Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Chapter 4 review
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Chapter 4 review

579

Published on

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
579
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Text Reference: Introduction to Ch 4
    Difficulty Level: 3
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard: GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Text Reference: Introduction, Ch 4
    Difficulty Level: 2
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Text Reference: Diffusion of Folk and Popular Culture
    Difficulty Level: 2
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 6HOW CULTURE AND EXPERIENCE INFLUENCE PEOPLE'S PERCEPTIONS OF PLACES AND REGIONSGEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Text Reference: Introduction to Ch 4
    Difficulty Level: 3
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Text Reference: Popular Housing Styles
    Difficulty Level: 4
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Text Reference: Food Attractions and Taboos
    Difficulty Level: 3
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Text Reference: Popular Food Customs
    Difficulty Level: 2
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Text Reference: Popular Food Customs
    Difficulty Level: 3
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Text Reference: Diffusion of the Internet and Figure 4-15
    Difficulty Level: 3
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICSGEOGRAPHY STANDARD 18HOW TO APPLY GEOGRAPHY TO INTERPRET THE PRESENT AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE
  • Text Reference: Diffusion of Popular Housing, Clothing and Food
    Difficulty Level: 2
    Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge
    U.S. Geography Standard:
    GEOGRAPHY STANDARD 10THE CHARACTERISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPLEXITY OF EARTH'S CULTURAL MOSAICS
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Cultural Landscape: An Introduction to Human Geography 10th Edition Classroom Response System Questions Chapter 4 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 2. 04-01 “Everyday, without fail, I make time to call my father on the phone.” This statement from an individual indicates a(n) A. B. C. D. cultural characteristic. habit. custom. trait. E. annoyance. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 3. 04-01 “Everyday, without fail, I make time to call my father on the phone.” This statement from an individual indicates a(n) A. B. C. D. E. cultural characteristic. habit. custom. trait. annoyance. Explanation: Recurring individual behaviors are classified as habits while recurring group actions are called “customs.” © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 4. 04-02 Popular culture is practiced A. B. C. D. E. only where folk culture is absent. by large heterogeneous groups. by individuals only. only in the more developed countries. at specific places. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 5. 04-02 Popular culture is practiced A. B. C. D. E. only where folk culture is absent. by large heterogeneous groups. by individuals only. only in the more developed countries. at specific places. Explanation: Popular culture is closely associated with urban, industrial society. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 6. 04-03 Folk culture is most likely to spread by A. B. C. D. E. hierarchical diffusion. contagious diffusion. stimulus diffusion. copycat diffusion. relocation diffusion. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 7. 04-03 Folk culture is most likely to spread by A. B. C. D. E. hierarchical diffusion. contagious diffusion. stimulus diffusion. copycat diffusion. relocation diffusion. Explanation: While popular culture spreads quickly via hierarchical diffusion, folk culture spreads slowly via migration. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 8. 04-04 Complete the following analogy: Habit is to custom as A. B. C. D. E. diffusion is to region. individual is to group. folk is to popular. place is to space. form is to function. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 9. 04-04 Complete the following analogy: Habit is to custom as A. B. C. D. E. diffusion is to region. individual is to group. folk is to popular. place is to space. form is to function. Explanation: Individuals possess habits; groups are characterized by customs. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 10. 04-05 Complete the following analogy: Split-level is to Neo-colonial as A. B. C. D. E. “great room” is to living room. mansard is to family room. folk is to popular. half-timbered is to low-pitch roof. modern is to neo-eclectic. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 11. 04-05 Complete the following analogy: Split-level is to Neo-colonial as A. B. C. D. E. “great room” is to living room. mansard is to family room. folk is to popular. half-timbered is to low-pitch roof. modern is to neo-eclectic. Explanation: The split level is an example of a modern style and the Neo-colonial is neo-eclectic. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 12. 04-06 Globally, the lack of hog production in North Africa and Southwest Asia corresponds most closely to the spatial distribution of A. B. C. D. E. animism. capitalism. Christianity. Hinduism. Islam. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 13. 04-06 Globally, the lack of hog production in North Africa and Southwest Asia corresponds most closely to the spatial distribution of A. B. C. D. E. animism. capitalism. Christianity. Hinduism. Islam. Explanation: The prohibition on the consumption of pork makes hog production very small among Muslims. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 14. 04-06 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 15. 04-07 Wine production typically requires all of the following, except A. B. C. D. E. well-drained soils. supportive customs. proximity to water. cool summers. cool winters. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 16. 04-07 Wine production typically requires all of the following, except A. B. C. D. E. well-drained soils. supportive customs. proximity to water. cool summers. cool winters. Explanation: The production and consumption of wine relies on both a supportive culture and environment. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 17. 04-07 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 18. 04-08 Complete the following analogy: Bourbon whiskey is to the Upper South as A. B. C. D. E. tea is to the Northwest. rum is to Midwest. tequila is to the Southwest. vodka is to the Southeast. gin is to the Northeast. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 19. 04-08 Complete the following analogy: Bourbon whiskey is to the Upper South as A. B. C. D. E. tea is to the Northwest. rum is to Midwest. tequila is to the Southwest. vodka is to the Southeast. gin is to the Northeast. Explanation: While high income and advertising account for the consumption of alcohol in MDCs, some regional differences exist. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 20. 04-08 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 21. 04-09 In Europe, Internet usage was first concentrated in A. B. C. D. E. Albania. Belgium. Finland. France. Germany. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 22. 04-09 In Europe, Internet usage was first concentrated in A. B. C. D. E. Albania. Belgium. Finland. France. Germany. Explanation: In 1995, the highest concentration of Internet users in Europe were found in Finland. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 23. 04-09 © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 24. 04-10 The presence of similar restaurants, gas stations, and stores throughout the United States A. illustrate how popular culture can create a uniform landscape. B. show how folk culture can diffuse. C. are a prime example of regionalization. D. increase cultural awareness. E. None of the above is correct. © 2011 Pearson Education,
    • 25. 04-10 The presence of similar restaurants, gas stations, and stores throughout the United States A. illustrate how popular culture can create a uniform landscape. B. show how folk culture can diffuse. C. are a prime example of regionalization. D. increase cultural awareness. E. None of the above is correct. Explanation: While some regional differences persist, the spread of popular culture in MDCs is far reaching. © 2011 Pearson Education,

    ×