Tcl 10e crs_ch11

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  • Text Reference: Key Issue 1 … Where is industry distributed? Difficulty Level: 4 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 12 THE PROCESSES, PATTERNS, AND FUNCTIONS OF HUMAN SETTLEMENT
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 2 … Why do industries have different distributions? Difficulty Level: 4 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 3 HOW TO ANALYZE THE SPATIAL ORGANIZATION OF PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 12 THE PROCESSES, PATTERNS, AND FUNCTIONS OF HUMAN SETTLEMENT GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 18 HOW TO APPLY GEOGRAPHY TO INTERPRET THE PRESENT AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 1 … U.S. Industrial Areas Difficulty Level: 2 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 12 THE PROCESSES, PATTERNS, AND FUNCTIONS OF HUMAN SETTLEMENT
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 2 … Proximity to Markets Difficulty Level: 2 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 3 HOW TO ANALYZE THE SPATIAL ORGANIZATION OF PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 18 HOW TO APPLY GEOGRAPHY TO INTERPRET THE PRESENT AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 2 … Proximity to markets Difficulty Level: 3 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 3 HOW TO ANALYZE THE SPATIAL ORGANIZATION OF PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 18 HOW TO APPLY GEOGRAPHY TO INTERPRET THE PRESENT AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 2 … Ship, Rail, Truck, or Air? Difficulty Level: 2 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 3 HOW TO ANALYZE THE SPATIAL ORGANIZATION OF PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 18 HOW TO APPLY GEOGRAPHY TO INTERPRET THE PRESENT AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 2 … Labor Difficulty Level: 2 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 3 HOW TO ANALYZE THE SPATIAL ORGANIZATION OF PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 18 HOW TO APPLY GEOGRAPHY TO INTERPRET THE PRESENT AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 2 … Land Difficulty Level: 2 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 3 HOW TO ANALYZE THE SPATIAL ORGANIZATION OF PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 3 … Interregional Shifts in Manufacturing Difficulty Level: 2 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 12 THE PROCESSES, PATTERNS, AND FUNCTIONS OF HUMAN SETTLEMENT
  • Text Reference: Key Issue 4 … Outsourcing Difficulty Level: 3 Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 3 HOW TO ANALYZE THE SPATIAL ORGANIZATION OF PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 11 THE PATTERNS AND NETWORKS OF ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE ON EARTH'S SURFACE GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 18 HOW TO APPLY GEOGRAPHY TO INTERPRET THE PRESENT AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE
  • Tcl 10e crs_ch11

    1. 1. The Cultural Landscape:An Introduction to Human Geography 10th EditionClassroom Response System Questions Chapter 11 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    2. 2. 11-01 Complete the following analogy concerningindustrial areas. The Mohawk Valley is to the UnitedStates as:C. the Central Industrial district is to the United States.D. Kuznetsk is to East Asia.E. Middle Atlantic is to United Kingdom.F. Silesia is to Eastern Europe.G. Volga is to Western Europe. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    3. 3. 11-01 Complete the following analogy concerningindustrial areas. The Mohawk Valley is to the UnitedStates as:• the Central Industrial district is to the United States.• Kuznetsk is to East Asia.• Middle Atlantic is to United Kingdom.• Silesia is to Eastern Europe.• Volga is to Western Europe.Explanation: Although industry is located worldwide, thefour major industrial regions account for the majority of theglobe’s manufacturing. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    4. 4. 11-02 Which of the following is an example of a siteconsideration when locating an industry?C. The industry in question is bulk-reducing.D. The manufacturing process is bulk-gaining.E. The product is perishable.F. The manufacturing process is labor intensive.G. The product will be shipped a long distance. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    5. 5. 11-02 Which of the following is an example of a siteconsideration when locating an industry?• The industry in question is bulk-reducing.• The manufacturing process is bulk-gaining.• The product is perishable.• The manufacturing process is labor intensive.• The product will be shipped a long distance.Explanation: The cost of the three main site factors—land,labor, and capital—vary among places. Globally, labor isthe most important site factor. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    6. 6. 11-03 Industrialization in the United States began in:C. the Midwest.D. New England.E. New York.F. Pennsylvania.G. the South. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    7. 7. 11-03 Industrialization in the United States began in:• the Midwest.• New England.• New York.• Pennsylvania.• the South.Explanation: Early New England factories producedtextiles for sale in Europe. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    8. 8. 11-04 Beer brewing is:C. a bulk-gaining industry.D. a bulk-reducing industry.E. a break-of-bulk industry.F. concentrated near mountain-fresh waters.G. unaffected by situation factors. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    9. 9. 11-04 Beer brewing is:• a bulk-gaining industry.• a bulk-reducing industry.• a break-of-bulk industry.• concentrated near mountain-fresh waters.• unaffected by situation factors.Explanation: Because their product becomes more bulkythrough manufacturing, breweries seek out locations nearmarkets. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    10. 10. 11-04 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    11. 11. 11-05 Which of the following statements about themanufacturing of cars in the United States is true?C. There are relatively few factories in the South.D. Each plant focuses on only one or a few models.E. Plants are located near each major metropolitan area.F. Factories are more dispersed now than they were in the 1950s.G. Factories locate near railroads and industrial canals to ship their products. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    12. 12. 11-05 Which of the following statements about themanufacturing of cars in the United States is true?• There are relatively few factories in the South.• Each plant focuses on only one or a few models.• Plants are located near each major metropolitan area.• Factories are more dispersed now than they were in the 1950s.• Factories locate near railroads and industrial canals to ship their products.Explanation: Auto manufacturers have clustered near thepopulation center of the country. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    13. 13. 11-05 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    14. 14. 11-06 The least expensive mode of transport for shippinggoods over long distances is by:C. airplane.D. automobile.E. rail.F. ship.G. truck. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    15. 15. 11-06 The least expensive mode of transport for shippinggoods over long distances is by:• airplane.• automobile.• rail.• ship.• truck.Explanation: Ship transport is the most cost effectivemode over long distances. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    16. 16. 11-07 Which type of manufacturing requires the lowestlevel of skill?C. airplanesD. automobilesE. computersF. consumer electronicsG. textiles © 2011 Pearson Education,
    17. 17. 11-07 Which type of manufacturing requires the lowestlevel of skill?• airplanes• automobiles• computers• consumer electronics• textilesExplanation: The textile industry is labor intensive. As aresult, a great emphasis is placed on finding low-cost labor. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    18. 18. 11-08 It is especially important for aluminum processors tolocate near:C. beverage manufacturers.D. cheap electricity.E. inexpensive labor.F. major metropolitan areas.G. navigable rivers. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    19. 19. 11-08 It is especially important for aluminum processors tolocate near:• beverage manufacturers.• cheap electricity.• inexpensive labor.• major metropolitan areas.• navigable rivers.Explanation: Reducing aluminum from bauxite orerequires large amounts of electricity. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    20. 20. 11-09 Within the United States, manufacturing has beenmost likely to shift in which of the following directions?C. North toward BostonD. Toward ChicagoE. East toward New York CityF. South toward HoustonG. Manufacturing has tended to stay in the Midwest and Northeast. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    21. 21. 11-09 Within the United States, manufacturing has beenmost likely to shift in which of the following directions?• North toward Boston• Toward Chicago• East toward New York City• South toward Houston• Manufacturing has tended to stay in the Midwest and Northeast.Explanation: Anti-union laws and federally fundedinfrastructure have enticed industry to move south. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    22. 22. 11-09 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    23. 23. 11-10 Outsourcing:C. is one aspect of vertical integration.D. is at the core of Fordist mass production.E. leads to an increase in manufacturing jobs in less developed countries.F. is part of a just-in-time production strategy.G. relies upon securing highly skilled labor. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    24. 24. 11-10 Outsourcing:• is one aspect of vertical integration.• is at the core of Fordist mass production.• leads to an increase in manufacturing jobs in less developed countries.• is part of a just-in-time production strategy.• relies upon securing highly skilled labor.Explanation: Outsourcing is a key part of the newinternational division of labor. © 2011 Pearson Education,

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