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Snowboarding<br />By:Jacob Howell<br />
Thesis<br />Snowboarding is an up and coming sport, and more and more people are starting to snowboard every year. Snowboa...
Overview<br />-What does it mean to me<br />-What a snowboard is<br />-The Snowboard Culture<br />-History<br />-Evolution...
What does it mean to me<br />Snowboarding is therapeutic to me<br />It gives me a feeling of freedom and adventure<br />Ho...
What is a Snowboard?<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Pr...
The Snowboarding Culture<br />How are snowboarders viewed?<br />What are the different genres within snowboarding?<br /> J...
Interviews<br />
The History of Snowboarding<br />When was Snowboarding Invented?<br />Where was Snowboarding Invented?<br />Who designed t...
TheEvolution of Snowboarding<br />What has it become?<br />How many people snowboard?<br />	Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downe...
TheEvolution of Snowboarding continued<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Moun...
AdaptiveSnowboarding<br />-  Mayo, Ryan. “The Hottest Sport on the Slope.” Adaptive Snowboarding 1 Dec. 1999: 72-74. eLibr...
Snowboarding & everyday life<br />How is snowboarding connected with<br />MEDIA<br />FASHION<br />-  Stepanek, Chris. "Whe...
Snowboarding & everyday life<br />MEDIA<br />VIDEO GAMES<br />Stepanek, Chris. "When Did Snowboarding Become Cool?" WWW.YO...
Types of Snowboarding<br />Back-Woods Snowboarding (Powder Riding)<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowbo...
Types of Snowboarding Continued<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Pres...
Types of Snowboarding Continued<br />Freestyle Snowboarding/ Half-Pipe ( Park Riding)<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultura...
Types of Snowboarding continued<br />Freestyle Snowboarding/ Big Air ( Park Riding)<br />
Types of Snowboarding Continued<br />Half-Pipe ( Park Riding)<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboardin...
Shawn White<br />
Typesof Snowboarding Continued<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press...
Typesof Snowboarding Continued<br />Unique<br />Free<br />Very Similar to Skateboarding <br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cult...
Typesof Snowboarding Continue<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press,...
Slalom Snowboarding<br />Slalom Snowboarding<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragge...
Obstacles & Features<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. ...
Obstacles & Features Continued<br />
Types of Snowboards<br />Slalom Snowboards<br />-  Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragg...
Types of Snowboards<br />Street Formulas/Half-Pipe & Terrain Park Snowboards<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Com...
Types of Snowboards<br />Powder / Back-woods snowboards<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Ca...
Bindings & Boots<br />Strap-In Bindings<br />Strap-in style Bindings<br />-  Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete...
Bindings & Boots Continued<br />Clip-In Bindings<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: R...
Bindings & Boots Continued<br />Snowboard Boots, DC, Vans, Nike<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboa...
Popular  Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.<br />-  Montgomery, Cliff. "The Top 10 Places to Snowboard." ExtremeProSports....
Popular  Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.<br />Tahoe, California<br />Montgomery, Cliff. "The Top 10 Places to Snowboard...
Popular  Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.<br />Killington, Vermont<br />Montgomery, Cliff. "The Top 10 Places to Snowboa...
Prices<br />How much does a snowboard cost?<br />How much does a trip to the mountains cost/<br />How much does the appare...
Famous Snowboarders<br />Shawn White<br />Gretchen Bleiler<br />Kelly Clark <br />
Where can I get a snowboard?<br />Buckmans Ski Shop<br />Zumies <br />Sports Authority<br />
Application<br />Building a Homemade Snowboard<br />
1st Step<br />Buy Large sheet of Pine wood from Home Depot<br />
2nd Step<br />Have Model Snowboard for shape and size<br />
3rd Step<br />Trace snowboard dimensions on sheet of wood<br />
4th Step<br />Make precise measurements to make sure the Snowboard is the right size<br />
5th Step<br />Cut two Snowboard shapes out of the wood with a jig saw.<br />
6th Step<br />Warp the two boards <br />
7th Step<br />Separately clamp the boards to the snowboard that you’re modeling<br />
8thStep<br />Epoxy the two boards, sandwich them together, clamp them together, and let them sit and dry for two days<br />
9thStep<br />Sand the whole board down<br />
10thStep<br />Put wood finisher on it<br />
11thStep<br />Paint your logo on<br />
Jake Howell’s Snowboarding Video<br />
Conclusion<br />I learned more about snowboarding while working on this project than I ever imagined, and I am now more pa...
Work Cited<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.  <br ...
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  • And so it begins
  • ThesisSnowboarding is an up and coming sport, and more and more people are starting to s5678 89576uirtygm nowboardevery year. Snowboarding means freedom, adventure, and exploration to me, and I planto show everyone in the class what snowboarding is all about.
  • -What does it mean to me-What a snowboard is-The Snowboard Culture-History-Evolution-Adaptive Snowboarding-Snowboarding and Everyday Life-Media-Types of Snowboarding-Obstacles and Features-Types of Snowboards-Bindings &amp; Boots-Locations-Prices -Famous Snowboarders-Where to Buy a Snowboard-Application-Work Cited
  • What does it mean to me-Snowboarding is extremely therapeutic to me. I always feel completely stress free and refreshed when I go up to the mountains and smell that crisp mountain air. -I feel free when I am gliding down the mountain at mass amounts of speed. I am competitive and adventurous, so when I am up the mountains I can compete and push my abilities when I am along side my companions.-I have been snowboarding ever since I was thirteen, and skateboarding ever since I was nine, so I have been on a “board” for eight years, but specifically on a snowboard for four years.
  • What is a SnowboardI will proceed to talk about the nose, front of the board, tail, back of the board, bindings, and other things that the snowboard is comprised of. The tail is the back of the board The nose is the front of the board Base is the bottom of the board Edge is the metal edges in the sides of the snowboard to keep an edge in the snow.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print
  • How is the snowboard culture viewed?-The snowboard culture is viewed as a culture of rude and rambunctious punks. Many people think that they cut people off and take up the mountain with their bright colored outfits, and their loud behavior. In many cases I find this stereotype to be true, but this stereotype only seems to be true in the terrain park and more competitive parts of the mountain.- The two genres of snowboarders are park riders and non-park riders. Park riders are much more rude, and non-park riders are much more classy and laid back.More of the people that don’t ride terrain are just out there to have a good time, while most of the guys in the terrain park are in there to show that they are “the best”, and no one is better or cooler than them.-“I’ll show the interviews video”MLAJarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Canadian Geographic 1 Nov. 2007: 35-39. eLibrary. Web. 2 Dec. 2009
  • The History of snowboarding-Some say Sherman Poppen made the first snowboard in 1965 in Muskegon, Michigan.- The first snowboard was actually created by Vern Wicklund, who at the age of 13, was the first to fashion a purpose-built snowboard around 1917 in the town of Cloquet, Minnesota. On November 28, 1939, he patented the snowboard, it was number 2,181,391 to three people: Vern C. Wicklund, Harvey W. Burgeson, and Gunmnar E. Burgeson.Snowboarding-Turkey is the first place people started standing sideways on boards and gliding down hills over 150 years ago. The sport was started out of necessity to get around the village in deep snow. They didn’t patent the snowboard, or even consider it a snowboard, it was just transportation for them.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • The Evolution of Snowboarding-Snowboarding has gone from being a silly hobby to a stable source of income for many pros, and an important part of many peoples winters.-In 1998 Snowboarding made it to the Olympics. This included half-pipe events (freestyle snowboarding), and the Giant Slalom events (traditional ski snowboarding).-About 2.1 million Americans aged 7 and older participated in snowboarding in 1994, compared with 1.3 million in 1988.-In 2007 the National Ski and Snowboarders Retailers Association recorded that 5.5 million people snowboard in the U.S.-By 1990, most of the big resorts offered separate slopes for snowboarders, but now 98% of resorts allow snowboarders to ride on the mountains.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. PrintMaguire, Tom. &quot;Snowboarding Reaches Critical Mass at Slopes.&quot; BNET. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. &lt;http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4021/is_2_21/      ai_53914738/&gt;.
  • The Evolution of Snowboarding-There are many small-scale competitions and events that go on for snowboarders, but some of the more recognized and popular ones include the dew tour, and the x-games. The dew tour is a competition that is comprised of the best snowboarders in the world and the competition lasts for about a week. The winner take home $1.5 million. The x-game is very similar to the dew tour, although the x-games aren’t as long as the dew tour, the x-games have been around longer than the dew tour. Both of the events are aired on ESPN.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. PrintMaguire, Tom. &quot;Snowboarding Reaches Critical Mass at Slopes.&quot; BNET. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. &lt;http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4021/is_2_21/      ai_53914738/&gt;.
  • Adaptive Snowboarding I will be talking about how adaptive snowboarding is an outlet for many disabled people, and how it includes many people with many different problems.Snowboarding caters to many disabled, this includes the visual impairment, hearing impairments, amputations, brain injuries, and developmental disabilities. I will also be talking about the how snowboarding gives the disabled a feeling of purpose and excitement.Adaptive winter sports have continued to be one of the best recreation activities for children with disabilities, in terms of accessibility and enjoyment. Snowboarding is an ideal sport for children with visual impairments, hearing impairments, amputations, brain injuries, and developmental disabilities. MLAMayo, Ryan. “The Hottest Sport on the Slope.” Adaptive Snowboarding 1 Dec. 1999: 72-74. eLibrary. Web. 2 Dec. 2009.
  • Snowboarding &amp; everyday life Snowboarding is sport that is growing rapidly in society and in the media.People are starting to watch it on TV, with extreme sports channels like Fuel TV, and selective events that are aired on ESPN like the x-games and other events that take place worldwide. Many snowboarders wear flannels shirts and bright colored jackets that various companies like Burton, Volcom, Vans, and Billabong design. This has become a popular style amongst youthful snowboarders, and non-snowboarders all over the country.MLAStepanek, Chris. &quot;When Did Snowboarding Become Cool?&quot; WWW.YOBEAT.COM. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. &lt;http://www.yobeat.com/features/snowboardcool.htm&gt;. Stoked: Big Air Edition and U.S. Snowboarding Team Up.” U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association. United States Ski Team: Home of the Brave /‌ United States Ski and Snowboard Association, 23 Nov. 2009. Web. 2 Dec. 2009. &lt;http://www.ussnowboarding.com//?storyId=2061.
  • Snowboarding &amp; everyday life-Different companies like Transworld and 411 release magazines that feature all the biggest and badest tricks that snowboarders are pulling off. They also include many adds that promote different snowboards, snowboard gear and upcoming snowboarding events.Video games are a big part of our culture today, and the snowboard community has recognized this. There are many different snowboard games that have been released over the years, but some of the most recent games are Stoked on XBOX 360, and the Shawn White game on the wii.-There are numerous snowboard videos that different companies come out with on a daily basis, like Burton’s The B film, and many others that companies are constantly releasing.MLAStepanek, Chris. &quot;When Did Snowboarding Become Cool?&quot; WWW.YOBEAT.COM. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. &lt;http://www.yobeat.com/features/snowboardcool.htm&gt;. Stoked: Big Air Edition and U.S. Snowboarding Team Up.” U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association. United States Ski Team: Home of the Brave /‌ United States Ski and Snowboard Association, 23 Nov. 2009. Web. 2 Dec. 2009. &lt;http://www.ussnowboarding.com//?storyId=2061.
  • Types of SnowboardingBack-Woods Snowboarding is a form of snowboarding that involves a much more natural and laid back terrain. Back-Woods snowboarding is the most natural and original style of snowboarding. The first snowboarders shredded powder only, and all they wanted to do was ride down a beautiful snow covered mountain.Back-Woods snowboarding can be free, but in many cases it includes a hefty lift ticket fee, or if you are more adventurous a helicopter or snow mobile.It can involve tougher obstacles and challenges depending on the area and type of mountain that you&apos;re on. In most cases it involves a long powdery run down the side of a beautiful powder covered mountain. MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Types of SnowboardingAlthough Back-Woods riding can be easier and very relaxed, other forms involve big cliff drops, steep vertical mountain faces, and occasional avalanches.Many snowboarders have been seriously injured and even killed while riding back-woods, usually injuries are caused by unexpected cliffs rocks or avalanches.It is strongly recommended for back-woods snowboarders to go with either a partner or group of people, for safety.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Types of Snowboarding continuedFreestyle snowboarding can be much more diverse, and dangerous than other forms of snowboarding. Freestyle snowboarding is one of the most well known or familiar types of snowboarding to the outside world or those that aren’t associated with or accustomed to the snowboarding culture.-Many freestyle snowboarders are much more competitive, and seem to have an attitude where they have to be the very best. Often times this leads to bright vivacious outfits, and arrogance (to bring attention to themselves.) Not all freestyle snowboarders are like that though, and many seem to be well rounded confident riders.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Types of Snowboarding-Freestyle snowboarding is much more risky, and dangerous. It ranges from large ramps with 60ft flats, to small features like a rainbow rail or flat bar rail. It is expensive and risky, this makes it much more difficult for people to do. It is still one of the most popular forms of snowboarding.-Many people who try snowboarding for their first time have a hard time enjoying themselves because they see people executing trilling and dangerous maneuvers in the terrain park and they can hardly ride down the mountain without falling, but skill in the terrain park doesn’t come easy. It takes a very long time to get to a point where you can comfortable ride in a terrain park, and it isn’t advised for beginners to ride anywhere but the bunny slope.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Types of Snowboarding-Many snowboarders who ride freestyle are also familiarized with the half-pipe, and other types of terrain.-Half-pipe riding is usually executed within a snowboard competition or at a more advanced terrain park.-The idea of the half-pipe came from the skateboarders, but it was just a matter of time for it to hit the snow.-Half-pipes are a very dangerous, and usually extremely icy and unsafe, they are meant for pros and experienced snowboarders. Half-pipes are just what they sound like, two vertical ramps that are facing each other that look like a pipe that is cut in half.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • I will show the video of Shawn White, Olympics 2010
  • Street SnowboardingStreet snowboarding is a much more modern/ up and coming genre of snowboarding. Many people are street snowboarding now because they see all the pro’s doing it in the videos, and it doesn’t cost money like a ski resort would. Street snowboards are usually very hard-core and even a little grungy. Street snowboarders have taken on many of the stereotypes that are placed on skateboarders.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Street Snowboarding-Many people who street snowboard have a much more skateboarder like style.Some Examples of street snowboarding include Hand rails, street gaps, stairs, walls and basically anything that is challenging and fun looking to ride.Street snowboarding is extremely unique, and many of the tricks that are done during a street session are very original and unique.Street snowboarding can either be very risky or not risky at all. It just depends on the obstacle or trick that is being attempted.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Street Snowboarding-I enjoy street snowboarding very much, because I used to skateboard. I would pick a real mountain with fresh powder over a street spot any day though.MLASusanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Slalom Snowboarding-Slalom snowboarding is much different than other types of snowboarding. -Slalom snowboarding involves a snowboarder and a racing course. Many times a slalom race is done in a competition and the snowboarder with the best time to the bottom wins.-Slalom racers race downhill through sets of gates that force extremely tight turns, requiring plenty of technical skill as well as speed. Some slalom racers reach speeds up to 45mph.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print.
  • Obstacles &amp; FeaturesThere are numerous obstacles and or features at any given mountain. There are novice terrain parks and there are expert terrain parks. Expert terrain usually have huge ramps, hand rails, a half pipe, and other random features that hold originality and authenticity. The novice terrain parks are much easier to ride, and they are meant to cater to the needs of children, beginners, and those who are trying to stay safe.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print.
  • Obstacles &amp; FeaturesThe number of injuries is much higher in the terrain park, and many people leave on stretchers with ski patrol when riding on ramps like the one above.The obstacles and features at a mountain will not usually be the same, and many times they aren’t kept up, and that is usually when injuries occur.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print.
  • Types of SnowboardingThe Slalom board is a much different board than the other types of snowboards. It is a single kick board, and it is much stiffer and skinnier than other boards. It also costs more than other snowboards, and this usually leads to less sales with slalom boards. Not many people slalom snowboard, and this results in less sales for slalom style snowboards.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Types of SnowboardingThe street formula snowboard is meant for the Half-pipe, terrain park, and street. This board is asymmetrical, flexible, and it usually has a very vivacious and loud logo or design.The street formula snowboard is asymmetrical, flexible so the rider can ride in either direction without being effected, and the board is flexible so it doesn’t break while the rider is doing dangerous and risky maneuvers.I own a street formula Burton snowboard, and it easy to keep up, and it was purchased at a reasonable price. I recommend the street formula snowboard to everybody, and they are reliable and good to learn and progress on.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Types of Snowboarding The powder board/ back woods board is usually much wider, more stiff, and the nose is bigger than the tail.The board is designed to appeal to more mature riders and they usually cost the same as a street formula snowboard.The snowboard is wider and stiffer than other boards because it helps the snowboarder stay on top of the soft fluffy powder rather than sinking in.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.
  • Bindings &amp; Boots The Strap in Bindings can usually fit with any style of boot besides a clip in boot. They have two straps that come over the top of the snowboard boot, and they keep the ankle very secure.Most people that snowboard use strap in bindings.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print.
  • Bindings and Boots-Clip in bindings are much more stiff, and the design is made to fit with the select boot that was purchased along with the binding. -Many downhill racers, and slalom snowboarders use clip in bindings.-Clip in binding are usually more expensive than strap in bindings and they are not as “hip” as strap in bindings.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print.
  • Bindings and BootsBoots are always extremely stiff, and very hard to tie because they are built to keep you warm, and to keep your ankles from rolling or twisting. Many companies like Vans, DC shoes, Burton, Ride, Nike, and Thirty-two carry top quality snowboard boots. Finding comfortable snowboard boots can be difficult sometimes, but if one wants to spend a couple extra dollars one can find a very comfortable and supportive pair of boots.MLABennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print.
  • Popular Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.-Colorado is known for its beautiful spring sessions, some Aprils have four feet of snow, and May sometimes adds another two to three feet of powder.MLAMontgomery, Cliff. &quot;The Top 10 Places to Snowboard.&quot; ExtremeProSports.com. N.p.,      n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010. &lt;http://www.extremeprosports.com/snowboarding/      index.html&gt;.
  • Popular Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.-Tahoe is know for the altitude, wide open bowls, arching ridge line and long gullies that accommodate the steep chutes, crisp corduroy trails, and hair-raising cliff drops.MLAMontgomery, Cliff. &quot;The Top 10 Places to Snowboard.&quot; ExtremeProSports.com. N.p.,      n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010. &lt;http://www.extremeprosports.com/snowboarding/      index.html&gt;.
  • Popular Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.Vermont is usuallythe first-to-open and the last-to-close resort in New England. It maintains its snow better than any other northeastern mountain, and it is known for its beautiful powdery runs through the woods.I have been to Vermont, and I can say that it is one of the most beautiful places that I have snowboarded at.The snow is pristine, and the mountains are much bigger than anything that I have ever snowboarded here in P.A.MLAMontgomery, Cliff. &quot;The Top 10 Places to Snowboard.&quot; ExtremeProSports.com. N.p.,      n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010. &lt;http://www.extremeprosports.com/snowboarding/      index.html&gt;.
  • PricesA decent snowboard set up, Board, Bindings and Boots could range from about $375 to $500A day trip up to Jack Frost on a weekend would cost $48 for an adult pass, and $42 for a youth pass.Snowboard gear can be expensive, a jacket, snowboard pants, gloves, goggles, and a hat for around $470Overall snowboarding is an expensive sport, and it can be very pricey.
  • Famous Snowboarders- The worlds most famous snowboarder without a doubt is the two time Olympic gold medalist Shawn White.- Although women are not usually as gung ho into snowboarding a couple of women like Gretchen Bleiler, and Kelly Clark have made a career out of snowboarding, and not only a career, but a name for themselves.
  • Where can I get a Snowboard?-Some of the places that I recommend to people if they are trying to keep it local are Buckmans Ski Shop, Zumies, and Sports Authority. Buckmans.-Buckmans is personally my favorite shop, because they have many more selections to pick from, but one could obtain all one needs for snowboarding from any of the three stores.
  • Buy Large sheet of Pine wood from Home Depot
  • Have Model Snowboard for shape and size
  • Trace snowboard dimensions on sheet of wood
  • Make precise measurements to make sure the Snowboard is the right size
  • Cut two Snowboard shapes out of the wood with a jig saw.
  • Warp the two boards
  • Separately clamp the boards to the snowboard that you’re modeling
  • Epoxy the two boards, sandwich them together, clamp them together, and let them sit and dry for two days
  • Sand the whole board down
  • Put wood finisher on it
  • Paint your logo on
  • I learned more about snowboarding while working on this project than I ever imagined, and I am now more passionate about it than ever. I hope that snowboarding will continue to progress at the rate that it has been in the past couple years, and I thoroughly enjoy my winters because of it.
  • Transcript of "Sgp Snowboarding"

    1. 1. Snowboarding<br />By:Jacob Howell<br />
    2. 2. Thesis<br />Snowboarding is an up and coming sport, and more and more people are starting to snowboard every year. Snowboarding means freedom, adventure, and exploration to me, and I plan to show everyone in the class what snowboarding is all about. <br />
    3. 3. Overview<br />-What does it mean to me<br />-What a snowboard is<br />-The Snowboard Culture<br />-History<br />-Evolution<br />-Adaptive Snowboarding<br />-Snowboarding and Everyday Life<br />-Media<br />-Types of Snowboarding<br />-Obstacles and Features<br />-Types of Snowboards<br />-Bindings & Boots<br />-Locations<br />-Prices <br />-Famous Snowboarders<br />-Where to Buy a Snowboard<br />-Application<br />-Work Cited<br />
    4. 4. What does it mean to me<br />Snowboarding is therapeutic to me<br />It gives me a feeling of freedom and adventure<br />How long have I been snowboarding<br />Snowboarding is therapeutic to me.<br />It gives me a feeling of freedom and adventure.<br />How long have I been Snowboarding?<br />
    5. 5. What is a Snowboard?<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print <br />
    6. 6. The Snowboarding Culture<br />How are snowboarders viewed?<br />What are the different genres within snowboarding?<br /> Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Canadian Geographic 1 Nov. 2007: 35-39. eLibrary. Web. 2 Dec. 2009<br />How areSnowboarders viewed?<br />What are the different genres withinSnowboarding?<br />
    7. 7. Interviews<br />
    8. 8. The History of Snowboarding<br />When was Snowboarding Invented?<br />Where was Snowboarding Invented?<br />Who designed the first Snowboard?<br />What did the first Snowboard look like?<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />When was the Snowboard Invented?<br />Where was Snowboarding Invented?<br />Who designed the first Snowboard?<br />What did the first Snowboard look like?<br />
    9. 9. TheEvolution of Snowboarding<br />What has it become?<br />How many people snowboard?<br /> Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print Maguire, Tom. "Snowboarding Reaches Critical Mass at Slopes." BNET. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4021/is_2_21/      ai_53914738/>. <br />What has Snowboarding become?<br />How many people Snowboard?<br />1998, Snowboarding makes it to Olympics.<br />98% of Ski Resorts allow snowboarding on their mountains.<br />
    10. 10. TheEvolution of Snowboarding continued<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print <br />Maguire, Tom. "Snowboarding Reaches Critical Mass at Slopes." BNET. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4021/is_2_21/      ai_53914738/>. <br />
    11. 11. AdaptiveSnowboarding<br />- Mayo, Ryan. “The Hottest Sport on the Slope.” Adaptive Snowboarding 1 Dec. 1999: 72-74. eLibrary. Web. 2 Dec. 2009. <br />Adaptive winter sports have continued to be one of the best recreation activities for children with disabilities, in terms of accessibility and enjoyment. <br />Snowboarding is an ideal sport for children with visual impairments, hearing impairments, amputations, brain injuries, and developmental disabilities. <br />
    12. 12. Snowboarding & everyday life<br />How is snowboarding connected with<br />MEDIA<br />FASHION<br />- Stepanek, Chris. "When Did Snowboarding Become Cool?" WWW.YOBEAT.COM. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://www.yobeat.com/features/snowboardcool.htm>. <br />- Stoked: Big Air Edition and U.S. Snowboarding Team Up.” U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association. United States Ski Team: Home of the Brave /‌ United States Ski and Snowboard Association, 23 Nov. 2009. Web. 2 Dec. 2009. <http://www.ussnowboarding.com//?storyId=2061. <br />
    13. 13. Snowboarding & everyday life<br />MEDIA<br />VIDEO GAMES<br />Stepanek, Chris. "When Did Snowboarding Become Cool?" WWW.YOBEAT.COM. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://www.yobeat.com/features/snowboardcool.htm>. <br />Stoked: Big Air Edition and U.S. Snowboarding Team Up.” U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association. United States Ski Team: Home of the Brave /‌ United States Ski and Snowboard Association, 23 Nov. 2009. Web. 2 Dec. 2009. <http://www.ussnowboarding.com//?storyId=2061. <br />
    14. 14. Types of Snowboarding<br />Back-Woods Snowboarding (Powder Riding)<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />Back-Woods Snowboarding (Powder Riding)<br />
    15. 15. Types of Snowboarding Continued<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />
    16. 16. Types of Snowboarding Continued<br />Freestyle Snowboarding/ Half-Pipe ( Park Riding)<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />
    17. 17. Types of Snowboarding continued<br />Freestyle Snowboarding/ Big Air ( Park Riding)<br />
    18. 18. Types of Snowboarding Continued<br />Half-Pipe ( Park Riding)<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />
    19. 19. Shawn White<br />
    20. 20. Typesof Snowboarding Continued<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />Street Snowboarding (Street riding)<br />
    21. 21. Typesof Snowboarding Continued<br />Unique<br />Free<br />Very Similar to Skateboarding <br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />
    22. 22. Typesof Snowboarding Continue<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />
    23. 23. Slalom Snowboarding<br />Slalom Snowboarding<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. <br />
    24. 24. Obstacles & Features<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. <br />Rails, Ramps, and Random features<br />
    25. 25. Obstacles & Features Continued<br />
    26. 26. Types of Snowboards<br />Slalom Snowboards<br />- Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. <br />- Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />
    27. 27. Types of Snowboards<br />Street Formulas/Half-Pipe & Terrain Park Snowboards<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. <br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />
    28. 28. Types of Snowboards<br />Powder / Back-woods snowboards<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print.<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print. <br />
    29. 29. Bindings & Boots<br />Strap-In Bindings<br />Strap-in style Bindings<br />- Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. <br />
    30. 30. Bindings & Boots Continued<br />Clip-In Bindings<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. <br />
    31. 31. Bindings & Boots Continued<br />Snowboard Boots, DC, Vans, Nike<br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print. <br />
    32. 32. Popular Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.<br />- Montgomery, Cliff. "The Top 10 Places to Snowboard." ExtremeProSports.com. N.p.,      n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010. <http://www.extremeprosports.com/snowboarding/      index.html>. <br />Summit County, Colorado<br />
    33. 33. Popular Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.<br />Tahoe, California<br />Montgomery, Cliff. "The Top 10 Places to Snowboard." ExtremeProSports.com. N.p.,      n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010. <http://www.extremeprosports.com/snowboarding/      index.html>. <br />
    34. 34. Popular Locations to Snowboard in the U.S.<br />Killington, Vermont<br />Montgomery, Cliff. "The Top 10 Places to Snowboard." ExtremeProSports.com. N.p.,      n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010. <http://www.extremeprosports.com/snowboarding/      index.html>. <br />
    35. 35. Prices<br />How much does a snowboard cost?<br />How much does a trip to the mountains cost/<br />How much does the apparel cost?<br />
    36. 36. Famous Snowboarders<br />Shawn White<br />Gretchen Bleiler<br />Kelly Clark <br />
    37. 37. Where can I get a snowboard?<br />Buckmans Ski Shop<br />Zumies <br />Sports Authority<br />
    38. 38. Application<br />Building a Homemade Snowboard<br />
    39. 39. 1st Step<br />Buy Large sheet of Pine wood from Home Depot<br />
    40. 40. 2nd Step<br />Have Model Snowboard for shape and size<br />
    41. 41. 3rd Step<br />Trace snowboard dimensions on sheet of wood<br />
    42. 42. 4th Step<br />Make precise measurements to make sure the Snowboard is the right size<br />
    43. 43. 5th Step<br />Cut two Snowboard shapes out of the wood with a jig saw.<br />
    44. 44. 6th Step<br />Warp the two boards <br />
    45. 45. 7th Step<br />Separately clamp the boards to the snowboard that you’re modeling<br />
    46. 46. 8thStep<br />Epoxy the two boards, sandwich them together, clamp them together, and let them sit and dry for two days<br />
    47. 47. 9thStep<br />Sand the whole board down<br />
    48. 48. 10thStep<br />Put wood finisher on it<br />
    49. 49. 11thStep<br />Paint your logo on<br />
    50. 50. Jake Howell’s Snowboarding Video<br />
    51. 51. Conclusion<br />I learned more about snowboarding while working on this project than I ever imagined, and I am now more passionate about it than ever. I hope that snowboarding will continue to progress at the rate that it has been in the past couple years, and I thoroughly enjoy my winters because of it.<br />
    52. 52. Work Cited<br />Susanna, Howe. (Sick) A Cultural History of Snowboarding. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Print.  <br />Bennett, Jeff, and Scott Downey. The Complete Snowboarder. Camden: Ragged Mountain Press, 1994. Print  <br />Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Jarman, Mark Anthony. “Powder Trip.” Canadian Geographic 1 Nov. 2007: 35-39. eLibrary. Web. 2 Dec. 2009  <br />Maguire, Tom. "Snowboarding Reaches Critical Mass at Slopes." BNET. N.p., n.d.      Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4021/is_2_21/      ai_53914738/>.  <br />Mayo, Ryan. “The Hottest Sport on the Slope.” Adaptive Snowboarding 1 Dec. 1999: 72-74. eLibrary. Web. 2 Dec. 2009.  <br />Stepanek, Chris. "When Did Snowboarding Become Cool?" WWW.YOBEAT.COM. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://www.yobeat.com/features/snowboardcool.htm>.  <br />Stoked: Big Air Edition and U.S. Snowboarding Team Up.” U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association. United States Ski Team: Home of the Brave /‌ United States Ski and Snowboard Association, 23 Nov. 2009. Web. 2 Dec. 2009. <http://www.ussnowboarding.com//?storyId=2061. <br />Montgomery, Cliff. "The Top 10 Places to Snowboard." ExtremeProSports.com. N.p.,      n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010. <http://www.extremeprosports.com/snowboarding/      index.html>. <br />
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

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