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  • The Applied Population Lab is a group of research and outreach professionals located within the Department of Community and Environmental Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. We specialize in providing demographic information to individuals and groups in the State of Wisconsin and elsewhere. We have been providing small area population estimates and projections since the mid-1960s.Today I will be discussing redistricting in the State of Wisconsin and how race/ethnic groups are concentrated within the Assembly Districts.
  • Overall State Population 2000 & 2010 by race/ethnicity.
  • There are several components to the redistricting statutes that were adopted in the 1980s. The part of the statutes that I’m interested in for this research states that assembly and senate districts maintain the integrity of the political subdivisions & of communities of interest.In the summer of 2011 these laws were rewritten.
  • Act 39 & Act 43So what did this mean for the redistricting process. . .In 2001, local governments utilized WISE-LR to create wards. After this process was complete ward boundaries were given to the legislature.In 2011, local governments had already begun the process of creating ward boundaries (using WISE-LR) when the legislature adopted these new laws, Act 39 and Act 43, creating the senate and assembly districts.
  • My purpose today is to investigate how do racially and ethnically distinct groups within Wisconsin’s legislative districts compare between 2001 and 2011?The intent of the law has been to create districts that will enhance participation of different racial or ethnic minority groups in the political process. I’m interested in making this comparison to see if the outcome from two different processes created districts that would then provide an opportunity for participation by members of racial or language minority groups.Data - Shapefiles downloaded from the Legislative Technology Services Bureau: http://legis.wisconsin.gov/ltsb/redistricting/data.htm
  • Change in population (over 18 yrs old) from 2000 to 2010Non-Hispanic White Majority - % White has decreasedwhile three other race/ethnic groups (African American, Hispanic, Asian) has increased from 2000 to 2010. American Indian has remained relatively the same.
  • Now if we look at the same information in a graph form some additional observations can be made. Of the different race/ethnic groups in the State of Wisconsin White and to some degree Native Americans are less diverse than African American, Hispanic , and Asian.
  • Similar patterns from 2000 to 2010. Non-Hispanic white decreases while other race and ethnic groups increase.More diversity within majority minority populations or is the population more dispersed throughout the state?
  • Map of 2000 Minority Blocks
  • Map of 2010 Minority Blocks

Redistricting Redistricting Presentation Transcript

  • Redistricting in Wisconsin Presentation to the Wisconsin Land Information Association Conference February 16, 2012Sarah Kemp, ResearcherUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonPhone: 608-256-6781Email: kemp@wisc.edu
  • Redistricting in Wisconsin• Summary of the State Population• Review of Redistricting History• Research Question• Data and Methodology• Results• Future Research
  • Total Population for the State of Wisconsin by Race/Ethnicity 2000 2010 2000 to 2010 Change Number Percent Number Percent Number PercentTotal Population 5,363,675 100.0% 5,686,986 100.0% 323,311 6.0%Race/EthnicityOne race 5,296,780 98.8% 5,582,669 98.2% 285,889 5.4% Non-Hispanic White 4,769,857 88.9% 4,902,067 86.2% 132,210 2.8% African American 304,460 5.7% 359,148 6.3% 54,688 18.0% American Indian 47,228 0.9% 54,526 1.0% 7,298 15.5% Asian 88,763 1.7% 129,234 2.3% 40,471 45.6% Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 192,921 3.6% 336,056 5.9% 143,135 74.2%  The percentage of non-Hispanic white decreased while the percentage of all other race/ethnic groups increased from 2000 to 2010.  All race/ethnic population groups increased from 2000 to 2010.  Non-Hispanic white population increased the least (3%) while Hispanic population increased the most (74%).
  • RedistrictingRedistricting prior to 2011State Statutes (1980s) - Reflect a good faith effort to apportion thelegislature giving due consideration to the maintenance of the integrity ofpolitical subdivisions and of communities of interest. [4.001(3)]Assembly and Senate districts were determined by the courts and not thelegislature in the 1990s and 2000s.Summer of 2011Act 39 (August 8, 2011) Local Redistricting - Wards and Supervisory DistrictsAct 43 (August 23, 2011) Redistricting of Senate and Assembly Districts
  • RedistrictingAct 39 Section 5.15 (1) (a) 2. indicates that wards are to becreated in such a way that aldermanic and supervisorydistricts can be created allowing enhanced participation bymembers of racial or language minority groups.Act 43 created the 2011 assembly and senate districts andrepealed the language regarding communities of interest.2001 Blocks Wards Legislative Districts2011 Blocks Legislative Districts Wards
  • Research QuestionHow does the concentration of racially and ethnicallydistinct groups within Wisconsin’s legislative districtscompare between 2001 and 2011?Data• Census Block data, 2000 and 2010• Assembly District data, 2002 and 2011Methodology• ArcGIS
  • Percent Population (over 18 years old) by Race/Ethnicity Majority Race/Ethnicity, 2000 Non-Hispanic African Native White American Hispanic Asian AmericanNon-Hispanic White 94.0% 18.2% 26.2% 27.2% 14.9%African American 1.6% 73.7% 7.5% 9.6% 0.1%Hispanic 2.1% 4.5% 61.1% 6.5% 1.7%Asian 1.3% 2.1% 2.6% 54.1% 0.0%Native American 0.7% 0.6% 1.7% 0.9% 82.9%Total 99.8% 99.0% 99.1% 98.3% 99.6% Majority Race/Ethnicity, 2010 Non-Hispanic African Native White American Hispanic Asian AmericanNon-Hispanic White 91.5% 15.6% 23.0% 24.1% 13.4%African American 2.1% 75.0% 9.2% 11.6% 0.3%Hispanic 3.3% 5.1% 63.7% 5.3% 2.4%Asian 2.0% 2.8% 2.3% 57.3% 0.1%Native American 0.8% 0.6% 1.4% 0.8% 83.4%Total 99.8% 99.1% 99.6% 99.0% 99.7%
  • Majority Race/Ethnicity, 2000 By Census Block 100.0% Non-Hispanic White 90.0% African American 80.0% Hispanic 70.0% Asian Native American 60.0%Percent Population 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Non-Hispanic White African American Hispanic Asian Native American Race/Ethnicity Majority Population
  • Majority Race/Ethnicity, 2010 By Census Block 100.0% Non-Hispanic White 90.0% African American 80.0% Hispanic 70.0% Asian Native American 60.0%Percent Population 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Non-Hispanic White African American Hispanic Asian Native American Race/Ethnicity Majority Population
  • 2000 Minority Population (over 18) by Census Block
  • 2010 Minority Population (over 18) by Census Block
  • Results Majority Minority Population by Assembly District, 2000 African Native American Hispanic Asian American Non-Hispanic White 18.3% 26.5% 28.6% 14.9% African American 74.4% 7.6% 10.1% 0.1% Hispanic 4.6% 61.6% 3.3% 1.7% Asian 2.1% 2.6% 57.0% 0.0% Native American 0.6% 1.7% 0.9% 83.3% District Count 64 77 79 47 Majority Minority Populaton by Assembly District, 2010 African Native American Hispanic Asian American Non-Hispanic White 15.7% 23.1% 24.3% 13.5% African American 75.7% 9.2% 11.7% 0.3% Hispanic 5.1% 64.0% 5.3% 2.4% Asian 2.8% 2.3% 57.8% 0.1% Native American 0.6% 1.4% 0.8% 98.5% District Count 93 94 92 74
  • Results Top 5 Assembly Districts with Greatest Population Totals African American Hispanic Asian Native American 2000 2010 2000 2010 2000 2010 2000 2010 10 10 8 8 77 77 36 36 16 16 9 9 18 11 74 74 17 18 61 66 78 18 5 87 11 17 64 47 85 16 34 5 18 11 88 65 81 98 92 6
  • Findings• Percent minority population increased while percent non-Hispanic white population decreased from 2000 to 2010.• Persons of color appear to be more dispersed throughout the State of Wisconsin from 2000 to 2010.• Percent population (over 18) of majority minority population has increased for African American, Hispanic and native American populations within assembly districts.• Asian American percent population (over 18) remained the same within assembly districts.
  • Future Research• Evaluate population in assembly districts with a higher concentration of minority populations.• Compare 2000 & 2010 minority population by local wards.• Compare 2010 population by 2001 assembly districts to 2000 population by 2001 assembly districts.
  • THANK YOU ! Sarah Kemp Applied Population LaboratoryUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison 608-256-6781 kemp@wisc.edu