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Haiku ems week 28 42 min with bellringer, activity, quiz, and prompt
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  • This slide should be on the screen during class transition. Students are expected to come in, sit down, and get started on the bellringer. When the bell rings, the teacher collects the bellringer work, it gets graded and forms part of the student’s daily grade. It is critical to grade everything so as to provide additional motivation for students to attempt the work.
  • This slide provides a background for the teacher to greet students and start the session. Typically I’ll say something like “Okay, happy Tuesday, everyone. I’ve got some great stuff for you today,” and click to the next slide.
  • This slide is the first of six that are clicked through very quickly to build an expectation in the student’s mind of what my goals for them are for the session. I find that it helps if students have some idea of what to expect. I do a set of slides like this each and every day, and so they come to understand how this overview can help them to know what the expectations are. This is where I start circulating in the room, holding my wireless slide clicker in my hand and clicking through as I read the slides.
  • Circulating in the room, I read these words and click to the next slide, monitoring for potential problems.
  • Circulating in the room, I read these words and click to the next slide, monitoring for potential problems.
  • Circulating in the room, I read these words and click to the next slide, monitoring for potential problems.
  • Circulating in the room, I read these words and click to the next slide, monitoring for potential problems.
  • Circulating in the room, I read these words and click to the next slide, monitoring for potential problems.
  • This is the first content slide. While circulating in the classroom, I click through the content slides, reading the material and expanding on it as I think necessary and providing time for students to write the material down, if they care to, monitoring for problems and taking action to keep students engaged.
  • I continue through the content slides, circulating in the classroom and reading the material,expanding on it as I think necessary and providing time for students to write the material down, if they care to, monitoring for problems and taking action to keep students engaged.
  • I continue through the content slides, circulating in the classroom and reading the material, expanding on it as I think necessary and providing time for students to write the material down, if they care to, monitoring for problems and taking action to keep students engaged.
  • I continue through the content slides, circulating in the classroom and reading the material, expanding on it as I think necessary and providing time for students to write the material down, if they care to, monitoring for problems and taking action to keep students engaged.
  • This is the last content slide for now. The last bullet provides a smooth way to transition to the next phase in the lesson, which is to look at a couple of haiku together.
  • This part is just for fun, I try to do a little something for fun each session, if the students’ behavior will allow for it.
  • This part is just for fun, I try to do a little something for fun each session, if the students’ behavior will allow for it.
  • Here’s the first sample haiku. I provide a few moments for students to read it, then I move straight to the next slides, which lead the students through an analysis to verify that it meets the requirements of a traditional haiku.
  • This is the first of several slides to verify that this sample meets the requirements of a traditional haiku. At this point, I say something like “First, a traditional haiku has three lines. Does this piece have three lines?” Then I click to the next slide, which answers that question.
  • I say “Yep. Three lines. One, two three.”
  • Then I say “Does this first line have 5 syllables?” I allow a few moments for students to count them out—some will make an attempt to do so. Then I confirm that it does have 5 syllables.
  • “Does this line have seven syllables?” I allow time for students to count them out, and then confirm that it does have seven syllables.
  • “Does this line have five syllables?” I allow time for students to count them out, then confirm.
  • “Looks pretty good so far. Now, is there a word here that suggests nature?”
  • “Yes, there are several, which you see here.”
  • “Okay, so this is a good traditional haiku. It’s got three lines, 17 syllables total in a five-seven-five pattern, and it has a word that suggests nature. In fact, as we saw, this one has several words that suggest nature. Good!”
  • This is a little bit I threw in to add interest to the discussion. At this point, I’d simply read the words and click to the next slide.
  • “Here’s a map of a part of the world. Japan is in red here, as you can see.”
  • “The United States is way over here on this picture.”
  • I added this portion as an activity—students learn to write the word haiku in Japanese. At this point, I simply read the words on the slide, then click to the next slide.
  • “This part here means ‘hai’...” and click.
  • “...this part means –ku.” Click to next slide.
  • “Put them together, and you get haiku.
  • “Let’s try to write this word together. It’s in Japanese, so we have to write it in a particular way. Let me show you how.”
  • “First, we write this part.” Click.
  • “This is how you do it. First draw a little line there, and second, draw a little line there.” Click.
  • “Then we write the second part here...” Click.
  • “...by drawing a line here, like that,...” Click.
  • “...and then drawing these little lines here.” Click.
  • “Then we write this part the same way, a line straight down first, then the three little lines as you see here.” Click.
  • “You’ve written the first part. Good.” Click.
  • “Now let’s do the second part together.” Click.
  • “Start by drawing this part first...” Click.
  • “...then we do this next part all as one stroke, across, curve down, and then jag up a little bit at the end, just as you see here.” Click.
  • “This next part is also done all in one stroke, down and then over to the right a little bit.” Click.
  • “Finish it up by squaring it off, and you’re done!” Click.
  • “That’s how you write the word haiku in Japanese. Now you try it a couple of times.” This slide begins the activity practice phase; the timer bar proceeds automatically to give the students a five-minute interval in a graphically understandable way (the blocks fill up as the time proceeds). During this time, I circulate in the room, monitoring behavior, providing assistance, and so forth. When the five minutes is over, the slide automatically moves forward to the next slide.
  • This slide is provided for a review of the content after the activity is completed. This is the first of two reviews that are built into the session. I simply read the words from the screen quickly and then ask for questions, answering them if there are any.
  • Now we transition to the practice portion, where students write a haiku of their own.
  • I simply read these words, then click to the next slide.
  • I simply read these words, then click to the next slide.
  • Again, a timing bar is used to provide an interval for composition. During this time, I circulate in the room, monitoring and assisting as necessary. When the time is over, the slide transitions automatically.
  • “Okay who wants to share their haiku?” If volunteers, then I let them read and lead the group in a quick analysis of the poem to see if the syllable count is right and whether or not there is a nature word. I’ll do two or three, depending on whether there are volunteers and whether they class can control themselves long enough to permit it.
  • “Here’s an haiku I came up with.” I present my haiku, and lead students through a count analysis of it.
  • This slide begins the second review of the content, a phase I call “minimum takeaways.” I use that phrase everyday, so students come to understand that it is the minimum material they need to know to proceed and to be a well-educated adult. I’m careful not to say that this is what they need to know to do well on the test—I lean away from any suggestion that the test is the point of the learning. If students ask me about that, I say “We test the content. If you know the content, you’ll naturally do well on the test.”
  • I read this and click to the next slide.
  • I read this and click to the next slide.
  • I read this and click to the next slide.
  • I read this and click to the next slide.
  • At this point, I ask if there are any questions, answering them, and then we transition to the quiz phase of the session.
  • The quiz is self-operating; after this transition slide, each question has a timing bar. When the time is over, the slides transition automatically. This frees me up—or whomever might be delivering this material—to circulate in the classroom, monitoring behavior, preventing problems, and making sure everyone is engaged and productive. Students use a standard answer sheet that has a spot for their name, for the quiz number, and they fill that now while this slide is on. When the teacher is ready, he or she click once from this slide to start the quiz, which operates automatically from this point.
  • First question. We see the timing bar, which provides 15 seconds for this question. Students read the question and select an answer, marking on their answer sheets. It is critically important not to stop the slides, even if students complain that it goes too fast. The time is set to their reading speed, plus a little for dwell time—and fast enough to reduce the opportunity for cheating or behavior problems. My line to respond to “too fast!” complaints is “We’re not going back. If you miss one, that’s okay, just keep going.” The pressure helps students adjust to testing situations later, when the stakes will be much higher.
  • If students participated in the “write haiku in Japanese” activity, they can easily answer this question. If they did not, then they probably can’t. This demonstrates to the students the value of participating in the activities and so maybe they’ll chose to do so in the future.
  • Many teachers believe that a multiple-choice question cannot assess analytical ability—this is not the case. In this question, students must analyze the syllable count in order to select the correct answer.
  • This task requires composition, so additional time is provided for that.
  • I collect the answer sheets immediately so as to reduce the opportunity for cheating.
  • This is the last slide of the presentation; students work on this until the bell rings, placing their responses in a box for that purpose near the exit, and the session is completed.

Transcript

  • 1. Bellringer Come in, sit down, and get started. Please do not make me tell you what to do! Thank you. Shrill late-night chirping Awakening messages News is sometimes bad. Write 35 words about this little poem.
  • 2. Mr. Bartlett’s English Class
  • 3. What are We Doing Today?
  • 4. What are We Doing Today? We will learn about a little poem form called haiku
  • 5. What are We Doing Today? We will learn about a little poem form called haiku We will read some haiku together
  • 6. What are We Doing Today? We will learn about a little poem form called haiku We will read some haiku together You will write a haiku of your own!
  • 7. What are We Doing Today? We will learn about a little poem form called haiku We will read some haiku together You will write a haiku of your own!  You’ll take a 10-question quiz for daily grade
  • 8. What are We Doing Today? We will learn about a little poem form called haiku We will read some haiku together You will write a haiku of your own!  You’ll take a 10-question quiz for daily grade  You’ll write 200 words in response to a prompt
  • 9. What is a Haiku? A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem
  • 10. What is a Haiku? A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)…
  • 11. What is a Haiku? A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)… Often includes a word suggesting nature…
  • 12. What is a Haiku? A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)… Often includes a word suggesting nature… The word “haiku” means “verse” in Japanese
  • 13. What is a Haiku? A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)… Often includes a word suggesting nature… The word “haiku” means “verse” in Japanese Let’s look at a haiku together!
  • 14. But just for today… When I say haiku, you say…
  • 15. But just for today… When I say haiku, you say… bless you!
  • 16. Untitled, by Andrea Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Birds fly everywhere.
  • 17. Untitled, by Andrea Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Birds fly everywhere. Three lines?
  • 18. Untitled, by Andrea Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Birds fly everywhere. Three lines?
  • 19. Untitled, by Andrea First line: 5 syllables? Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Birds fly everywhere.
  • 20. Untitled, by Andrea Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Birds fly everywhere. Second line: 7 syllables?
  • 21. Untitled, by Andrea Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Third line: 5 syllables? Birds fly everywhere.
  • 22. Untitled, by Andrea Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Birds fly everywhere. Is there a word that suggests nature?
  • 23. Untitled, by Andrea Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Birds fly everywhere. Is there a word that suggests nature?
  • 24. Untitled, by Andrea Springtime comes at last Bees drink the juice from flowers Birds fly everywhere.
  • 25. Haiku originated in Japan.
  • 26. Haiku originated in Japan.
  • 27. Haiku originated in Japan.
  • 28. This is the Japanese word for haiku.
  • 29. This is the Japanese word for haiku. This part means hai—
  • 30. This is the Japanese word for haiku. This part means hai— …and this part means –ku.
  • 31. This is the Japanese word for haiku. This part means hai— …and this part means –ku. Put them together, and you get haiku.
  • 32. Let’s try to write this together.
  • 33. First, write this part...
  • 34. 1 2 First, write this part...
  • 35. First, write this part… then write this part…
  • 36. 3 First, write this part… then write this part…
  • 37. 4 5 6 3 First, write this part… then write this part…
  • 38. 7 8 9 10 First, write this part… then write this part… then write this part.
  • 39. Good. That’s hai—.
  • 40. Good. That’s hai—. Now let’s do –ku.
  • 41. Write this part… 1
  • 42. 2 Write this part… Then write this part all in a single stroke.
  • 43. Then write this part as one stroke… 3
  • 44. Then write this part as one stroke… and this finishes it up! 4
  • 45. 1 3 4 10 6 1 2 4 3 8 9 5 2 7 Haiku! Practice writing it a couple of times… 5 min
  • 46. Let’s Review Haiku A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)… Often includes a word suggesting nature… The word “haiku” means “verse” in Japanese
  • 47. Now You Write a Haiku Poem!
  • 48. Now You Write a Haiku Poem! Looking for 3 lines of 17 syllables…
  • 49. Now You Write a Haiku Poem! Looking for 3 lines of 17 syllables… Looking for a word suggesting nature…
  • 50. Now You Write a Haiku Poem! Looking for 3 lines of 17 syllables… Looking for a word suggesting nature… Let’s take 5 minutes to compose a haiku 5 min
  • 51. Let’s hear your haiku! Any volunteers...?
  • 52. Here’s My Haiku A cold winter’s day And outside in my backyard Three squirrels run away.
  • 53. Minimum Takeaways for Today
  • 54. Minimum Takeaways for Today A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem
  • 55. Minimum Takeaways for Today A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)…
  • 56. Minimum Takeaways for Today A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)… Often includes a word suggesting nature…
  • 57. Minimum Takeaways for Today A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)… Often includes a word suggesting nature… The word “haiku” means “verse” in Japanese
  • 58. Minimum Takeaways for Today A haiku is a way of writing a very short poem Has 3 lines of 17 syllables (usually 5, 7, 5)… Often includes a word suggesting nature… The word “haiku” means “verse” in Japanese Now let’s take a short quiz.
  • 59. Short Quiz on Haiku 10 Questions Quiz 15342
  • 60. 15 Question 1: What does the word haiku mean in Japanese? (a) poem (b) verse (c) syllable (d) song (e) sneeze
  • 61. 15 Question 2: Traditionally, a haiku has ___ syllables in the first line. (a) 5 (b) 7 (c) 8 (d) 17 (e) 28
  • 62. 15 Question 3: How many lines does a haiku traditionally have? (a) 3 (b) 5 (c) 7 (d) 17 (e) 19
  • 63. 18 Question 4: A haiku often includes a ___ word. (a) color (b) nature (c) compound (d) foreign (e) complex
  • 64. 15 Question 5: Traditionally, a haiku has ___ syllables in the second line. (a) 5 (b) 7 (c) 8 (d) 17 (e) 28
  • 65. 21 Question 6: Which one of these is the Japanese word for haiku? (a) (b) (c) (d)
  • 66. 30 Late autumn moonlight A small worm silently digs … Question 7: Which line would best complete this haiku? (a) Up a fossil. (b) A hole to spend the winter in. (c) Into a pine cone. (d) Until it finds buried treasure.
  • 67. 30 Green and speckled legs … Splash in cool water. Question 8: Which line would be best for the middle of this haiku? (a) Show more than they ought to. (b) Hop on logs and lily pads. (c) Moving up and down. (d) Warts upon the back.
  • 68. 30 … I watch a leaf settle down In a bed of brown Question 9: Which line would best start this haiku? (a) From a tree growing around (b) Falling to the ground (c) Where I am bound (d) Across the ground runs a hound
  • 69. 6 min Question 10: Write a traditional haiku on the back of your answer sheet.
  • 70. Good. Pass your answer sheets forward now, please. Then get out a fresh sheet of paper.
  • 71. You buy a bracelet at a flea market. When you put it on, you discover that when you touch someone, you can hear their thoughts? What do you do? Write 200 words. 20 min
  • 72. Mr. Bartlett’s English Class Thanks for your cooperation, and I’ll see you next time.