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The problems with visualizations and the need for visualization literacy research The problems with visualizations and the need for visualization literacy research Presentation Transcript

  •  The  problems  with   visualiza3ons   and  the  need  for  visualiza3on  literacy   research  Kamakshi  Rajagopal,  Open  University  of  the  Netherlands    Wolfgang  Reinhardt,  University  of  Paderborn    Riina  Vuorikari,  European  Schoolnet  
  • OUR  MOTIVATION  FOR  THE  PAPER   2  
  • Visualiza3ons  are  not  easy  •  widespread  anecdotal  evidence  that   visualiza3on  support  the  understanding  of   complex  rela3onships   –  designers  decide  on  how  to  present  data   –  designers  are  limited  by  the  used  technology   –  designers  are  limited  by  their  understanding  of   the  data   –  oCen  you  don‘t  know  about  the  competences  of   your  readers   3  
  • Simple  examples   4   hGp://stellar.know-­‐center.tugraz.at/vis/streamgraph/  
  • Simple  examples   5   Reinhardt,  Drachsler,  Sloep  (2011)  
  • Simple  examples   6   Nagel,  Duval,  Heidmann  (2011)  
  • Simple  examples   InMaps   7  
  • ETWINNING  AS  AN  EXAMPLE   8  
  • The  eTwinning  Network  •  Network  of  teachers  and  schools  across   Europe  •  Collabora3ve  cross-­‐border  school  projects   using  ICT  •  the  Tellnet  project  (hGp://tellnet.eun.org)   studies  eTwinning  as  a  social  network   9  
  • Source:  SNA  of  eTwinning    done  by  RWTH  Aachen  showing  teachers   10  
  • The  goals  of  eTwinning  •  Play  a  role  in  teachers’  con3nuous   professional  development  and  lifelong   learning  at  European  level  as  well  as  at     na3onal  and  local  level  •  raise  awareness  about  poten3al  partners  an   being  part  of  the  larger  network  •  engage  (isolated)  teachers   11  
  • A  business  case  for  visualiza3on  •  The  eTwinning  Network   –  Insight  into  network  structure  could  offer   individual  members  more  reasons  to  engage  &   recommenda3on  with  whom  to  connect   –  more  scope  for  professional  development  through   the  network  •  complex  analyses  and  visualiza3ons  to  provide   feedback,  intended  to  create  change  in   behavior   12  
  • A  PRELIMINARY  ROADMAP  TO  GAIN  MORE  UNDERSTANDING  IN  VISUALIZATION  LITERACY   13  
  • Twofold  study  approach  •  overall  goal   –  gain  understanding  of  the  readability  of   visualiza3ons   –  impact  of  prior  social  media  usage  and  technical   knowledge  on  visualiza3on  literacy   –  iden3fy  different  roles  of  eTwinners  and  give   recommenda3ons  for  different  visualiza3ons  for   different  types  of  users   14  
  • Twofold  study  approach  •  1st  step   –  controlled  experiment  with  fic3onal  social   network   –  no  „social  truths“   –  What  do  people  read  from  visualiza3ons?   –  What  do  they  become  aware  of?   –  Do  different  visualiza3ons  of  the  same  facts  lead   to  different  knowledge  gained?   15  
  • Twofold  study  approach  •  2nd  step   –  based  on  1st  step‘s  results   –  experiment  with  eTwinners   –  Do  the  visualiza3ons  help  eTwinners  to  reflect  on   their  behavior?  In  what  way?   –  Do  they  serve  as  trigger  to  actually  change   behavior?  How  and  in  which  way?   –  How  do  different  visualiza3ons  of  the  same  data   impact  on  awareness,  reflec3on  and  changed   behavior?   16  
  • Thank  you  and  let‘s  discuss  Kamakshi  Rajagopal,  Wolfgang  Reinhardt,  Riina  Vuorikari   17  
  • FURTHER  QUESTIONS  DRIVING  OUR  WORK   18  
  • Further  ques3ons  (visualiza3on)  •  What  cons3tutes  a  good  visualiza3on?  •  Can  visualiza3ons  be  objec3ve?  •  Can  easy-­‐to-­‐read  visualiza3ons  contain  the  full   data?    •  What  do  different  visualiza3ons  convey?    •  Where  is  the  difference  exactly?  And  how  can   we  use  it  to  our  advantage?   19  
  • Further  ques3ons  (stakeholder)  •  LiGle  insight  on  how  visualiza3ons  are  read  by   different  stakeholders  •  Will  consumers  read  visualiza3ons  like   intended  by  the  creator?  •  What  skills  are  needed  for  crea3ng  and   reading  visualiza3ons?  •  Do  visualiza3ons  make  the  users  reflect  on   their  own  behaviour?     20