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Constitution StGuide
 

Constitution StGuide

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    Constitution StGuide Constitution StGuide Presentation Transcript

    • Constitution Exam Study Guide chapter 3-6
    • Constitution History
      • Articles of Confederation: what was it and why didn’t it work as the U.S. Constitution?
      • What major issues and problems did the Constitutional Convention hope to solve?
    • Constitution History
      • Who were the major groups fighting at the Constitutional Convention?
      • Be able to explain and discuss the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan.
      • What were the Federalist Papers and why are they significant?
    • CHECKS and BALANCES
      • What does this mean?
      • Why this is included? (significance)
      • Why is the concept important—what does it do for democracy?
      • Specific examples (see p. 118 of text)
      • I might ask a question like:”Name two specific ways that Congress can check and balance” the executive branch”.
    • FEDERALISM: The Relationship between States and Washington
      • What does the Constitution say?
      • Why is it important?
      • Know some specific powers and how those powers are divided. (see p.122 of text)
      • In what other ways does the Federal government influence the states? (see p.135 of text)
    • FEDERALISM: History
      • Briefly know how the relationship between states and federal government has changed over the years and why. (pp.127-133)
    • POWERS
      • Know some specific duties of each branch of the government.
      • Know the qualification to hold each office.
    • AMENDMENTS
      • Know the amendment process: different ways amendments can be proposed and approved. (see p.144)
      • Also know how many votes it takes in each scenario. (see p.144)
    • BILL of RIGHTS
      • What is it and why was it included in the original Constitution?
      • Know about the relationship between the Bill of Rights and the States.
      • Know all you can about the 14 th amendment—it happens to be my favorite amendment! And also one of the most important.
    • FIRST AMENDMENT
      • What five rights does the 1 st amendment protect?
      • Be especially clear on Free Speech.
      • Why is it so important that alternative and even marginal speech and ideas should be heard and not oppressed by the majority— no matter how uncomfortable or unpopular those ideas may be?
    • OTHER KEY AMENDMENTS
      • 13,14,15 (Civil War amendments)
      • Voting Rights amendments
      • Rights of “criminals” amendments
    • ELECTORAL COLLEGE: How We Vote
      • Know how the Electoral College works and why it was instituted. (see Constitution and amendments)
      • Is the Electoral College representative? Is it fair?
      • Be familiar with other amendments that deal with the voting process and presidential succession: 12, 17, 20, 22, 23, 25.
    • Race and the Constitution
      • How did the Constitution treat African Americans after the Civil War?
      • What political strategies have been used by African Americans to gain their rights and end discrimination?
    • Gender and the Constitution
      • How has the Constitution treated women?
      • What political strategies have been used by women to gain their rights and end discrimination
    • TERMS
      • enumerated powers
      • necessary and proper clause
      • supremacy clause
      • concurrent powers
      • nullification
      • dual federalism
      • cooperative federalism
      • republic
      • judicial review
      • segregation
      • Marbury v. Madison
      • block grants
      • electoral college
      • unfunded mandates
      • Brown v. Board of Education
    • TERMS
      • Great Compromise
      • Bill of Rights
      • separation of powers
      • habeas corpus
      • prior restraint
      • Jim Crow laws
      • de facto and de jure discrimination
      • Black codes
      • Articles of Confederation
      • three-fifths Compromise
      • exclusionary rule
      • free exercise clause
      • literacy tests
      • Plessy v. Ferguson
      • boycott
    • Terms
      • Federalist Papers
      • Virginia Plan
      • unfunded mandates
      • Miller test
      • libel
      • grandfather clause
      • clear and present danger test
      • New Jersey Plan
      • ex post facto laws
      • bills of attainder
      • Lemon test
      • sedition
      • poll tax
      • due process of law