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WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album
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WNR.sg - Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album

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Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album …

Indian Memory Project: Looking at India's Photo Album

By Ms Anusha S Yadav
Founder, Indian Memory Project

Published in: Education
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  • 1. An average Indian’s understanding of regions other than their own
  • 2. 2008 Started as a facebook group in order to collect wedding photographs for a coffee table book proposal 2010 Feb. Re-instated most images as INDIAN MEMORY PROJECT 2010 Oct 62 images, 29,750 visitors as of yesterday
  • 3. Spreading the word Google Search --- > Wordpress Keywords Facebook channels Twitter Channels Email signatures Blog links Covered in almost all publications of India as well as in the leading publications of the Gulf and the UK Promoting online subscriptions
  • 4. CRITERIA Sender must be guardian/owner of the image Images only before the year 1990. (for now) Year and Place where image was clicked Connection to the people or space in image Details about the space or people in the image, and what you remember of it. Why was the picture taken? Any one else who would know more about the image?
  • 5. My grandfather, Balwant Goindi, a Sikh and my grandmother Ram Pyari, a Hindu were married in 1923. She was re-named Mohinder Kaur after her marriage. They went on to have 8 daughters and 2 sons, one of the daughters is my mother. Balwant Goindi owned a whiskey shop in Lahore. (now Pakistan). He was a very wealthy man and owned a Rolls Royce, which is like owning a jet these days. During Partition, he and his family were forced to come to Delhi, India, without any of his precious belongings; assuming he would return after the situation had calmed down. However, that never happened. Later, he heard that his bungalow and the shops were burnt down. Dinesh Khanna
  • 6. My grandparents, Mr. & Mrs. H.E Chowfin on their wedding day Dec 28, 1938 in Lahore. My grandfather Mr. Chowfin was part Chinese and part Indian and my grandmother was Afghani. The bride’s family forgot to mention his being part chinese to the receiving party of Afghani Pathans, at the station. When the Pathans from the bride's family went to receive the groom, they returned empty handed claiming that the grooms family had never arrived, they did mention though, that there were many strange chinese people hanging about at the station. Madhupriya Chaudhari Sinha
  • 7. 1932
  • 8. My Grandfather was a very progressive man. Though he married my grandmother very young, 17 or 18 I think, he decided not to have children until she was in her 20s. As he understood that she was too young to have kids so early. While married he went to study Chemistry in Manchester. I am told, he missed his boat to the UK at Bombay port, so he took the next one, hiding in a container. When he returned he and 2 other professors joined hands and founded the Surat University in Gujarat. The watch that my grandmother proudly wears in this photograph, was a gift he bought for her in Manchester. Manjiri Rajopadhye
  • 9. 1900
  • 10. My maternal grandfather, Narasinhbhai was a revolutionary man. Records of British India describe him as the ‘most dangerous man in Bombay Presidency’. He was exiled from British India for writing proscribed books. Though the Maharaja of Baroda clandestinely supported him. After completing his exile term in Germany and East Africa, C.F. Andrews persuaded him to join Rabindranath Tagore in Shantiniketan . He taught German there for a short time and then returned to his native town, Kheda in Gujarat to support Gandhiji’s Salt Satyagraha and mobilise people for the same . He became a leader in the district. Standing behind him, first from left is his grandson Dr. Shantibhai Patel who also actively participated in the freedom struggle and later became a successful scientist. Narsinhbhai’s daughter, Shanta Patel (my mother), sits, first from right with my father G.P.Patel, standing behind her. My father, G.P Patel supported my grandfather’s views, work and philosophy. They all were followers of Gandhiji. Sandhya Mehta
  • 11. This picture was taken at a fair in Surat, Gujarat. It was supposed to be only a close family photograph, however, some of our family friends’ and their families joined in and this picture was clicked. I remember it used to be one of the only places where families, who couldn’t afford a camera could get a picture taken. Most of these people you see in the Photograph, all of whom are of the last name ‘Patel’, migrated to USA and New Zealand, including my family. I was around three or four years old in the picture (top left, as a baby). Almost all of the Patels in the picture now own and run businesses like Pizza Parlours, Liquor Stores, Motels, Hotels or work in the IT industry. My parents and I too live in Rockdale, Texas, USA and run a hotel called Rockdale Inn.
  • 12. I was born in this house in 1923 and we lived there until 1941. My uncle was a barrister, then a Solicitor, (Partner in Payne and Co. Solicitors), and still later, High Court Receiver. The most distinguished Barrister at the High Court in Bombay, Inverarity , was my uncle’s friend, and often spent days in this house. At one stage he is said to have suffered losses in investment and I heard that he made a bonfire in my uncle’s garden of his investment certificates. If I am not mistaken he died while I was an infant. Whether he died in Scotland or in India, I am not sure. 50 or 60 years ago, this bungalow, which stands behind the Taj Hotel in Bandra, along with 8000 sq. yds. of land and a cottage on an elevated part was sold for Rs. 3 lakhs, without the furniture, which had been imported from Vienna. A lot of the furniture was then bought by Maharani Chimnabai Gaekwad of Baroda sometime in the early 1940s. The old bungalow was purchased by the Priests of the Order of Pilar and now houses the Father Agnel Ashram. There is a Church within it, and on the land are many educational institutions. Feroza H Seervai
  • 13. Cottari Kanakaiya Nayudu, or C.K. Nayudu, as he is better known, was born in Nagpur in October 1895. He made his debut in first class cricket in 1916, playing for the Hindus against the Europeans. He played cricket regularly until 1958, and then returned to the game for one last time in 1963 at the age of 68. He moved to Indore in 1923, on the invitation of Maharaja Holkar and would transform the Holkar team into one that would win many Ranji trophies. Nayudu was the first captain of the Indian cricket team to play England in 1932. His playing career spanned six decades. This picture was found in an old family album belonging to my uncle, Madhukar Dravid. My great- uncles Vasant Dravid and Narayan Dravid were great friends of Nayudu and his brother C.S. Nayudu. This picture was taken by my great-uncle, Late Vasant Dravid who is some manner also related to Rahul Dravid. The year the photograph was taken is not known, but my uncle puts it around 1940. Geetali Tare
  • 14. Here, Shanta Bhandarkar, my mother in law, is photographed as a baby with her English Mother Louisa Bishop, and father Dr Vasudev Sukhtankar (turban) and her uncle. Bombay, in 1910. Shanta Bhandarkar, my Mother in Law, turned 100 on February 25, 2010. On the occasion of her birthday our family gifted her an album with a collection of these old photographs, one of which is this image. Her father became the Director of Education, Indore State, 1926. ‘Ajoba’ as we called him, was a PhD in Sanskrit and Philosophy from Germany and also a staunch Brahmo Samaji (followers of one god with no form). Shanta doesn’t have very good short term memory, but her long term memory is sharp. She remembers details like her mother’s Christmas Pudding and the cakes that they used to bake. She studied at Sommerville, Oxford , UK and has travelled the world extensively. Usha Bhandarkar
  • 15. My mother Anupa Jacob (right) and her closest friend Shalini studied at the Convent of Jesus & Mary in Delhi. They were 15 years old here. My mother was a Rajasthani, from a small town of Nasirabad. Her father was orphaned when a plague hit the village. He along with many others were then adopted by the British. Everyone adopted was converted to Christianity and given the last name ‘Nathaniel’. From Nathu Singh, my grandfather became Fazal Masih Nathaniel. He went on to become the Head of the English Language Department at well known Mayo College, Ajmer. My mother married my father Philip Jacob, in 1968. He is a Syrian Christian - whom she met while she was studying at school, he was studying at St. Columba’s School. One of the most interesting parts of my mother’s life was that Shalini, some other friends and she, formed the first ever Delhi University‘s Girl Rock Band called “Mad Hatter” in their 1st year of college at Miranda House, Delhi. My mother was the lead guitarist and singer. Because of that status, when the Beatles performed in Delhi in 1966, the Mad Hatters were given front seats priority. My mother had 4 kids. She was also a piano teacher. My youngest sister Arunima is autistic but learnt music from my mother, she is an ace piano player and has performed Beethoven Music pieces with complete accuracy. My mother suffered a cardiac arrest in 1982, and passed away in 1986. Shalini Gupta, my mother’s friend in the photograph (left) is now a psychologist in London.
  • 16. indianmemoryproject.wordpress.com

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