis, distinguishing right from wrong, and determining the nature of what should be valued. </li></ul>
    • 3. Ethics Codes for Values-Driven PR <ul><li>Ethics Codes identify core values and specify ways to achieve those values </li></ul><ul><ul><li>International Codes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Societal Codes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional Codes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizational Codes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal Codes </li></ul></ul>
    • 4. Public Relations Society of America Code of Ethics <ul><li>Core Principle: Protecting and advancing the free flow of accurate and truthful information is essential to serving public interests and contributing to informed decision making in a democratic society. </li></ul>
    • 5. Public Relations Society of America Code of Ethics <ul><li>Professional Values: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Advocacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Honesty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Independence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loyalty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fairness </li></ul></ul>
    • 6. Are there Ethics in PR? <ul><li>Center for Public Integrity: criticize the public relations industry for a lack of ethics, counting the influence of public relations and lobbying as one of the primary threats to truthful journalism. </li></ul><ul><li>Corporate Watch: considers public relations as deliberately unethical; there is a considerable body of evidence emerging to suggest that modern public relations practices are having a significant negative impact on the democratic process. </li></ul><ul><li>Stanton Communications: believes it is the responsibility of the PR individual to join a company with high ethical standards </li></ul>
    • 7. Are there Ethics in PR? <ul><li>2005: a study concluded that while people valued the PR work, they also did not trust their motives. </li></ul><ul><li>2009: a study of graduate students concluded that the more people learned about PR, the higher their opinion of it was. </li></ul><ul><li>2010: in a Gallup Survey, more responded with a negative view of the Advertising and Public Relations field than those who responded positively. </li></ul>
    • 8. “I Work in PR” <ul><li>“ Are you serious?” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Why would you ever want to do that?” </li></ul><ul><li>“ So you want to be in a profession where you deceive everyone to further yourself?” </li></ul><ul><li>“ What is PR?” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Oh, I could do that” </li></ul>
    • 9. A Positive Result from PR <ul><li>Talk to the 5th Guy </li></ul><ul><li>The result of this humorous PR campaign was: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public awareness about the spread of germs in the workplace </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding of the importance of hygiene </li></ul></ul>
    • 10. Are There Ethics in PR? (opinions) <ul><li>As one PR professional explained, &quot;In addition to the standard duties, a PR person might have to shepherd an alcoholic and half-mad (but brilliant) author through a twenty-city interview tour or try to put a warm 'n fuzzy spin on the company's latest oil-spill.&quot; </li></ul>
    • 11. Thoughts <ul><li>The ability to engage in ethical reasoning in public relations is growing in demand, in responsibility, and in importance. </li></ul><ul><li>The future of public relations stands at a critical and defining juncture: whether to become an ethics counselor or to remain outside the realm of the strategic, decision-making core. </li></ul><ul><li>No single person or function can be the entire “ethical conscience” of an organization, but the public relations function is ideally informed to counsel top management about ethical issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Careful and consistent ethical analyses facilitate trust, which enhances the building and maintenance of relationships. </li></ul>
    • 12. Thoughts <ul><li>According to a study of 100 news media stories that had used public relations, fewer then 5% of them used it correctly. Researcher Julie K. Henderson wrote that 37% of stories used PR in a negative way and 17% used it properly. </li></ul>
    • 13. Professional Advice <ul><li>Ethics in Public Relations with Peter Stanton </li></ul>
    • 14. Work Cited <ul><li>1. Internet Encyclopedia of philosophy-Ethics. http://www.iep.utm.edu/ethics/ (2009) Retrieved Oct 19 </li></ul><ul><li>2. Ethics and Public Relations. http://www.instituteforpr.org/topics/ethics-and-public-relations/ (2007) Retrieved Oct 19 </li></ul><ul><li>3. http://www.corporatewatch.org.uk/?lid=1 (n.d) Retrieved Oct 19 </li></ul><ul><li>4. Ethical Public Relations: Not an Oxymoron. The PR desk can be a company's conscience. http://aboutpublicrelations.net/aa052701a.htm (n.d) Retrieved Oct 23 </li></ul><ul><li>5. Ethics in Public Relations. http://www.prcrossing.com/article/250181/Ethics-in-Public-Relations/ </li></ul><ul><li>6. Public Relations A values-Driven Approach (fifth addition) written by Guth Marsh and Charles Marsh </li></ul><ul><li>7. Stanton, Peter. “Ethics in Public Relations” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ih5p8qscU7w retrieved Oct 20 </li></ul><ul><li>8. http://aboutpublicrelations.net/uckelly11a.htm retrieved Oct 22 </li></ul><ul><li>9. http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos086.htm retrieved Oct 22 </li></ul><ul><li>10. http://www.5thguy.com/campaign.htm retrieved Oct 23 </li></ul>

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