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5.01  Activity Notes A 5.01 Activity Notes A Document Transcript

  • 5.01 Student Activities Notes • How is database information used, organized, and managed in business? For what purposes? Database Uses in Business I. Database Use and Purpose – A database is a tool used to organize, store, retrieve, and communicate groups of related information. A. Examples of databases and database uses in business and society: 1. phone book 2. online library card catalog 3. payroll data including employee names, social security numbers, pay rates, exemptions, etc. 4. eBay and other online businesses use databases to maintain inventory and keep track of customers, products, vendors, pay pal accounts B. Tables are the building blocks of all databases. They are used to group and organize the information within a database. 1. A table is an arrangement of columns and rows. It is the fundamental building block of all databases. 2. An entry is a single piece of data in a database table. 3. A field is a grouping or category of similar information contained in a table; a unique identifier for a category of information 4. A record is a complete description of all of the fields related to one item in a table. II. Data Types, Field Properties, Primary Keys, and Printing A. Before a database can be built, the user must first define its purpose and determine how the data will be organized into fields. 1. Fields should be formatted in accordance with the data they contain so that the database can be searched, used in calculations, and sorted as needed. 2. A field name should be short and descriptive 3. A data type defines the value of a cell and a field property defines the format of the data within the cell B. Data types: used to control how data in a particular field will be searched, sorted, or used in calculations. The default format is text.
  • 5.01 Student Activities Notes 1. Text – used for data that will be sorted in alphabetical order or listed randomly, but will not be used in mathematical calculations. 2. Memo – a data type used for lengthy entries that allows combinations of text and numbers 3. Number – used for data that may be calculated, sorted, or filtered. 4. Date/time – data type used to arrange and sort data chronologically, often used with the input mask field property 5. Currency – data type used to format numbers as decimal values with a dollar sign. The default format for currency is two decimal places. 6. Auto Number – used to automatically assign a number to each record and to assist in preventing duplication of data. 7. Yes/No – a data type in toggle format that allows a user to select a yes or no value in a database cell. The default setting is No. 8. Lookup Wizard – a data type used to define preset values for database entries. This feature increases productivity and accuracy by reducing the amount of data entry required. C. Field properties – used to control how data is entered in a field 1. Field size – used to control the size of the field, measured in characters 2. Format – used to control the layout of the field, such as one or two decimal places 3. Input Mask – a template-like field property that regulates how data is entered in a cell. For example, if the phone number input mask is used, the user will be prompted to input data in a specific format, such as (919) 555-5555. 4. Caption – a field property used for column naming that allows a more user-friendly and properly formatted field name than the field name stored in the database design D. Editing and Printing – Procedures to add and delete records and fields, edit field names, rearrange fields in a database and print. III. Database Management – The effectiveness of a database can be measured by the user’s ability to retrieve useful information. • An effective database is one that contains timely information and thus requires continuous maintenance. o Consider the telephone directory and the amount of information that must be gathered, edited, and processed to provide customers with accurate information.
  • 5.01 Student Activities Notes • Many tools are available to assist in the retrieval, processing, and manipulation of database information. A. Filters allow for the retrieval of information that meets specific criteria. 1. Filter by Selection – filters for information related to an active cell 2. Filter/Advanced Filter Sort – used to define specific search criteria B. Sorts allow for information to be arranged in a specific order such as alphabetical, chronological, ascending, or descending. C. Database Relationship – a link between two or more tables in a database • The relationship is developed when common fields in the tables are linked, such as the Customer ID field in a Customer Address table and the Customer ID field in a Purchases table. • The relationship enhances the power of the database by allowing retrieval of data from multiple tables and eliminating the need for data duplication. 1. Types of Relationships a. One-to-Many is a type of relationship that occurs when a record in one table is linked to more than one record in another table. b. Many-to-Many relationships are formed by connecting two or more tables that have a one-to-many relationship. The connection is made by a Junction Table. 2. Relationship Components a. Primary Key – used to format each record in a database as a unique entity. Primary keys allow database tables to communicate. i. May be assigned to an existing field that contains information unique to each record. ii. May be assigned via an AutoNumber field that automatically assigns a unique number to each record. iii. The linked fields must be of the same data type and size b. Foreign key – when tables are linked by the primary key, the related field in the second table is known as the foreign key c. Junction table – a table used to join primary key fields from multiple tables
  • 5.01 Student Activities Notes d. Join line – a graphical representation of the link between two or more tables e. Referential integrity protects related data that is stored in multiple tables. Referential integrity would prevent a customer in a customers table from being deleted if the customer’s ID also appears in the order table IV. Raw Data Import - A useful and practical method for obtaining information from other sources and creating database tables. Eliminates the need for repetitive data entry and assists in the protection of the data’s integrity. A. Must be formatted as text B. Must be separated at field and record breaks with a separator, such as a comma (delimitated)
  • Database Fundamentals graphic organizer Student Activity Student Name Period Date DATABASE FUNDAMENTALS Directions: Record notes while viewing the Database Fundamentals Power Point Main Topic: Organization Definition: of a Database Business Uses of Databases Can you associate company names with the database examples? Telephone book: Customer data: ____________________ Student Data: Real estate listings: _________________ Music: Hospital/patient data: _______________ Fingerprints: Inventory: _________________________ Dictionaries: : ____________________ Four Database Objects: e ist th J ust l of 1. Queries, es nam bjects Forms, and the o don’t Reports will ; here about be discussed y worr tions 2. in 5.02 i defin yet. 3. Tables
  • Database Fundamentals graphic organizer Student Activity Student Name Period Date Tables: the Building Blocks of all Databases Record – Definition and Example Table Components Field – Definition and Example Entry – Definition and Example
  • Database Fundamentals graphic organizer Student Activity Student Name Period Date 1. What are the field names? 2. What is the name of the table? 3. How many records are there? 4. How many entries are there? 5. Describe the contents of one record. 6. Describe the contents of one field. 6411 – Computer Applications I Summer 2008, Version 2 Unit B – 5.01 – page 7
  • Guided Practice: Search an Online Database Teacher-Demonstration Student Name Period Date GUIDED PRACTICE: SEARCH AN ONLINE DATABASE Directions: You will search an online database of airlines. Go to www.expedia.com and search for 5 round-trip flights to 5 different destinations. Answer the questions at the end of the activity when you have completed the search. 1. Flight One Flight # Airline Departure City Arrival City Departure Time Arrival Time Length of Flight Date Leaving # of Stopovers Cost of Trip 2. Flight Two Flight # Airline Departure City Arrival City Departure Time Arrival Time Length of Flight Date Leaving # of Stopovers Cost of Trip 3. Flight Three Flight # Airline Departure City Arrival City Departure Time Arrival Time Length of Flight Date Leaving # of Stopovers Cost of Trip 6411 – Computer Applications I Summer 2008, Version 2 Unit B – 5.01 – page 8
  • Guided Practice: Search an Online Database Teacher-Demonstration Student Name Period Date 4. Flight Four Flight # Airline Departure City Arrival City Departure Time Arrival Time Length of Flight Date Leaving # of Stopovers Cost of Trip 5. Flight Five Flight # Airline Departure City Arrival City Departure Time Arrival Time Length of Flight Date Leaving # of Stopovers Cost of Trip Questions: 1. What are the field names? 2. What is the name of the database? 3. How many entries were recorded in your search? 4. How many records were searched? 6411 – Computer Applications I Summer 2008, Version 2 Unit B – 5.01 – page 9
  • Data Types and Field Properties graphic organizer Student Activity Student Name Period Date DATA TYPES AND FIELD PROPERTIES Directions: Record notes and answer the questions below while viewing the Data Types and Field Properties Power Point. 1. What is the function of a data type? 2. What is the function of a field property? 3. Why are data types important? 4. Critical thinking: If text is selected for the data type of a field and the field contains the birthdates of 50 employees, what will happen when the data is sorted? 5. What data types are available? Use the help feature of your software to briefly describe the purpose of each data type listed below. Hint: Select the first data type and press the F1 key Data Type Description Text Memo Number Date/time Currency
  • Data Types and Field Properties graphic organizer Student Activity Student Name Period Date Data Type Description AutoNumber Yes/No Lookup Wizard 6. When should you change from the default data type? 7. Why are field properties important? 8. What field properties are available? Click on each field property listed below and view the descriptions as they appear in the right-hand pane. Describe each. Field Property Description Field size Format Input mask Caption 9. When should you set a field property?
  • Data Types and Field Properties graphic organizer Student Activity Student Name Period Date 10. What are the steps for creating a database? 1). a. b. c. 2). 3). 4). a. b. 5).
  • Review of Database Tables Student Activity Student Name Period Date REVIEW OF DATABASE TABLES B A C Part I Directions: Match the letters above with their definition below. 1. Field ______ 3. Entry ______ 2. Record ______ Part II Directions: Answer the questions below using the above diagram. 1. Number of entries _________ 3. Number of fields _________ 2. Number of records _________ Part III Directions: Identify the correct data type for each item using the list below Text Number Date/Time Yes/No Currency Memo Lookup Wizard 1. 123-45-6789 (social security number) __________________ 2. John __________________ 3. $257.98 __________________ 4. 12587 (employee ID number) __________________ 5. Paid/Not Paid __________________ 6. This item needs to be reordered. It is one of our best selling items. __________________ 7. Series of choices (low, medium, high) __________________ 8. December 15, 2006 __________________
  • Review of Database Tables Student Activity Student Name Period Date 9. (555) 555-5555 (phone number) __________________ 10. Pets Allowed/Pets Not Allowed __________________ 11. Age of students __________________ 12. Cost of trip __________________ 13. Date of Purchase __________________ Part IV Directions: Place the parts of a database in order from the smallest unit to the largest unit. (1 being the smallest, 5 being the largest) • Field • Character • Entry • Record • Database 1. 3. 5. 2. 4. Part V: Match the definition to the correct term. A. Is also a true/false field. Will contain a 1. Field checkbox for yes no. Default is No. 2. Entry B. Monetary values C. Creates fields that automatically enter a unique 3. Record number when a record is added D. Includes words and/or numbers not used in 4. Text calculations E. This format is applied to a field that will be 5. Number sorted chronologically 6. Input Mask F. Data and formulas keyed in a field G. An efficient means of storing and retrieving data 7. Yes/No and printing reports from the stored data H. One item of information in a record. 8. Currency Represented by a column 9. Lookup Field I. A group of related fields of information 10. Memo J. A format often applied to dates and times 11. Database K. Like text, but max of 64,000 characters L. Allows you to create a finite set of choices for 12. AutoNumber that field’s entry values
  • Review of Database Tables Student Activity Student Name Period Date
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: Computers Teacher Demonstration Student Name: Period: Date: GUIDED PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: COMPUTERS Directions: In this activity, you will follow along with your teacher to create a database and complete the following tasks: • Plan the structure • Add records • Enter data • Delete records 1. Plan the structure a. How will the data be grouped? You will be creating a computer inventory database. For each item, you have the name of the manufacturer, the serial number of the equipment, the room location, and the ID number of the student to which each piece of equipment is assigned. b. What will the field names be? Record the field names in the first row of each column below: Compaq 12345 214 5 Dell 54321 110 6 Dell 98765 310 9 Packard Bell 45678 214 3 Compaq 34567 110 4 Compaq 95425 111 8 Gateway 55557 109 8 Dell 90864 222 12 Dell 123674 214 15 Gateway 87093 119 27 Hewlett Packard 83765 111 22 c. What will you name the database? 2. Open and save a new database Notes:
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: Computers Teacher Demonstration Student Name: Period: Date: 3. Create a table Notes: 4. Enter the field names a. Set data types. Unless the data will be used in a sort, search, or calculation, use the default settings. Think about how a user might search the database for information. Will the information be sorted by room number? Will the information be searched by student number? Notes: b. Set field properties if needed. Do you need to limit the size of any of the fields? Do any of the fields need to be represented as a decimal?  Use the caption field property to assign user-friendly names to each field Notes: 5. Enter the data using the table on the previous page.
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: Computers Teacher Demonstration Student Name: Period: Date: Edit the Database Table: 1. Edit the database to add the following records: Hewlett Packard 88334 109 25 Compaq 22990 211 26 Dell 34419 110 27 Gateway 22334455 214 28 2. Edit the database to delete the following 2 records: • Compaq with Serial Number 34567 • Dell with Serial Number 123674 Notes:
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: Computers Teacher Key GUIDED PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: COMPUTERS KEY Field Name Field Property Field Property (Field Size) (Caption) Manufacturer 20 Same SeNo 9 Serial Number RNo 4 Room Number StNo 4 Student Number Manufacturer Serial Number Room Number Student Number Compaq 12345 214 5 Dell 54321 110 6 Dell 98765 310 9 Packard Bell 45678 214 3 Compaq 34567 110 4 Compaq 95425 111 8 Gateway 55557 109 8 Dell 90864 222 12 Dell 123674 214 15 Gateway 87093 119 27 Hewlett Packard 83765 111 22
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: Computers Teacher Key 1. Edit the database by adding the following records: Manufacturer Serial Number Room Number Student Number Hewlett Packard 88334 109 25 Compaq 22990 211 26 Dell 34419 110 27 Gateway 22334455 214 28 2. Edit the database by deleting the following 2 records: Compaq with Serial Number 34567 Dell with Serial Number 123674 Computers Database With records deleted With records added
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: Scavenger Hunt Student Activity Student Name Period Date INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: SCAVENGER HUNT Directions: In this activity, you will work independently to create a database based on information you gather from your classmates. • You will need to determine field names and captions, data types, and field properties by reading the questions below. • Once you have determined the fields, you will survey your classmates as assigned by your teacher. • You will then create a database table to record your results. Steps in Creating a Database 1. Plan the structure of the database (sketch on paper) a) How will the data be grouped? b) What will the field names be? c) What will you name the database? 2. Open and save a new database 3. Create a table 4. Enter the field names a) Set the data types b) Set the field properties 5. Enter the data Survey Questions: 1. What is your first and last name? 2. Do you have blue eyes? 3. What is your favorite sport? 4. Do you have your driver’s license? 5. Are you a Senior, Junior, Sophomore or Freshman? 6. What is your favorite music group or band? 7. What is your favorite food? 8. What is your favorite color? 9. Are you left-handed or right-handed? 10. How old are you?
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: Scavenger Hunt Student Activity Student Name Period Date
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: Scavenger Hunt Teacher Key INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: SCAVENGER HUNT KEY Student answers will vary
  • Guided Practice: Database Management: Anti-Virus Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date GUIDED PRACTICE: DATABASE MANAGEMENT: ANTI-VIRUS Directions: In this activity, you will follow along with your teacher to complete the following tasks as you create a database of anti-virus software: • Determine data types and field properties • Add captions • Enter data • Add a field • Use AutoNumber • Delete a field • Print a table 1. Open the Anti-Virus_Student database that has been sent to you electronically by your teacher. 2. Save the database in your directory according to teacher directions 3. Open the Anti-Virus_Student database table 4. Add fields 1 and 3-6 (below) and set the data types and field properties. NA means to accept the default settings. Field Properties Field Decimal Format Caption Field Field Name Data Type Size Places 1. No AutoNumber NA NA NA NA 2. Software Title Memo NA NA NA Title 3. Price Currency Currency NA NA NA 4. Rating Number NA Decimal 2 NA 5. Compatibilit Text NA NA NA NA y 6. Size Text NA NA NA NA
  • Guided Practice: Database Management: Anti-Virus Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date 5. Enter the rest of the table data below: No Popular Anti-virus Software Titles Price Rating Compatibility Size .Mac 2.5 Retail $76.99 4.78 MAC 64 MB PC-Cillin 2003 $26.99 4.2 W93 264 MB Norton Anti-virus 2002 Professional 264 MB $39.54 4.17 MAC Upgrade Bullguard Anti-virus Firewall $39.99 4 MAC 264 MB Norton Personal Firewall 2005 $42.50 4 XP 1G Stomp Spy Ware X-terminator $22.79 3.83 XP 1G eTrust EZ Anti-virus 2005 $24.99 3.8 W95 264 MB Zone Alarm Internet Security Suite $59.99 3.6 W98 264 MB PC-Cillin Internet Security 2005 $39.99 3.55 W95 64 MB Webroot Spy Sweeper Internet 1G $54.99 3.67 XP Essentials Suite McAfee Anti-virus Suite $39.99 4.25 XP 1G Ad-Aware $59.99 4 XP 264 MB 6. Delete the Compatibility field Notes: 7. Print the table Notes: 8. Save and submit according to teacher directions.
  • Guided Practice: Database Management: Anti-Virus Teacher Key GUIDED PRACTICE: DATABASE MANAGEMENT: ANTI-VIRUS KEY
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: Survey Student Activity Student Name Period Date INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: SURVEY Directions: In this activity, you will work independently to edit a database of survey information as you complete the following tasks: • Set data types and field properties • Use AutoNumber • Enter data • Add a field • Add captions • Delete a field • • Print a table 1. Open the Survey_Student database that was sent to you electronically by your teacher and save it to your student directory 2. Add a field named No. in front of the Age field a. Set the data type to AutoNumber b. Set the caption to Number 3. Add a field named NoChdrn in front of the Status field a. Set the data type to Number b. Set the caption to Number of Children 4. Key the data for the added fields Number Marital Number Age Income Gender of Status Children 1 34 $25,000.00 M 2 S 2 45 $100,000.00 M 3 S 3 88 $50,000.00 M 1 S 4 25 $26,000.00 F 1 M 5 21 $39,000.00 M 0 M 6 58 $57,000.00 F 3 S 7 45 $37,000.00 M 3 M 8 46 $90,000.00 M 0 M 9 40 $58,000.00 F 2 S 10 36 $60,000.00 M 2 S 11 36 $72,000.00 F 2 M 12 66 $22,000.00 M 2 S
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: Survey Student Activity Student Name Period Date 5. Follow teacher directions for printing, completing the final step of this activity (deletion of a field), and submitting your work. Ask your teacher which field to delete. INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: SURVEY KEY Field Names Caption Field Type Field Size No Number AutoNumber NA Age Same Number Long Integer Income Same Currency 14 Gender Same Text 2 NoChdrn Number of Number Long Integer Children Status Marital Status Text NA Note: Students were instructed to delete the Marital Status field
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: MusicFun Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date GUIDED PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: MUSICFUN Directions: In this activity, you will follow along with your teacher to create a database and complete the following tasks: Apply field formats: • Add fields • Date with Input Mask • Rearrange fields • AutoNumber (review) • Add entries • Lookup • • Yes/No 1. Open the MusicFun_Student database that has been sent to you electronically by your teacher. 2. Follow teacher instructions for saving the database in your student directory. 3. Add a field named MusicianID in front of the CD/Album Title field and set the data type to AutoNumber 4. Add another field named Genre after MusicianID (and in front of CD/Album Title) a. Set the data type to Lookup and follow teacher directions to enter the lookup values b. Key the following values for the lookup column: i. Pop ii. Classical iii. Country iv. R & B v. Reggae vi. Rock Notes:
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: MusicFun Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date 5. Add another field named Release after the Artist field a. Set the data type to Date/Time b. Set the caption to Release Date c. Set the field property for Input Mask and short date format Notes: 6. Add another field after Release a. Name the field Under 25 b. Set the data type to Yes/No c. Set the caption to Under 25? d. Note that the Format field property automatically selects Yes/No Notes:
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: MusicFun Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date 7. Before entering the data, notice how a drop down menu appears in the Genre column. How does this benefit efficiency and accuracy? 8. Notice that the Under 25? column contains boxes. The default value is No. To change the value to yes, click or depress the space bar. 9. Enter the remaining data below. When keying the date, enter a zero before any single digit numbers, such as 04/03/2008. Release Under MusicianID Genre Album Title Artist Date 25? How to Dismantle an 1 Rock U2 11/23/2004 No Atomic Bomb 2 Rock American Idiot Green Day 9/21/2004 No 3 R & B Genius Loves Company Ray Charles 8/31/2004 No 4 R & B Get Lifted John Legend 12/28/2004 No 5 Pop Maximum Alicia Keys Alicia Keys 12/14/2004 Yes Brooks and 6 Country Red Dirt Road 7/15/2003 No Dunn 7 R & B Purple Rain Prince 10/25/1990 No Doobie 8 Rock Minute by Minute 2/22/2002 No Brothers 9 Rock Songs About Jane Maroon 5 6/25/2002 No 10 Pop Breakaway Kelly Clarkson 11/30/2005 Yes 11 Rock It's Only Rock and Roll Rolling Stones 7/26/1974 No 12 Rock Made in the Shade Rolling Stones 4/5/1975 No 13 Rock Beggar's Banquete Rolling Stones 8/27/1968 No 14 Rock War U2 5/15/1983 No 15 Rock Achtung, Baby U2 11/19/1991 No Andrew Lloyd 16 Classical Phantom of the Opera 11/23/2004 No Weber The Essential Stevie Ray Stevie Ray 17 R & B Vaughan and Double 10/1/2002 No Vaughan Trouble
  • Guided Practice: Create a Database: MusicFun Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date Release Under MusicianID Genre Album Title Artist Date 25? Legend (The Definitive 18 Reggae Bob Marley 5/21/2002 No Remasters) Jessica 19 Country Who Am I? 2/27/2001 No Andrews 20 R & B Best of Bonnie Raitt (US) Bonnie Raitt 9/30/2003 No Wolfgang 21 Classical Requiem Amadeus No Mozart 22 Classical Crimson Tide Soundtrack Hans Zimmer 5/16/1995 No Gretchen 23 Country Here for the Party 5/11/2004 No Wilson 24 Country Greatest Hits Shania Twain 11/9/2004 No 25 R & B Confessions Usher 10/5/2004 Yes Dave Matthews 26 Pop Under the Table Dreaming 8/24/2004 No Band 10. Drag the Artist column in front of the Album Title column. 11. Save and print according to teacher directions.
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: B&B Student Activity Student Name Period Date INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: B&B Directions: In this activity, you will work independently to edit a database and complete the following tasks: Format data types and field properties: • Add fields • Date with Input Mask • Rearrange fields • AutoNumber (review) • Add entries • LookUp • • Yes/No Part I 1. Open the B&B_Student database that has been sent to you electronically by your teacher. Save the database in your student directory according to teacher directions. 2. Open the database table HistoricInns_Student 3. Insert a field named Children after No. Rooms a. Set the data type to Yes/No b. Set the caption to Allows Children? 4. Add a field named Setting after the City field a. Set the data type to Lookup b. Key the values Mountain and Town in the lookup column c. Set the caption to Mountain or Town? 5. Add a field named Breakfast after the Pets field a. Set the data type to Yes/No b. Set the caption to Breakfast? 6. Update the table by adding data to the new fields using the table below: No. Allows Mountain Historic Inn City Breakfast? Pets? Rooms Children? or Town? A Bed of Roses 5 No Yes Mountain No No Abbington Green 8 Yes Yes Mountain No Yes Albermarle Inn 11 No Yes Mountain Yes No Biltmore Village Inn 6 No Yes Mountain Yes Yes
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: B&B Student Activity Student Name Period Date No. Allows Mountain Historic Inn City Breakfast? Pets? Rooms Children? or Town? Blake House Inn 6 Yes Yes Mountain Yes Yes Carolina Bed & Breakfast 7 Yes Yes Mountain Yes Yes Cedar Crest Victorian Inn 12 No Yes Mountain Yes No Chestnut Street Inn 8 No Yes Mountain Yes No Colby House 5 Yes Yes Mountain Yes No Dry Ridge Inn 8 Yes Yes Mountain Yes No Inn on Main Street 7 No No Town Yes No Inn on Montford (1900) 5 Yes Yes Mountain Yes No North Lodge on Oakland 6 Yes Yes Mountain Yes No Owl's Nest Inn at Engadine 7 No No Town Yes Yes Secret Garden (1904) 3 No No Town Yes No The Hawk & Ivy 4 Yes No Town Yes No The Lion and the Rose 5 Yes Yes Mountain Yes No White Gate Inn and Cottage 6 Yes Yes Mountain Yes No (1889) 7. Move the Pets column behind the Breakfast column. Part II: Answer the following questions: 1. What is the default value of a Yes/No field? 2. How many records are in the database? 3. How many fields are in the database? 4. What advice would you give someone about assigning field names? 5. How could this database be used on the Internet?
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: B&B Student Activity Student Name Period Date
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: B&B Student Activity Student Name Period Date 6. How would users benefit from this list if posted on the Internet? 7. How would the owners of the B&Bs benefit from this list if posted on the Internet? 8. What other fields might be useful? 9. What are two ways to toggle the yes/no field when entering data? 10. Save and submit according to teacher instructions.
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: B&B Teacher Key INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: B&B KEY Answer the following questions: 1. What is the default value of a Yes/No field? No 2. How many records are in the database? 18 3. How many fields are in the database? 7 4. What advice would you give someone about assigning field names? • Field names should be short and directly related to the corresponding data. 5. How could this database be used on the Internet? • This database would be a great resource for travelers when planning a business trip or vacation. 6. How would users benefit from this list if posted on the Internet? • Internet users can quickly and easily compare the locations, availability, and amenities of the inns. 7. How would the owners of the B & Bs benefit from this list if posted on the Internet? • Owners would benefit from the potential sales associated with people searching for availability of inns. 8. What other fields might be useful? • Cost, smoking or non-smoking, bathrooms, pet fee, etc. 9. What are two ways to toggle the yes/no field when entering data? • Click the box to toggle a check mark for a Yes or a blank for No • Tab to the yes/no field and hit the space bar to toggle.
  • Independent Practice: Create a Database: B&B Teacher Key INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: CREATE A DATABASE: B&B KEY
  • Database Review Student Activity Student Name Period Date DATABASE REVIEW Part I Directions: Arrange the steps in creating a database in their proper order by placing a number by each item. Step Procedure Create a table Enter the data Enter the field names Open and save a new database Plan the structure of the database (sketch on paper) Set the data types Set the field properties Part II Directions: Select the appropriate data type or field property for the data listed below: Data Data Type/Field Property 1. Birth date A Currency 2. Children? B Input Mask 3. List of ice cream flavors C Lookup 4. List of pizza toppings D Number 5. Married? E Text 6. Net pay F Yes/No 7. Price 8. Street address 9. Telephone number 10. Zip code
  • Database Review Student Activity Student Name Period Date
  • Determining Sort Order Teacher Key DATABASE REVIEW KEY Part I Directions: Arrange the steps in creating a database in their proper order by placing a number by each item. Step Procedure 3 Create a table 7 Enter the data 4 Enter the field names 2 Open and save a new database 1 Plan the structure of the database (sketch on paper) 5 Set the data types 6 Set the field properties Part II Directions: Select the appropriate data type or field property for the data listed below: Data Data Type/Field Property C 1. Birth date A Currency F 2. Children? B Input Mask C 3. List of ice cream flavors C Lookup C 4. List of pizza toppings D Number F 5. Married? E Text A 6. Net pay F Yes/No A 7. Price E 8. Street address B 9. Telephone number D 10. Zip code
  • Determining Sort Order Teacher Key
  • Determining Sort Order Student Activity Student Name Period Date DETERMINING SORT ORDER Directions for Part I: Place an A in the Order column for each scenario that is an example of ascending order or a D if the scenario is of descending order Order Scenario 1. The class should line up from the shortest student to the tallest for the vault contest. 2. The library books were shelved in alphabetical order by author’s first name. 3. The most expensive items were listed first. 4. The family reunion photograph shows the babies in the front row and the great-grandparents in the last row. 5. The cities with the most snow days were listed first. 6. The first grade teacher’s mailboxes were assigned before the fifth grade teacher’s. 7. Bus 13 left the parking lot first, Bus 37 was second and Bus 73 left last. 8. The oldest student was allowed to go first in the lunch line, while the youngest was last to get his tray. 9. The mountains were listed on the board. The ones with the highest elevation were listed first while the ones with the lowest elevation were listed last. 10. The cities with the least snow days were listed first.
  • Determining Sort Order Student Activity Student Name Period Date Directions for Part II: Study each list below and determine the sort order. Write A for ascending and D for descending. Order Scenario Order Scenario 1). a). a full tank of gas 2). a). a can of coke b). ¼ tank of gas b). a 16 oz. bottle of coke c). running on empty c). a 2 liter bottle of coke 3). a). a penny 4). a). Seniors b). a nickel b). Juniors c). a dime c). Freshmen 5). a). 1923 6). a). 04/15/2006 b). 1945 b). 07/04/2006 c). 1990 c). 09/25/2006 7). a). David 8). a). Rock b). Christine b). Pop c). Becky c). Classical 9). a). 150 10).a). Abbington Green b). 110 b). Dry Ridge Inn c). 90 c). Secret Garden
  • Determining Sort Order Teacher Key DETERMINING SORT ORDER KEY Directions for Part I: Label each situation or “scenario” as either ascending or descending in the spaces provided. 1. The class should line up from the shortest student to the tallest for the vault A contest. A 2. The library books were shelved in alphabetical order by author’s first name. D 3. The most expensive items were listed first. 4. The family reunion photograph shows the babies in the front row and the A great-grandparents in the last row. D 5. The cities with the most snow days were listed first. D 6. The fifth grade teacher’s mailboxes were assigned before the first grades. A 7. Bus 13 left the parking lot first, bus 37 was second and bus 73 left last. 8. The oldest student was allowed to go first in the lunch line, while the D youngest was last to get his tray. 9. The mountains were listed on the board. The ones with the highest D elevation were listed first while the ones with the lowest elevation were listed last. A 10. The planets with the fewest moons were listed first.
  • Determining Sort Order Teacher Key Directions for Part II: Study each list below and determine the sort order. Write A for Ascending and D for Descending Order Scenario Order Scenario D 1). a). a full tank of gas A 2). a). a can of coke b). ¼ tank of gas b). a 16 oz. bottle of coke c). running on empty c). a 2 liter bottle of coke A 3). a). a penny D 4). a). Seniors b). a nickel b). Juniors c). a dime c). Freshmen A 5). a). 1923 A 6). a). 04/15/2006 b). 1945 b). 07/04/2006 c). 1990 c). 09/25/2006 D 7). a). David D 8). a). Rock b). Christine b). Pop c). Becky c). Classical D 9). a). 150 A 10).a). Abbington Green b). 110 b). Dry Ridge Inn c). 90 c). Secret Garden
  • Understanding Operators Student Activity Student Name Period Date UNDERSTANDING OPERATORS Understanding mathematical operators is necessary when conducting database searches and sorts and applying filters and queries. When instructed to locate information in a database with phrases such as shorter than, taller than, older than etc, you will need to translate the phrase into words that the database understands. In this activity, you will demonstrate your skill at determining what operator to use by matching the mathematical symbol with the words or phrases below. Directions for Part I: Match the symbols with their meanings 1. Less Than A. <> 2. Greater Than B. <= 3. Equal To C. >= 4. Less Than or Equal To D. = 5. Greater Than or Equal To E. < 6. Not Equal To F. > Directions for Part II: Record notes on each of the terms below as you work through this and the next activity. Term Definition Filter Filter by selection Filter/Advanced Filter Sort Sort Criteria
  • Understanding Operators Student Activity Student Name Period Date Directions for Part III: Write the correct statement that would find data that meets the conditions of each criterion. Example: Criteria: At most 36 Answer: <=36 Criteria Statement 1. No more than 5 2. After 1950 3. Before 1920 4. Older than 18 5. Lower than 100 6. Taller than 6 feet 7. Students except Juniors 8. 100 or more 9. 100 or less 10. More than 2000 11. Under 32 12. Over 75 13. Smaller than 3 14. Shorter than 23 15. Not lower than 30 16. Younger than 50 17. At most 63 18. Population growth of 1.9% 19. Since 1941 20. All students except freshmen
  • Understanding Operators Student Activity Student Name Period Date
  • Understanding Operators Teacher Key UNDERSTANDING OPERATORS KEY Understanding mathematical operators is necessary when conducting database searches and sorts and applying filters and queries. When instructed to locate information in a database with phrases such as shorter than, taller than, older than etc, you will need to translate the phrase into words that the database understands. In this activity, you will demonstrate your skill at determining what operator to use by matching the mathematical symbol with the words or phrases below. Directions for Part I: Match the symbols with their meanings. E 1. Less Than A. <> F 2. Greater Than B. <= D 3. Equal To C. >= B 4. Less Than or Equal To D. = C 5. Greater Than or Equal To E. < A 6. Not Equal To F. > Directions for Part II: Record notes on each of the terms below as you work through this and the next activity. Term Definition Filter A tool used to search for specific information within a database Filter by selection Filters for the field or entry that has been selected Filter/Advanced Filters according to specific criteria assigned by Filter Sort the user Sort Arranging information in some form of logical order; alphabetical, chronological, numerical Criteria A condition that must be met or not met in a search
  • Understanding Operators Teacher Key Directions for Part III: Write the correct statement that would find each of the criteria. Example: Criteria: At most 36 Answer: <=36 Criteria Statement 1. No more than 5 <=5 2. After 1950 >1950 3. Before 1920 <1920 4. Older than 18 >18 5. Lower than 100 <100 6. Taller than 6 feet >6 7. Students except Juniors <>Juniors 8. 100 or more >=100 9. 100 or less <=100 10. More than 2000 >2000 11. Under 32 <32 12. Over 75 >75 13. Smaller than 3 <3 14. Shorter than 23 <23 15. Not lower than 30 >=30 16. Younger than 50 <50 17. At most 63 <=63 18. Population growth of 1.9% =1.9 19. Since 1941 >1941 20. All students except freshmen <>Freshmen
  • Guided Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date GUIDED PRACTICE: FILTERING AND SORTING A DATABASE You will follow along with your teacher on this activity to apply sort and filter operations to databases you have already created. You will discuss the procedures as you proceed through the activity in order to confirm an understanding of database logic. Part I: Retrieve the Survey database from Independent Practice: Create a Database: Survey and perform the following tasks: 1. Filter by selection for all males. How is this accomplished? 2. Filter/Advanced Filter Sort for all females with income over $25,000 o What fields will be used in the filter? o What operator is used for each? 3. Filter for all participants with no children o What filter was used? 4. Filter/Advanced Filter Sort for all males under the age of 50 o What filter was used? 5. Filter/Advanced Filter Sort for all females with income over $30,000 with children o What filter was used?
  • Guided Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date 6. In your own words, describe how filter and sort operations are used to manage information in a database. Think about the questions below when writing your answer using the back of this handout or on a separate sheet of paper. o What purpose does a filter or sort operation serve o What effect do filter and sort operations have on the user who is trying to retrieve information? o When might a filter or sort operation be most beneficial? o When might a filter or sort operation be least beneficial? Part II: Retrieve the Computers database from Guided Practice: Create a Database: Computers. Imagine that the database contains 1,000 records and that it is an inefficient use of time to search by simply scrolling through the entries. Use filter and sort to answer the following questions: 1. In which room will you find the computer with the Serial Number 87093? o What filter was used? 2. What is the Serial Number of the computer used by Student #9? o What two methods can be used to find this information? 3. Sort the Student # field in ascending order. List the room number, manufacturer and serial number of the next to last entry. 4. Format the Student Number field as text and perform the sort in Number 3 again. What happens and why? 5. Search for all computers in Rooms 109 or 111. List the serial number(s).
  • Guided Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date GUIDED PRACTICE: FILTERING AND SORTING A DATABASE KEY Part I 1. Place the cursor in any cell of the Gender field that has an “M” and select the Filter by Selection option. 2. Gender and Income Equals and Greater Than 3. Filter by selection by selecting a cell in the Number of Children column with a zero.
  • Guided Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Teacher Key Part I continued 4. Gender=M and Age>50 5. Gender=F, Income > 30000, Children > 0 Part II 1. Criterion: Field= Serial Number, Criteria =87093 2. Filter by selection is also appropriate.
  • Guided Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Teacher Key Part II continued 3. Room: 119 Manufacturer: Gateway Serial Number: 87093 4. The sort doesn’t work properly because the database is not able to recognize the order of the text. 5. 95425, 55557, 83765, 88334
  • Independent Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Student Activity Student Name Period Date INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: FILTERING AND SORTING A DATABASE You will complete this activity independently to apply what you have learned about sorting and filtering a database. For each item, you must copy the results of the affected field(s) into a word document. You should end up with 9 tables in one word document. Label each table appropriately and provide an explanation of how the sort/filter was performed for each. Note: Be careful not to click a yes/no box by accident and change its value Part I: Open the B&B database and complete the following sort tasks in the HistoricInns table. 1. Simple sort: Sort by the B&B Name in ascending order. Copy/paste the sorted B&B field to a word processing document. 2. Simple sort: Sort by the Number of Rooms field in descending order. Copy/paste the Inn field and Rooms field to a word processing document. 3. Complex sort: Move two appropriate fields adjacent to each other to accomplish the sort. Primary field: Rooms in ascending order; Secondary Field: Inn in ascending order. If using Access, the left-most field will be sorted first, so for this sort, you must drag the Rooms field in front of the Inn field. Copy/paste the two fields to a word document. Part II: Using the same database, complete the following filter by selection tasks 4. Historic Inns which do not allow pets 5. Historic Inns which allow pets 6. Historic Inns which allow children under the age of 10
  • Independent Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Student Activity Student Name Period Date 7. Historic Inns located in town (continued on the next page)
  • Independent Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Student Activity Student Name Period Date Part III: Using the same database, complete the following advanced selections 8. Apply an advanced filter that selects records according to the following conditions: • Historic Inns that have more than 4 rooms available • Descending order • Allow both children and pets. Write a criterion statement using operators 9. Apply an advanced filter that selects records according to the following conditions: • Historic Inns that have less than 6 rooms available • Ascending order • Located in a small town/country place • Allows children. Write a criterion statement using operators 10. Save and submit your work according to teacher directions.
  • Independent Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Teacher Key INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: FILTERING AND SORTING A DATABASE KEY (1) Sort by Inn Name (2) Sort by No. of Rooms in Ascending Order Inn Rooms Inn A Bed of Roses 5 A Bed of Roses The Lion and The Rose 5 Abbington Green Inn on Montford (1900) 5 Albermarle Inn The Hawk & Ivy 4 Biltmore Village Inn Secret Garden (1904) 3 Blake House Inn Carolina Bed & Breakfast (3) Sort first by rooms and then by Cedar Crest Victorian Inn Inn in ascending order Chestnut Street Inn Rooms Inn Colby House 3 Secret Garden (1904) Dry Ridge Inn 4 The Hawk & Ivy Inn on Main Street 5 A Bed of Roses Inn on Montford (1900) 5 Colby House North Lodge on Oakland 5 Inn on Montford (1900) Owl's Nest Inn at Engadine 5 The Lion and The Rose Secret Garden (1904) 6 Biltmore Village Inn The Hawk & Ivy 6 Blake House Inn The Lion and The Rose 6 North Lodge on Oakland White Gate Inn and Cottage (1889) 6 White Gate Inn and Cottage (1889) (2) Sort by No. of Rooms 7 Carolina Bed & Breakfast Inn Rooms 7 Inn on Main Street Cedar Crest Victorian Inn 12 7 Owl's Nest Inn at Engadine Albermarle Inn 11 8 Abbington Green Abbington Green 8 8 Chestnut Street Inn Dry Ridge Inn 8 8 Dry Ridge Inn Chestnut Street Inn 8 11 Albermarle Inn Carolina Bed & Breakfast 7 12 Cedar Crest Victorian Inn Owl's Nest Inn at Engadine 7 Inn on Main Street 7 White Gate Inn and Cottage 6 (1889) Biltmore Village Inn 6 North Lodge on Oakland 6 Blake House Inn 6 Colby House 5
  • Independent Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Teacher Key 4) B&Bs with NO pets Pets Name No A Bed of Roses No Albermarle Inn No Cedar Crest Victorian Inn No Chestnut Street Inn No Colby House No Dry Ridge Inn No Inn on Main Street No Inn on Montford (1900) No North Lodge on Oakland No Secret Garden (1904) No The Hawk & Ivy No The Lion and The Rose No White Gate Inn and Cottage (1889) (5) B&Bs with pets Pets Name Yes Abbington Green Yes Biltmore Village Inn Yes Blake House Inn Yes Carolina Bed & Breakfast Yes Owl's Nest Inn at Engadine (6) B&Bs allowing children Name Children Abbington Green Yes Blake House Inn Yes Carolina Bed & Breakfast Yes Chestnut Street Inn Yes Colby House Yes Dry Ridge Inn Yes North Lodge on Oakland Yes The Hawk & Ivy Yes The Lion and The Rose Yes
  • Independent Practice: Filtering and Sorting a Database Teacher Key (6) B&Bs allowing children Name Children White Gate Inn and Cottage (1889) Yes (7) B&Bs in small town/country setting Name Setting Inn on Main Street Town Owl's Nest Inn at Engadine Town Secret Garden (1904) Town The Hawk & Ivy Town (8) B&Bs >4 rooms, pets, children Pets Name Setting Children Rooms City Breakfast Yes Abbington Green Mountain Yes 8 Yes Yes Yes Carolina Bed & Breakfast Mountain Yes 7 Yes Yes Yes Blake House Inn Mountain Yes 6 Yes Yes (9) B&Bs <6 rooms ascending, small town, allows children Pets Name Setting Children Rooms City Breakfasts No The Hawk & Ivy Yes Yes 4 No Yes
  • Types of Relationships graphic organizer Student Activity Student Name Period Date TYPES OF RELATIONSHIPS What is a database relationship and what are the benefits? What is a primary key and why is it used? What is a foreign key and why is it used? What is the purpose of a Junction Table?
  • Types of Relationships graphic organizer Student Activity Student Name Period Date Types of Relationships One-to-Many Many-to-Many How to set up a relationship: What is referential integrity?
  • Guided Practice: One-to-Many Relationships Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date GUIDED PRACTICE: ONE-TO-MANY RELATIONSHIPS Directions: In this activity, you will follow along with your teacher to establish a one- to-many relationship between two database tables. 1. Open the PetRegistry database that has been sent to you electronically by your teacher. 2. Open the PetOwners table and indicate the primary key field: Describe why the field was selected as the primary key field: 3. View/establish a one-to-many relationship between the PetOwners table and the PetRoster table using the primary key of the PetOwners table. Notes: 4. Delete and re-establish the relationship. Notes:
  • Guided Practice: One-to-Many Relationships Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date 5. View the relationships in the PetOwners table by expanding all records. Note: to expand all relationships simultaneously, click on the select all button and then click on one of the + signs. Notes: Select All Button 6. Collapse all relationships 7. The county restricts the number of pets per household to three. Using the PetOwners table, determine how many additional pets can be adopted by the following pet owners by expanding the relationship column beside each owner’s name. a. Tony Landis, (919) 534-3421 b. Dana Lowery, (919) 857-8568 c. Ted Hinson, (919) 854-8574 d. Phyllis Hall, (919) 851-0787 8. Which is the “one” and which is the “many” in the relationship? Explain.
  • Guided Practice: One-to-Many Relationships Teacher Key GUIDED PRACTICE: ONE-TO-MANY RELATIONSHIPS KEY
  • Guided Practice: One-to-Many Relationships Teacher Key
  • Guided Practice: One-to-Many Relationships Teacher Key 7. The county restricts on the number of pets per household to three. Using the PetOwners table, determine how many pets can be adopted by the following pet owners by expanding the relationship column beside each owner’s name. e. Tony Landis, (919) 534-3421.......................................................................0 f. Dana Lowery, (919) 857-8568.....................................................................1 g. Ted Hinson, (919) 854-8574........................................................................0 h. Phyllis Hall, (919) 851-0787.........................................................................2 8. In this relationship, each dog can only have one owner, but each owner can have more than one dog.
  • A Little More Guidance Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date A LITTLE MORE GUIDANCE Directions: In this activity, you will follow along with your teacher to create a new database table based on information from an existing table. 1. Open the States database that has been sent to you electronically by your teacher and save it to your files. 2. Create a new table and save it as JustStates 3. The first field is formatted as the primary key field, using ID as the field name. If the first field has not been created already, create it now, using AutoNumber and setting it as the primary key field. 4. Add a new field named States 5. Set the data type as Lookup or leave it as Text, depending on your preferred method of retrieving the data from the State table (see methods below) Method 1 – Use the Lookup Wizard a. Select the Lookup Wizard as the data type b. Select the option to look up the values in a table or query c. Select the State table d. Select the State Abbreviation and State Name fields e. Select ascending order by state abbreviation f. Save and view the data, which will appear in a drop down list Method 2 – Copy and paste values a. Use the default data type (text) b. Open the State table and select and copy the State Name column c. Select the Lookup tab in the Field Properties section d. Select List Box as the display control e. Select Value List as the row source type f. Select the row source window and use the paste command to enter the copied list of states g. Set State Name as the default entry View the table and notice that you have all of the states available in a drop down menu and saved the excessive time of rekeying all of the information in.
  • A Little More Guidance Teacher Demonstration Student Name Period Date
  • Independent Practice: One-to-Many Relationships Student Activity Student Name Period Date INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: ONE-TO-MANY RELATIONSHIPS Directions: In this activity, you will work independently to establish a one-to-many relationship between two database tables. 1. Open a new database and save it as Authors. 2. Create a database table named Authors using the information below and using the Authors field as the primary key Authors Database Authors Table Authors Publishers Evanovich, Janet Penguin Putnam Inc Hautman, Pete Fulcrum Books Hillerman, Tony Random House Hopkins, Ellen Penguin Putnam Inc Hosseini, Khaled Harper Books Meyer, Stepheni Reader's Choice Rowling, J K Markee Brothers 3. Create another table named Publications a. Do not set a primary key b. Use a lookup data type for the authors and key the authors’ names in the values list
  • Independent Practice: One-to-Many Relationships Student Activity Student Name Period Date c. Enter the data in the table d. Save the table 4. Open the relationships window and establish a one-to-many relationship between the Authors and Publications tables using the primary key from the Authors table 5. Open the Authors table and expand the relationship for each author 6. Save and submit your work according to teacher directions 7. Think about how a bookstore would use the information and record your thoughts in the space below.
  • Independent Practice: One-to-Many Relationships Teacher Key INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: ONE-TO-MANY RELATIONSHIPS KEY
  • Guided Practice: Many-to-Many Relationships Teacher Demonstration Student Name: Period: Date: GUIDED PRACTICE: MANY-TO-MANY RELATIONSHIPS Directions: For this activity, you will follow along with your teacher to establish a many-to-many relationship. In a many-to-many relationship, two tables with a one-to- many relationship are linked by a junction table. 1. Open the Beach Rentals_Student database that has been sent to you electronically by your teacher 2. In the Customers table, set the CustomerID field as the primary key field 3. In the Properties table, set the PropertyID field as the primary key field 4. Create a Junction Table: a. Use AutoNumber for the ID field and set it as the primary key Notes: Note: An easy way to identify a junction table is to view the fields in each table. The table that contains all of the primary keys from the other related tables is the junction table! b. Use a lookup data type for the PropertyName field and key the property names as the values Notes:
  • Guided Practice: Many-to-Many Relationships Teacher Demonstration Student Name: Period: Date: c. Use an input mask, short date format for the date field Notes: 5. Establish a one-to-many relationship between the Customers table and the Rentals table using the primary key from the Customers table Notes: 6. Select the option to enforce referential integrity for both relationships 7. Establish a one-to-many relationship between the Properties table and the Rentals table using the primary key from the Properties table 8. Save and answer the questions on the next page.
  • Guided Practice: Many-to-Many Relationships Teacher Demonstration Student Name: Period: Date: Open the Customers table and try to delete Bob Dixon. What happens? Why? Expand all of the relationships in the Customers table. Which renter has rented the most properties? Expand all of the relationships in the Properties table. Which property is the most popular? How can this type of relational database be used in business? Why is it important to understand database relationships? Why is it important to enforce referential integrity in this database?
  • Guided Practice: Many-to-Many Relationships Teacher Key GUIDED PRACTICE: MANY-TO-MANY RELATIONSHIPS KEY Open the Customers table and try to delete Bob Dixon. What happens? Why? Bob Dixon cannot be deleted because he is linked to another table. Expand all of the relationships in the Customers table. Which renter has rented the most properties? Cricket Chianelli Expand all of the relationships in the Properties table. Which property is the most popular? Sea Captain How can this type of relational database be used in a business? A beach rental company would use this database to keep track of customers and property owners. The beach rental company could quickly look up information sorted by property or by customer. Why is it important to understand database relationships? Databases are used by businesses worldwide to manage information. Database relationships increase the effectiveness and power of databases by allowing information to be organized into manageable and logical chunks of related data (tables) and by enabling communication between multiple tables. Why is it important to enforce referential integrity in this database? To help protect data from being deleted or corrupted
  • Independent Practice: Many-to-Many Relationships Student Activity Student Name: Period: Date: INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: MANY-TO-MANY RELATIONSHIPS Directions: For this activity, you will work independently to create a many-to- many relationship. 1. Open the Flights_Student database that has been sent to you electronically. 2. Follow teacher instructions for saving the database to your student directory. 3. Create a database table named Pilots a. Set the PilotID data type as number and make it the primary key field b. Do not make any errors as you key the information from the table below: PilotID Pilot Name 332341 Motley, Dan 384858 Main, Hydie 528966 Long, John 754858 Penny, Annie 838488 Swain, Bob 859699 Young, Debra 908948 Lox, Bailey 958678 Anderson, Lee 4. Save and close the Pilots table. 5. Establish a one-to-many relationship between the Flights table and the Reservations table using the Flight# field in the Flights table as the link to the FlightNo field in the Reservations table 6. Establish a one-to-many relationship between the Reservations table and the Pilots table using the PilotID field in the Pilots table as the link to the Pilot field in the Reservations table 7. Enforce referential integrity in the link between the Pilots table and the Reservations table
  • Independent Practice: Many-to-Many Relationships Student Activity Student Name: Period: Date: Answer the following questions: 1. What is the function of referential integrity in this activity? a. It prevents a pilot from being deleted from the pilots table if the pilot has been assigned to a flight in the reservations table b. It allows a pilot to be deleted from the pilots table if the pilot has been assigned to a flight in the reservations table 2. Perform a filter for the flights listed below to answer the questions about the Flights table a. How many pilots does Northwest Flight 99 have? b. How many passengers does Northwest Flight 99 have? c. How many passengers does US Airways Flight 5474 have? 3. Open the Pilots table and answer the following questions: a. Which pilot has the most passengers? b. Which pilot has the least? 4. How is the expanded relationship information helpful to the following people: a. Customers b. Pilots c. Airline stewards d. Reservations specialists 5. Save and submit your work according to teacher dirctions
  • Independent Practice: Many-to-Many Relationships Student Activity Student Name: Period: Date:
  • Independent Practice: Many-to-Many Relationships Teacher Key INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: MANY-TO-MANY RELATIONSHIPS KEY Answer the following questions: 1. What is the function of referential integrity in this activity? a. It prevents a pilot from being deleted from the pilots table if the pilot has been assigned to a flight in the reservations table b. It allows a pilot to be deleted from the pilots table if the pilot has been assigned to a flight in the reservations table 2. Perform a filter for the flights listed below to answer the questions about the Flights table a. How many pilots does Flight 99 have? ..........................................................1 b. How many customers does Flight 99 have? .................................................1 c. How many customers does Flight 5474 have? ...........................................11 3. Open the Pilots table and answer the following questions: a. Which pilot has the most passengers? .........................................Dan Motley b. Which pilot has the least? ..........................................................Debra Young 4. How is the expanded relationship information helpful to the following people? a. Customers Customers can find out flight information, such as flight number and pilot information. If concerned about safety, they may choose to check out the pilot on the Internet. b. Pilots Pilots can quickly see how full their flight is c. Airline stewards Airline stewards can check the flight roster d. Reservations specialists Reservations specialists can view flight data to find out how many spaces are left and answer customer inquiries about flight arrival and departure times
  • Guided Practice: Importing Data Teacher Demonstration Student Name: Period: Date: GUIDED PRACTICE: IMPORTING DATA Data used in a database table can be imported from other sources. In this exercise, you will follow along with your teacher to import a word processing file into a database. The procedures for importing data require that the data be arranged in rows and columns. When importing a data processing document, the file format must be saved as text. Directions: 1. Using word processing software, key the information below (raw data) in the exact format with the commas, spacing, and line returns. Raw Data: Event No.,Event,Level,Transcript,Objective Test 1,Accounting I,HS,Y,Y 2,Accounting II,HS,Y,Y 4,Banking and Financial Systems,HS,N,Y 5,Business Calculations,HS,N,Y 6,Business Communication,HS,N,Y 10,Business Law,HS,Y,Y 11,Business Math,HS,Y,Y 14,Business Procedures,HS,Y,Y 2. Save the data in text format. 3. Open the database software and name the database FBLA unless otherwise instructed. 4. Follow procedures for importing the data into a database table. Notes: 5. Store the data in a new table. Name the table Competitive Events unless instructed otherwise.
  • Guided Practice: Importing Data Teacher Demonstration Student Name: Period: Date: INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: IMPORTING DATA Directions: In this exercise, you will work independently to import a word processing file into a database. Key the data below using word processing software and save it in text format using a file name assigned by your teacher. Import the data into a database table and submit your work according to teacher directions. Complete the written response section at the end of this activity. Points to Remember: • Remember, you must have an open database before you can import a file. • Once the data has been imported, format the field properties so that the Enrollment field has comma separators and zero decimal places and the Tuition fields are formatted as currency. • Name the database according to teacher directions. • Answer the questions at the end of this activity and submit your work. Raw Data: Name,Ownership,Type,Enrollment,InState,OutofState Appalachian State,Public,4 yr,14653,$4000,$13600 East Carolina,Public,4 yr,22767,$4487,$15000 Fayetteville,Public,4 yr,5441,$3860,$13596 A & T,Public,4 yr,10383,$4200,$13000 UNC Chapel Hill,Public,4 yr,26878,$5513,$19311 UNC Greensboro,Public,4 yr,15329,$49440,$16500 UNC Wilmington,Public,4 yr,11574,$4694,$14405 Winston-Salem State,Public,4 yr,4805,$3905,$12545 Written Response: Write a step by step procedure for importing data from a word processing file into a database table.
  • Independent Practice: Importing Data Teacher Key INDEPENDENT PRACTICE: IMPORTING DATA KEY Procedure for Importing Data into a Database Table: (May vary with software) 1. Format the raw source data in columns and rows separated by spaces or commas. 2. Save the raw source data in plain text format. 3. Open and save a new database. 4. Use the menu or wizard options to import the source data. 5. Select the appropriate options regarding type of delimiters and headings. 6. Name the table. 7. Complete the import. 8. Format the data if required.
  • Database Concept Review Student Activity Student Name: Period: Date: DATABASE CONCEPT REVIEW Directions: Answer the questions below. 1. In your own words provide the definition of a database. 2. List 3 examples of a database. 3. What is a database relationship? 4. Work with a partner and describe a one-to-many relationship using a database and tables you make up. Draw the tables on paper and key descriptions of each, then cut and paste the descriptions onto the paper.
  • Database Concept Review Student Activity Student Name: Period: Date: 5. Work with a partner and describe a many-to-many relationship using a database and tables you make up. 6. Work with a partner and draw a picture of the database, the tables, and the many-to-many relationship on the back of this sheet. 7. Give an example of how referential integrity could be used in your scenario (#6) 8. Number the following database elements in order from largest to smallest. a. _____ Field c. _____ Record b. _____ Database d. _____ Entry 9. Match the field types with the correct definition. a. Allows you to create a finite set of choices for Text that field’s entry values. Number b. Is a true/false field Lookup Wizard c. Date and time entries in various formats. d. This includes not only words, but also Date/Time numbers not used in calculations. e. This field may not include anything other than Currency numbers. AutoNumber f. Like text, but max of 64,000 characters. g. Creates fields that automatically enter a Yes/No unique number when a record is added. h. Currency values expressed in various formats.
  • Database Concept Review Student Activity Student Name: Period: Date:
  • Database Concept Review Teacher Key DATABASE CONCEPT REVIEW KEY Directions: Answer the questions below. 1. In your own words provide the definition of a database. • Student answers will vary 2. List 3 examples of a database. • Telephone book| • Computerized Library card catalog • Student data (NCWISE) • iTunes • Personal address book • CD-Rom Encyclopedias • Job Search • Fingerprint database • Customer contact list • Houses for sale and MLS listings online • Hospital/patient data • Business stock inventory • Barcode scanners keep inventory in databases • Internet search engines database • Encyclopedias & Dictionaries 3. A database relationship is a link between common fields of two or more tables in a database. 4. Answers will vary – invite students to share their examples with the class 5. Answers will vary 6. Answers will vary 7. Answers will vary 8. Answers will vary 9. Number the following database elements in order from largest to smallest. 1 Database 2 Record 3 Field
  • Database Concept Review Teacher Key 4 Entry
  • Database Concept Review Teacher Key Match the field types with the correct definition. a. Allows you to create a finite set of choices D Text for that field’s entry values. E Number b. Is a true/false field A Lookup Wizard c. Date and time entries in various formats. d. This includes not only words, but also C Date/Time numbers no used in calculations. e. This field may not include anything other H Currency than numbers. G AutoNumber f. Like text, but max of 64,000 characters. g. Creates fields that automatically enter a B Yes/No unique number when a record is added. h. Currency values expressed in various formats.