Jeff liew, pacific financial inclusion programme stakeholders' priorities and investment opportunities

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  • Intro: RJS, PFIP

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  • 1. STAKEHOLDERS’ PRIORITIES &INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES Jeff Liew jeff.liew@uncdf.org 1
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  • 3. MACRO LEVELEnabling environment for financial inclusion &empowerment of womenDevelopment framework & discourse recognizing culturaldiversity, political economy & Pacific realitiesNarrow the policy divergence between funders requiringscale and MFIs pursuing long term institutional and clientsustainabilityAppropriate & proportional regulatory regimeConsumer protection & market conductSector wide collective responsibility & accountabilitySupportive regulatory regime for MFS – agents, e-moneyGender strategy for FI 3
  • 4. MESO LEVELAppropriate data for strategy/policy design& performance measurementStrengthen research capacities & funding –impact of GBV, client demand, impact of MfMulti-sector platform for knowledgeexchange (Pacific-Global)Capacity building & accessible training – Mfleadership & operations, rights, BDS etcCredit bureaus – positive reporting 4
  • 5. MESO LEVELProduct marketing and facilitation servicesMf capacity building – change leadership 5
  • 6. MICRO LEVELRange of socially responsible and supervisedinstitutions catering to broad client baseProvision of client-friendly productsImprove service and efficiency including use oftechnologyStrong leadership & diversity (gender &cultural) – for change, innovation &effectivenessProvide women & mother friendly workplacesInvest in staff training 6
  • 7. CLIENT LEVELUnderstanding the financial behaviour of womenCatering to different segments and needs ofwomenRange of client-friendly products – based onrigorous client research & cultural contextCustomer care – relationship bankingAccess to effective client protection & rapidcomplaints managementPrevent indebtednessResponsive & cost-effective financial literacy anduser education 7
  • 8. CLIENT LEVELTailor MFS to women –convenience, reliability security and privacyTargeted marketing & awareness building andovercome psychological barriers to MFS 8
  • 9. PFIP STRATEGY & OUTPUTS – 2008-2013 Better Scalable and replicable policies, regulation, and projects with lower cost coordinated actions delivery channels 500,000 Better market Informed and information and competent access to knowledge consumers 9
  • 10. PFIP COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE: 2014-2017 Supportive Regulation & Policies - National financial inclusion & financial education strategies - Branchless banking – e-money trust, agent networks - New products – microinsurance - Consumer protection & market conduct 10
  • 11. PFIP COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE: 2014-2017 Catalyzing Innovation & Deepening Access - improve women’s access - viable agent business models - cost-effective remittance channels - sustainable credit (including agriculture, micro leasing) - inclusive insurance business models and products (community-based) - savings groups (beyond reach of MFS) 11
  • 12. PFIP COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE: 2014-2017 Demand-driven Knowledge Acquisition - demand/client research - product development - impact assessment - making data accessible to policy makers & practitioners - information exchanges, leadership scholarships Financial Competency Building - tailoring financial literacy to women - establish baseline & measuring impact - strategies for financial education curriculum in schools - cost-effective financial literacy & user education 12