Page 1
Resilience and Development
Strenghtening Resilience in
Fragile Contexts
and Experiences from the Philippines
Resili...
Page 2
 Concept claims to offer a new and different way of thinking
about both, development cooperation as well as humani...
Page 3
 affected population is insufficient prepared and unable to respond
adequately to crisis
 state institutions ofte...
Page 4
Resilience is about …
Community
Regional
National
level
Identifying and addressing
causes of vulnerability
Preventi...
Page 5
Working Definition of ‘Resilience‘
What are the parts to look for?
Resilience is…
„… the ability of states, organis...
Page 6
Resilience plays a central role as the guiding cross-sectoral concept in the
German ‘Strategy of Transitional Devel...
Page 7
Learning with different implementing partners (NGOs, GIZ, WFP) on HOW TO
OPERATIONALIZE resilience and LRRD in five...
Page 8
Resilience – Our Understandig
Resilience is …
 a dynamic concept
 not everywhere and any time the same
 oriented...
Page 9
Why Caraga?
 Request from the Philippine Government to
the German Government to get involved in
Mindanao (2007)
 ...
Page 10
From understanding to action: grasping the context
GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace
A thorough and...
Page 11
Indigenous Practices for
the Conservation of
Biodiversity
in Agusan Marsh
Objective:
In selected areas of Caraga r...
Page 12
Key factors for strengthening resilience
GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace
COSERAM not designed wit...
Page 13
COSERAM – Some Achievements
GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace
from a resilience perspective
 Enhan...
Page 14
Key lessons drawn from GIZ‘s work
GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace
• Trivial but fundamental: comp...
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Strenghtening resilience in fragile contexts_GIZ

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Presented at the Resilience 2014, May 8, Montpellier. Presented by Barbara Abbentheren, Dr. Klaus H. Schreiner from GIZ.

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Strenghtening resilience in fragile contexts_GIZ

  1. 1. Page 1 Resilience and Development Strenghtening Resilience in Fragile Contexts and Experiences from the Philippines Resilience2014 Conference Montpellier 8 May 2014 Barbara Abbentheren, Dr. Klaus H. Schreiner Division for Security, Reconstruction and Peace
  2. 2. Page 2  Concept claims to offer a new and different way of thinking about both, development cooperation as well as humanitarian assistance – and of approaching challenges and risks, particularly in fragile contexts and situations of protracted or recurrent crises. Changed point of view.  Integrated / holistic approach for humanitarian and development actors – LRRD (Linking Relief, Rehabilitation and Development) The Guiding Questions: What is different in a resilience-based approach? What is the relevance of the concept for development actors? Added value to development cooperation? For people and communities in need? New label to old approaches?
  3. 3. Page 3  affected population is insufficient prepared and unable to respond adequately to crisis  state institutions often not capable (or willing) to take appropriate measures to deal with effects of crisis and to protect the population from risks  combination of complex stresses and low resilience can lead to permanent vulnerability that constrains development of societies and individuals and fosters poverty The approach strengthening the resilience of individuals, societies and institutions strives to break the vicious circle of emergency situations and chronic poverty in order to enable long-term development perspectives. Relevance in the context we work in: Populations in fragile states are more vulnerable to man-made crisis and extreme natural events because…
  4. 4. Page 4 Resilience is about … Community Regional National level Identifying and addressing causes of vulnerability Preventing negative coping strategies Responding to and coping with shocks and stresses Understanding the social, economical and institutional context Creating favorable (political, economical, social) frame conditions to strengthen resilience Ensuring actions do not compromise well-being of vulnerable individuals and groups Strengthening absorptive and adaptive capacities Strengthening transfor- mative capacities
  5. 5. Page 5 Working Definition of ‘Resilience‘ What are the parts to look for? Resilience is… „… the ability of states, organisations and individuals to cope with and quickly recover from shocks or stresses resulting from fragile contexts, crises, violent conflict and extreme natural hazards, and to constantly adapt to changing circumstances and transform where it is necessary to guarantee sustainable development. Source: GIZ – NICD, Network International Cooperation in Conflicts and Disasters, 2013 Level Context Capacity Risks GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace
  6. 6. Page 6 Resilience plays a central role as the guiding cross-sectoral concept in the German ‘Strategy of Transitional Development Assistance’ (BMZ): Overarching aim of transitional development assistance is to strengthen the resilience of people and institutions to withstand the impact and consequences of crises, violent conflict and extreme weather events. Resilience likewise increasingly relevant in a variety of other sectors as, for example, Climate Change Adaptation, Rural Development and Agriculture, Good Governance, Peace and Security. Challenges for all actors: How to operationalize the paradigm ‘Strengthening Resilience’ of people, communities and institutions? How to avoid just to add the ‘Resilience label’ to project titles but to make a real difference? The Challenge: Translating Resilience into Programming
  7. 7. Page 7 Learning with different implementing partners (NGOs, GIZ, WFP) on HOW TO OPERATIONALIZE resilience and LRRD in five programmes in Madagascar, Haiti and South Sudan. Objectives: (1) systematically share, analyse and compile lessons learnt and good practice from project implementation through a facilitated Dialogue Platform, and (2) integrate these experiences into existing and future concepts, projects and political positioning. A final learning conference, presumably in the end of 2015, is planned to summarize the outcomes. Key questions to be answered:  How can ‘Strengthening Resilience’ be effectively realized in project planning and implementation?  How do we know, that we are successful in ‘Strengthening Resilience’? How can we measure impact of resilience strengthening measures? How can resilience be measured?  Where are the limits and boundaries of the concept? The BMZ Resilience Learning Initiative – RLI
  8. 8. Page 8 Resilience – Our Understandig Resilience is …  a dynamic concept  not everywhere and any time the same  oriented on systems Resilience should always be development- oriented and focus on a change of the status quo Resilience offers options to …  multi-sectoral action  multi-level approaches  better linkage between short-, middle and long-term measures  a better coordination and cooperation between programmes and donors Everything new? • Many programmes are already focusing on the strengthening of resilience on different levels. • First experiences exist, we do not start by ‚0‘. • The approaches do not follow (yet) a concrete resilience strategy. More ideas and thoughts on resilience: • Resilience means to support the ability to act. • The ability to act is always based on the prerequisite to take informed decisions • To be able to take informed decisions, mechanisms for articulation and aggregation of opinions, options and interests do have to be strengthened on local, regional and national level.
  9. 9. Page 9 Why Caraga?  Request from the Philippine Government to the German Government to get involved in Mindanao (2007)  Vast natural resources (forest, minerals), but high rank on Poverty Index  Multi-faceted conflict situation  Weak presence of donor organizations, particularly in the field of conflict transformation. COSERAM supports an integrated approach of poverty reduction and peace building in the region of Caraga, Philippines since January 2011. COSERAM is a joint undertaking of the Governments of the Philippines and Germany implemented by local institutions with the support of GIZ and KfW (German Development Bank). The ‘Conflict Sensitive Resource and Asset Management’ (COSERAM) GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace
  10. 10. Page 10 From understanding to action: grasping the context GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace A thorough and comprehensive analysis of the environment and context of the proposed project was essential for the design of the programme. A 18-month preparatory programme provide the space for it.
  11. 11. Page 11 Indigenous Practices for the Conservation of Biodiversity in Agusan Marsh Objective: In selected areas of Caraga region governance of natural resources is ensured in a peaceful and sustainable manner, benefiting the community. TC-module 2 (07/2012 – 12/2014) COMPONENT 1 Resource Management: Sustainable Management of land and natural resources in selected areas of Caraga region is improved COMPONENT 2 Human Security: Peace building needs of selected local communities are addressed TC-module 1 (01/2011 – 12/2014)  Local Conflict Transformation and Legal Aid  Human Security of Communities  Support for ‘Livelihoods’  Harmonization of land uses  Strengthen regulation and enforcement processes  Equitable and sustainable management & use of natural resources  Documentation of indigenous practices  Strengthen conflict sensitive protected area management  Improvement of actual biodiversity status in area Objective: Indigenous knowledge, methods and practices are used for the conservation of biodiversity and a conflict sensitive and sustainable management of natural resources in Agusan Marsh. COSERAM: Objectives & Contributions GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace
  12. 12. Page 12 Key factors for strengthening resilience GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace COSERAM not designed with a resilience objective in mind, however the interaction and interrelations of components and activities resulted in strengthening the resilience of individuals, communities and institutions. In the project’s design and implementation:  Working at and linking of different levels (local, provincial, national – micro, meso, macro)  Managing competing interests: indigenous people, women, environmental groups, government, companies/ investors  Embedding programme into local government structures  Developing capacities in the different dimensions (individual, institution, system)  Applying a political economy perspective  Addressing governance issues  Sequencing of objectives and related activities  Component 1  absorptive and adaptive capacities / Component 2 & Component 3  transformative capacities  Ensuring actions do not compromise well-being of vulnerable individuals  Informed decisions on trade-offs
  13. 13. Page 13 COSERAM – Some Achievements GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace from a resilience perspective  Enhanced security of tenure empowers local communities and claimants. Obtaining clear land titles and support of titling claims helps (indigenous) communities and individuals to define and pursue their own development objectives before they are overrun by externally steered processes.  Increasing government awareness … of peace and development needs and urgency to be reflected in development plans and budgets … to understand and address concerns of indigenous people.  Emphasizing empowerment, ownership, and participation while focusing on disadvantaged groups contributes to empowering the society to make the best possible choices with special regard to conflict and resource management.
  14. 14. Page 14 Key lessons drawn from GIZ‘s work GIZ | Div. 48 Security, Reconstruction and Peace • Trivial but fundamental: comprehensive understanding of the context: actors, frame conditions, policies, interrelated and interdependent factors and effects etc. Thorough analysis as cornerstone for sound design and implementation of programme. • Abandon compartimentalised technical approach in favour of holistic and systemic attitude. Plan synergies: Analyse gaps and enforce linkages between levels and sectors to create and enhance impact. • Linking policies, government institutions, and local actors.  Understanding inter-linkages of risks; integration into planning and operations helps to build resilience of communities, individuals, as well as the state and its institutions.  Acceptance that there are no quick solutions and a need for long-term constructive engagement in order to create sustainable and inclusive (economic) development.
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