piloting and upscaling of mus - IWMI/WRC Research Uptake Workshop
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  • 1. ‘Action Research’ Example: Piloting and Upscaling of Multiple Use water Services (MUS) Barbara van Koppen & Stef Smits
  • 2. A water services approach in rural and peri-urban areas that takes people’s multiple water needs as starting point of planning and provision of water services within public sector mandate of better using water for poverty alleviation A solution: a vision of impact An a priori Theory of Change
  • 3. 1. Structure multi-stakeholder learning alliances (MUS Group) for exchange/learning, knowledge hub and repository, strategic advocacy in national (e.g. DWA) and international forums (e.g., World Water Forums) 2. ‘Projects’ are just building blocks 3. The role of science: – synthesizing lessons learnt – identifying hypotheses and future agendas (‘learning wheels’) – promoting new implementation of better solutions Long-term learning alliances on ‘why’ and ‘how’
  • 4. • Non-planned water uses happen anyhow: turn the problem into an opportunity • Recognize – formalize local practice • Sub-sectors: Incremental cost-benefit analysis • Community-driven planning: ownership and leveraging indigenous capitals of holistic self-supply from ecosystems Science in the ‘why’: rigorously ‘making the case’
  • 5. • Implementing strategic pilots in collaboration with champion implementers, service providers and policy makers: to make a generic and replicable case • Upscaling initiatives with different partners: – through WASH sub-sector; – through irrigation sub-sector; – As MUS by design • Example synthesis: MUS Group: Generic guidelines for planning and providing Multiple use water services • Example ‘learning wheel’ of key principles Science in the ‘how’ : piloting and upscaling MUS
  • 6. Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impacts among national level stakeholdersCoordination of planning, implementation and financing of MUS among national level organisations that enables coordination among intermediate level stakeholders Capacity to support a learning approach to MUS among intermediate level organisations National policies, legislation, norms and standards allow for integrated participatory project cycles at local and enabling intermediate level National water policies, legislation, and implementation programs allocate resources to enhance physical access of the poor to an equitable share of water for multiple uses Implementing and scaling up a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach; principles at national level for an enabling environment National water policies and legislation, and their enforcement strategies, enhance legal access of the poor to an equitable share of water for multiple uses Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impacts among all intermediate level stakeholders Participatory project cycles followed in implementation programmes Resources exist among intermediate level stakeholders to implement and upscale MUS Coordination of planning, implementation and financing among intermediate level stakeholders Capacity to follow a learning approach to MUS among intermediate level organisations Intermediate level institutions to support communities in operation and maintenance and other support to MUS Enabling environment for implementing and scaling up a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach; principles at intermediate/service provider level Community National Intermediate Flows of information and communication Flows of information and communication Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impact Proper financial models Thorough understanding of poor people’s water-based livelihoods Appropriate technology Effective and inclusive community institutions Sustainable use of available water resources and services Implementing a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach for improved livelihoods- principles to be addressed in the different phases of the project cycle at community level
  • 7. Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impact Proper financial models Thorough understanding of poor people’s water-based livelihoods Appropriate technology Effective and inclusive community institutions Sustainable use of available water resources and services Implementing a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach for improved livelihoods- principles to be addressed in the different phases of the project cycle at community level Community Level
  • 8. Enabling environment at national level (to be elaborated in the next slide) Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impacts among all intermediate level stakeholders Participatory project cycles followed in implementation programmes Resources exist among intermediate level stakeholders to implement and upscale MUS Coordination of planning, implementation and financing among intermediate level stakeholders Capacity to follow a learning approach to MUS among intermediate level organisations Intermediate level institutions to support communities in operation and maintenance and other support to MUS Enabling environment for implementing and scaling up a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach; principles at intermediate/service provider level Intermediate Level
  • 9. Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impacts among national level stakeholders Coordination of planning, implementation and financing of MUS among national level organisations that enables coordination among intermediate level stakeholders Capacity to support a learning approach to MUS among intermediate level organisations National policies, legislation, norms and standards allow for integrated participatory project cycles at local and enabling intermediate level National water policies, legislation, and implementation programs allocate resources to enhance physical access of the poor to an equitable share of water for multiple uses Implementing and scaling up a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach; principles at national level for an enabling environment National Level National water policies and legislation, and their enforcement strategies, enhance legal access of the poor to an equitable share of water for multiple uses
  • 10. Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impacts among national level stakeholdersCoordination of planning, implementation and financing of MUS among national level organisations that enables coordination among intermediate level stakeholders Capacity to support a learning approach to MUS among intermediate level organisations National policies, legislation, norms and standards allow for integrated participatory project cycles at local and enabling intermediate level National water policies, legislation, and implementation programs allocate resources to enhance physical access of the poor to an equitable share of water for multiple uses Implementing and scaling up a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach; principles at national level for an enabling environment National water policies and legislation, and their enforcement strategies, enhance legal access of the poor to an equitable share of water for multiple uses Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impacts among all intermediate level stakeholders Participatory project cycles followed in implementation programmes Resources exist among intermediate level stakeholders to implement and upscale MUS Coordination of planning, implementation and financing among intermediate level stakeholders Capacity to follow a learning approach to MUS among intermediate level organisations Intermediate level institutions to support communities in operation and maintenance and other support to MUS Enabling environment for implementing and scaling up a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach; principles at intermediate/service provider level Community National Intermediate Flows of information and communication Flows of information and communication Ownership and understanding of MUS and its impact Proper financial models Thorough understanding of poor people’s water-based livelihoods Appropriate technology Effective and inclusive community institutions Sustainable use of available water resources and services Implementing a sustainable, equitable and effective MUS approach for improved livelihoods- principles to be addressed in the different phases of the project cycle at community level Learning: ‘services’ ‘starting with people’
  • 11. !! Unintended MUS late 2000s: • India National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme; 55 million workers; two-third of works are multi-purpose and multiple-source water assets. • Same in Community Work Program?? • Local and Community Driven Development MUS: accountability for high-performing service delivery • New concepts (e.g., accountability triangle) • New upscaling partners
  • 12. Thank you for your attention Further info: MUS Group: www.musgroup.net Barbara van Koppen b.vankoppen@cgiar.org