Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Antimicrobial effect of garlic against E Coli and Stap.A
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Antimicrobial effect of garlic against E Coli and Stap.A

  • 13,873 views
Published

Research work done by my IB student Lim Ju Ann. Please cite and give proper referencing to her on her work if you use this material.

Research work done by my IB student Lim Ju Ann. Please cite and give proper referencing to her on her work if you use this material.

Published in Education , Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
13,873
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
274
Comments
1
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018    EXTENDED ESSAY    BIOLOGY         Optimal Condition for Antimicrobial Activity:    In Vitro study on the effects of temperature and pH on Antimicrobial Activity of Aqueous Garlic Extract  against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923.    Submitted by: Lim Ju Anne  Candidate Number: 002206 – 018   Word Count: 3995 only              Page 1 of 48  
  • 2. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018  Table of Contents  Figures ........................................................................................................................................................... 3 Tables ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 Abstract ......................................................................................................................................................... 6 1.0  Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 7  1.1 Rationale of Study  .............................................................................................................................. 7  . 1.2 Aim ...................................................................................................................................................... 8  1.3 Garlic (Allium Sativum) ........................................................................................................................ 9  1.4 Bacteria ............................................................................................................................................. 11 2.0 Variables  ............................................................................................................................................... 13  . 2.1 Independent variable ........................................................................................................................ 13  2.2 Dependent variable  .......................................................................................................................... 13  . 2.3 Fixed variable .................................................................................................................................... 13 3.0 Procedures ............................................................................................................................................ 14  3.1 Preparation before experiment ........................................................................................................ 14  3.2 Preparation of Aqueous Garlic Extract for different temperature and pH treatment ..................... 15  3.3 Method for Agar Disk Diffusion Method .......................................................................................... 17 4.0  Data Collection ................................................................................................................................. 21  4.1  Raw Data: Antimicrobial Activity of Aqueous Garlic Extract Incubated at Different Temperature . 21  4.2 Raw Data: Antimicrobial Activity of Aqueous Garlic Extract Incubated at Different pH .................. 23  4.3 Data Processing: Comparing Mean Inhibition Zone of E. Coli and Staph. a ..................................... 25  4.4  Data Processing: ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test................................................................................ 26 5.0  Conclusion ........................................................................................................................................ 30  5.1  Part 1: Temperature ......................................................................................................................... 30  5.2  Part 2: pH .......................................................................................................................................... 32 6.0  Evaluation and Suggestion  ............................................................................................................... 34  .7.0  References ........................................................................................................................................ 36 8.0  Appendixes ....................................................................................................................................... 37   Page 2 of 48  
  • 3. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 Figures Figure 1: Generation of Allicin in Garlic Clove (2) ......................................................................................... 9  Figure 3: Cell Wall of Gram‐positive Bacteria (7) ........................................................................................ 11  Figure 2: Cell wall of Gram‐negative Bacteria (10) ..................................................................................... 11  Figure 4: Swabbing direction on the nutrient agar plate ............................................................................ 18  Figure 5: Labelling the Nutrient Agar Plate (left figure: for testing of different incubation pH; right figure: for testing of different incubation temperature) ....................................................................................... 19  Figure 6: Measuring Inhibition Zone of Aqueous garlic Extract Treated at Different pH ........................... 20                Page 3 of 48  
  • 4. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 Tables Table 1: Microcentrifuge labelling and its corresponding temperature  .................................................... 15  . Table 2: Microcentrifuge labelling and its corresponding pH ..................................................................... 17  Table 3: Labelling legend on Nutrient agar plate ........................................................................................ 19  Table 4: Inhibition Zone (mm) of aqueous garlic extract incubated at various temperatures on E. coli ... 21  Table 5: Inhibition Zone (mm) of aqueous garlic extract incubated at various temperatures on Staph. a 22  Table 6: Inhibition Zone (mm) of aqueous garlic extract incubated at various pH on E. coli ..................... 23  Table 7: Inhibition Zone (mm) of aqueous garlic extract incubated at various pH on Staph. a ................. 24  Table 8: Results of ANOVA on 4 sets of data to determine whether there is significant difference between mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different temperature and pH on E. Coli and Staph. a ..................................................................................................................................... 27  Table 9: Results of Tukey’s HSD test on mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different temperature on E. Coli to determine which group is significantly different than the other....... 28  Table 10: Results of Tukey’s HSD test on mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different temperature on Staph. a to determine which group is significantly different than the other ... 28  Table 11: Results of Tukey’s HSD test on mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different pH on E. Coli to determine which group is significantly different than the other ....................... 29  Table 12: Results of Tukey’s HSD test on mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different pH on Staph. a to determine which group is significantly different than the other ................... 29  Table 13: Conventional notations and its meaning .................................................................................... 41  Table 14: One‐way ANOVA table ................................................................................................................ 42  Table 15: Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 43  Table 16: ANOVA table ............................................................................................................................... 43  Table 17: Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 44  Page 4 of 48  
  • 5. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 Table 18: ANOVA table ............................................................................................................................... 44  Table 19: Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 45  Table 20: ANOVA table ............................................................................................................................... 45  Table 21: Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 46  Table 22: ANOVA Table ............................................................................................................................... 46     Page 5 of 48  
  • 6. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 Abstract  Garlic (Allium Sativum) is known to have antimicrobial properties.  This study investigates the effects of pH and temperature on the antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract.  The aqueous garlic extract is tested on non‐pathogenic Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococus aureus ATCC 25923 in an in vitro environment.  The method chosen is Agar Disc Diffusion Method.  Filter paper discs are dipped into the  aqueous  garlic  extract  which  are  pre‐treated  at  different  pH  and  temperature  and  then  put  onto inoculated agar plates.  The agar plates are incubated at approximately 37oC for 24 hours.  The diameter of inhibition zone (clear zone around the filter paper disc) is measured; the larger the diameter of zone of inhibition, the higher the antimicrobial activity of the aqueous garlic extract.  ANOVA (calculated at significance  level  of  0.05)  and  Tukey’s  HSD  test  is  used  to  analyse  the  data.    For  E.  coli  and  Staph.  a, inhibition decreases as incubation temperature of aqueous garlic extract increases; there is no inhibition at  100oC.    Inhibition  is  greatest  for  both  bacteria  strains  when  aqueous  garlic  extract  is  incubated  at room temperature (25oC).  Antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract incubated at 75oC and 80oC is significantly lesser than aqueous garlic extract incubated at 25oC and 40oC.  There is inhibition in Staph. a  and  E.  coli  for  aqueous  garlic  extract  incubated  in  pH  1  and  pH  7  medium.    However,  antimicrobial activity on E. coli is significantly higher when aqueous garlic extract is incubated in pH 1 compared to pH 7.  There is no antimicrobial activity on Staph. a and E. coli when aqueous garlic extract is incubated in medium of pH 12 and pH 14.  The results of my study suggest that optimum incubation temperature for antimicrobial  activity  of  aqueous  garlic  extract  is  between  25oC  to  40oC  and  optimum  pH  is  between acidic (pH 1) to neutral medium (pH 7).  (298 words only)  Page 6 of 48  
  • 7. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 1.0 Introduction 1.1         Rationale of Study    Overuse  of  antibiotics  caused  increasing  antibiotic‐resistant  bacteria;  the  perception  that  antibiotic  is the ultimate cure had pressured physicians into prescribing antibiotics for every infection, even if it is a viral infection.  Not finishing the entire course of antibiotic prescribed leaves behind weakened bacteria in  the  host.    Animals  are  sometimes  given  low  dosage  of  antibiotics  for  long  duration  (to  prevent bacterial infection) to increase the rate of weight gain (1).  The unnecessary administration of antibiotics leaves  weakened  bacteria  which  then  mutate  and  gain  antibiotic  resistant  gene.      Antibiotic  like penicillin1 is ineffective now.   Studies suggest that allicin works by inhibiting certain thiol‐containing enzymes in the microorganisms by rapid reaction of thiosulfinates with thiol groups of the enzyme (2).  It is difficult for bacteria to gain resistance because alteration of enzyme’s structure is not an alternative; according to the lock‐and‐key model,  the  action  of  enzyme  is  specific  because  the  geometric  shape  of  enzyme’s  active  site  and  its substrate  is  complementary.    Alteration  of  enzyme’s  shape  causes  substrate  to  be  unable  to  fit  into enzyme’s active‐site.  The bacteria cannot survive because bio‐chemical enzyme‐catalysed reaction such as respiration cannot be carried out. Lastly,  as  Escherichia  coli  (E.  coli)  and  Staphylococcus  aureus  (Staph.  a)  are  common  bacteria  in  our daily  lives  which  have  the  potential  to  turn  pathogenic  and  garlic  is  a  common  spice  used  in  most culture,  I  feel  that  it  is  worthwhile  studying  the  possibility  of  using  aqueous  garlic  extract  as  natural antibiotic.                                                              1  See Appendix 1  Page 7 of 48  
  • 8. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 1.2  Aim  The  aim  of  my  paper  is  to  study  the  effects  of  pH  and  temperature  on  the  antimicrobial  activity  of aqueous garlic extract.   Hence,  my  research  question  is  Optimal  Condition  for  Antimicrobial  Activity:  In  Vitro  study  on  the effects of temperature and pH on Antimicrobial Activity of Aqueous Garlic Extract against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923.   The  Agar  Disk  Diffusion  Method  is  chosen  for  this  experiment  (3).        This  method  is  adapted2  from Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disks Susceptibility Tests; Approved – Ninth Edition published by Clinical and Laboratory Standards.  I chose this method because of the hydrophilic nature of aqueous garlic extract.  Filter paper discs are impregnated with aqueous garlic extract and placed onto inoculated nutrient  agar.    The  active  ingredient  will  diffuse  through  the  nutrient  agar’s  surface.    No  colonies  will grow near the area where the concentration is equal or more than the effective concentration to kill or inhibit the bacteria.   The size of the clear zone (no bacteria growth) is a measure of the antimicrobial activity.  The larger the diameter of the clear zone, the higher the antimicrobial activity.                                                                   2  See Appendix 2  Page 8 of 48  
  • 9. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 1.3   Garlic (Allium Sativum)  Garlic  (Allium  Sativum)  is  one  of  the  oldest  spices  that  had  been  noted  for  its  medicinal  value  across many  cultures  (Egyptians,  Greeks,  Romans,  Chinese,  Islamic  and  Indians).          For  example,  Herodotus wrote  that  garlic  is  given  to  labourer  building  the  pyramids  to  increase  their  stamina;  Hippocrates thought that garlic is good for many ailments; Mohammed, the prophet claimed garlic applied directly to a sting wound would relieve its pain (4). The earliest documentation garlic’s antimicrobial property of garlic was done by Louis Pasteur in 1858 (4).    Due  to  its  antimicrobial  property,  garlic  poultice  is  used  to  dress  wound  during  World  War  I.    In World War II, the Russian army also turned to garlic when they ran out of penicillin and thus, garlic was named the ‘Russian Penicillin’ (5).   Allicin, produced when crushed, is attributed by many researches to the antimicrobial activity of garlic.  It is  responsible for the typical garlic  odour.   Whole garlic  bulbs contain odourless, sulphur containing amino  acid  derivative  called  alliin  and  an  enzyme  called  allinase.    Alliin  is  contained  in  the  mesophyll cells  while  allinase  in  the  bundle  sheath  cells  of  the  whole  garlic.    When  garlic  is  crushed,  alliin  and allinase will interact (2).  Allinase converts alliin into allicin as illustrated in Figure 1.    Figure 1: Generation of Allicin in Garlic Clove (2)   Page 9 of 48  
  • 10. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 Though,  theoretically,  allicin  is  deemed  responsible  for  garlic’s  antimicrobial  activity,  many  researches show  that  allicin  is  a  volatile  compound  which  decomposes  into  other  sulphurous  compound  such  as diallys sulphide, diallyl disulphide, and ajoene after its formation (6).  Due to ambiguity of information presented, limitation of my knowledge at this level of education and limitation of school lab instrument, I  could  not  possibly  verify  allicin  as  the  compound  responsible  for  garlic’s  antimicrobial  activity.  Therefore, compound responsible for the antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract will be referred collectively as inhibitory components in this study.             Page 10 of 48  
  • 11. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 1.4   Bacteria  I  have  chosen  E.  coli  and  Staph.  a  because  they  represent  the  two  spectrums  of  bacteria:  E.  coli represent  the  gram‐negative  bacteria  while  Staph.  a  represent  the  gram‐positive  bacteria.    This  will therefore  give  a  general  idea  of  the  different  susceptibility  level  of  gram‐positive  and  gram‐negative bacteria towards aqueous garlic extract.                           Figure 2: Cell wall of Gram‐negative Bacteria (10)     Figure 3: Cell Wall of Gram‐positive Bacteria (7)    Page 11 of 48  
  • 12. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 As shown in Figure 2, the outer membrane of the gram‐negative cell wall has a type of protein called porin which controls what enters and leaves the cell – this gives the quality of selective permeability to bile, disinfectants and drugs.  In Figure 3, cell wall of the gram‐positive bacteria has peptidoglycan which contains tightly bound acidic polysaccharides (teichoic acid).  The presence of outer membrane in gram‐negative bacteria provides extra barrier, making it less permeable to antimicrobial substances compared to gram‐positive bacteria.   Therefore,  it is generally easier to inhibit or destroy gram‐positive bacteria due to difference in the cell wall structure(8).               Page 12 of 48  
  • 13. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 2.0  Variables 2.1  Independent variable Aqueous garlic extract is subjected to different temperature using the water bath for 15 minutes.  The temperatures tested are 100oC, 80 oC, 75 oC, 40 oC and room temperature.   0.5  cm3  of  aqueous  garlic  extract  is  added  into  0.5  cm3  either  hydrochloric  acid  or  sodium  hydroxide adjusted to pH 1, pH7, pH12 and pH14 using pH meter (±0.01). 2.2  Dependent variable The  optimal  pH  and  temperature  is  indicated  by  aqueous  garlic  extracts  which  produces  the  largest inhibition  zone  after  being  subjected  to  a  particular  pH  and  temperature.    The  inhibition  zone  is  the diameter  of  the  clear  zone  around  impregnated  filter  paper  disc  on  the  nutrient  agar  plate  after  24 hours of incubation.   2.3  Fixed variable The fixed variables are the amount of bacteria inoculated on the nutrient agar plate; concentration of aqueous garlic extract; concentration, pH (7.2) and volume of nutrient agar used; the duration of filter paper disc being soaked in the extract; diameter of filter paper disc (6mm).      Page 13 of 48  
  • 14. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 3.0  Procedures 3.1 Preparation before experiment 3.1.1 Apparatus preparation   Filter paper discs are cut out with hole puncher of 6mm diameter.  Cheese cloth, mortar and pestle, filter paper discs, forceps, and cotton bud are sterilised using an autoclave.      7g of Gene Chemicals nutrient agar powder is added to 250cm3 of distilled water.  The mixture is heated while stirring until it boils.  Then, it is poured into a glass bottle and sterilised in the pressure cooker.  During sterilization, glass bottle cap is loosened to allow steam to escape and prevent explosion in the pressure cooker.   The  nutrient  agar  solution  is  then  poured  into  90  mm  nutrient  agar  plate3  up  to  7  mm thickness  and  allowed  to  set  on  a  flat  surface.    After  it  had  cooled  down,  the  nutrient  agar  plate  is covered to prevent contamination.   3.1.2   Turbidity standard preparation   McFarland 0.5 standard is prepared by mixing 0.05 cm3 of 0.048 mol of barium chloride (BaCl2) and  9.95  cm3  of  0.18  mol  of  sulphuric  acid  (H2SO4)  (5)  in  a  screw‐cap  tube  used  for  preparing  the bacteria inoculums.                                                                  3  See Appendix 3  Page 14 of 48  
  • 15. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 3.1.3  Inoculum preparation  The bacteria inoculums are prepared by Mr Lawrence Kok4.  The approximate cell density of McFarland 0.5 standard is 1.5 x 108 CFU/mL.  The turbidity of bacteria is visually compared to the standard5 to make sure bacteria turbidity is similar to turbidity of McFarland 0.5 standard. 3.2  Preparation of Aqueous Garlic Extract for different temperature and pH  treatment  3.2.1  Preparation of aqueous garlic extract   100g of garlic is weighed using electronic weighing machine and then pounded into pulp using the  mortar  and  pestle.    Pulp  is  pressed  into  a  beaker  using  two  layers  of  cheese  cloth  to  obtain  the aqueous garlic extract.   3.2.2  Preparing aqueous garlic extract at different temperature  5 microcentrifuges are filled with 1cm3 of aqueous garlic extract using the 1000µL micro pipette.  The microcentrifuges are labelled as shown in table 1.   Microcentrifuge  Temperature     label  (±0.01)oC  1  100.00  2  80.00  3  75.00  4  40.00  5 Room temperature     Table 1: Microcentrifuge labelling and its corresponding temperature                                                              4  See Appendix 4 5  See Appendix 5  Page 15 of 48  
  • 16. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018  As there are only 2 water bath machine in my school lab, I devised other ways to incubate the aqueous  garlic  extract.    To  incubate  in  temperature  100oC,  microcentrifuge  1  is  put  through  a polystyrene piece (which acts as a float)6 in a beaker with boiling water.  Incubation at temperature 80oC and 75oC are done in the water bath machine.  The machine is set  to  the  required  temperature  and  allowed  to  heat  up.    When  the  thermometer  shows  that  the temperature had risen to the required temperature, microcentrifuges 2 and 3 are put into its respective water bath with its float.   As for temperature at 40oC, a hot plate is used to heat up the water in the beaker.  As the heat adjustment  tuner  on  the  heat  plate  does  not  state  the  temperature,  the  desired  water  temperature (40oC)  is  attained  by  adjustment  of  the  heat  adjustment  tuner  through  trial‐and‐error.    The microcentrifuge with its float is put into the water.  The temperature of the aqueous garlic extract is made sure to be at the desired temperature by measuring  the  content  in  microcentrifuge  using  a  temperature  probe  (±0.01)oC  by  Texas  Instrument. Each microcentrifuge is incubated for 15 minutes.  After the microcentrifuges are taken out of its water bath, some coagulated white matter is observed.  Therefore, it is spun in a microcentrifuge at 4000 rpm for 6 minutes to spin down  the residue.   6 filter paper discs are added  into  each microcentrifuge (for triplicates when testing each strain of bacteria) using sterilised forceps and left for 30 minutes.                                                                   6  See Appendix 6  Page 16 of 48  
  • 17. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 3.2.3  Preparing aqueous garlic extract at different pH  4 microcentrifuges are filled with 0.5 cm3 of aqueous garlic extract using the micropipette.  The 4 microcentricuges are labelled as shown in table 2.   Microcentrifuge  pH  label  (±0.01)  6  1  7 7 8  12  9  14   Table 2: Microcentrifuge labelling and its corresponding pH Aqueous solution of pH 1 is prepared by adding distilled water7 to 1 M HCl.  Distilled water is used  to  represent  medium  of  pH  7.    Aqueous  solution  of  pH  12  and  pH  14  are  prepared  by  adding distilled water to 1M NaOH.  pH of aqueous solution is gauged using pH meter(±0.01).  0.5 cm3 of pH 1 HCl, distilled water, pH 12 NaOH, pH 14 NaOH is added into microcentrifuge 6, 7, 8, and 9 respectively using  micropipette.    Content  in  the  microcentrifuge  is  shaken  for  thorough  mixing  and  left  for  15 minutes.    As  some  white  coagulated  matter  is  observed  in  the  microcentrifuge,  it  is  spun  in  the centrifuge at 4000 rpm for 6 minutes to bring the residue to the bottom.  6 filter paper discs are added into  each  microcentrifuge  (for  triplicates  when  testing  each  strain  of  bacteria)  using  sterilised  forceps and left for 30 minutes. 3.3  Method for Agar Disk Diffusion Method  3.3.1  Inoculation of nutrient agar plate  Before  inoculation,  the  working  bench  is  wiped  with  95%  alcohol  and  the  fan  is  turned  off  to prevent contamination.  100µL of nutrient broth containing E. coli is transferred using a micro pipette with clean tip onto the nutrient agar.  A sterile cotton swab is used to swab the surface of nutrient agar                                                             7  See Appendix 7  Page 17 of 48  
  • 18. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 in one direction.  The plate is swabbed twice more, turning the plate 60o every time.  Then, swab around the rim of the agar as shown by figure 4 .          Figure 4: Swabbing direction on the nutrient agar plate This step is repeated with Staph. a.  Each bacteria strain is inoculated in 6 nutrient agar plates (3 plates to be tested for effects of temperature while another 3 plates to be tested for the effects of pH).  Fresh micro  pipette  tips  are  used  for  each  transfer  of  bacteria  onto  nutrient  agar  surface.    The  inoculated nutrient agar plates are left for 5 minutes to dry to ensure an even bacteria lawn growth on the surface.      3.3.2  Application of filter paper discs onto agar plates  When  the  inoculated  nutrient  agar  surface  is  dry,  filter  paper  discs  are  transferred  onto  the nutrient  agar  individually  using  forceps.    The  forceps  is  sterilised  by  dipping  it  into  95%  alcohol  and burning  it  over  the  Bunsen  burner.    The  impregnated  filter  paper  discs  are  taken  out  from  their  Page 18 of 48  
  • 19. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 microcentrifuges.  Any excess liquid on the filter paper disc is dabbed off the wall of the microcentrifuge.  The filter paper disc is then transferred onto their respective position on the agar.                            Figure 5: Labelling the Nutrient Agar Plate (left: for testing of different incubation pH; right: for testing of different  incubation temperature)  Label  Content of filter paper disc  1  Aqueous garlic extract  7  incubated at pH 1, 7, 12  12  and 14 respectively.  14  C1  Aqueous solution of pH 1,  C7  7, 12 and 14 respectively as  C12  negative control.  C14  100  Aqueous garlic extract  80  incubated at 100oC, 80oC,  75  75 oC, 40 oC and 25 oC  40  respectively.  25  C H O  Distilled water as negative  2 control  Antibiotic discs as positive  C  control  Table 3: Labelling legend on Nutrient agar plate   Page 19 of 48  
  • 20. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018   The filter paper discs  are pressed  gently onto the  surface of the  nutrient agar  to  ensure good contact.  The filter paper discs are not relocated once it had been placed because some antimicrobial agents are known to act instantly.  The forceps are sterilised with the same method for transfer of each filter paper disc.   3.3.3  Incubation and Data Collection   The incubator8 is a shelf with two 100W bulbs in a shelf.  After the transfer of filter paper discs onto  nutrient  agar,  all  the  agar  plates  placed  inverted  into  the  incubator.    The  temperature  of  the incubator is adjusted to 37 (± 2) oC.  All agar plates are incubated for 24 hours.  The zone of inhibition is measured with centimetre ruler ((±1.0)mm) as shown in figure 6.  12mm  Figure 6: Measuring Inhibition Zone of Aqueous garlic Extract Treated at Different pH                                                                8  See Appendix 8.  Page 20 of 48  
  • 21. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 4.0  Data Collection 4.1   Raw Data: Antimicrobial Activity of Aqueous Garlic Extract Incubated at  Different Temperature    Substance  Temperature/ oC   Diameter of Inhibition Zone (mm)    tested   (±0.01 oC)  1  2  3  Mean±S.D  Aqueous garlic  100.0  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  extract    80.0  8  7  7  7.3±0.6    75.0  10  9  9  9.3±0.6    40.0  16  15  17  16.0±1.0    25.0 (room  19  16  18  17.7±1.5  temperature)  Distilled Watera  N/A  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐    Nalidixic acidb#  N/A  26  26  26  26.0±0.0    Table 4: Inhibition Zone (mm) of aqueous garlic extract incubated at various temperatures on E. coli  (‐) = no activity (N/A) = not applicable (S.D) = Standard Deviation a Negative control b Positive control #  Disc content: 30µg            Page 21 of 48  
  • 22. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018   Substance  Temperature/ oC   Diameter of Inhibition Zone (mm)    tested   (±0.01 oC)  1  2  3  Mean±S.D  Aqueous garlic  100.0  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  extract    80.0  13  12  12  12.3±0.6    75.0  15  14  16  15.0±1.0    40.0  20  20  19  19.7±0.6    25.0 (room  22  18  17  19.0±2.6  temperature)  Distilled Watera  N/A  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐      Methicillinb#  N/A  17  18  17  17.3±0.6                   Table 5: Inhibition Zone (mm) of aqueous garlic extract incubated at various temperatures on Staph. a  (‐) = no activity (N/A) = not applicable (S.D) = Standard Deviation a Negative control b Positive control #  Disc content: 5µg                            Page 22 of 48  
  • 23. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 4.2  Raw Data: Antimicrobial Activity of Aqueous Garlic Extract Incubated at  Different pH    Substance tested  pH of  Diameter of Inhibition Zone (mm)  medium  1  2  3  mean±S.D  Aqueous garlic extract  1  10  11  10  10.3±0.6  + hydrochloric acid  Aqueous garlic extract  7  12  14  14  13.3±1.2  + distilled water    12  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  Aqueous garlic extract    +   14  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  Sodium Hydroxide    Hydrochloric acida  1  7  8  7  7.3±0.6    Distilled Watera  7  7 8 ‐  7.5±0.7    12  8  8  ‐  8.0±0.0    Sodium Hydrodixea  14  7  7  ‐  7.0±0.0    Nalidixic acidb#  N/A  26  27  26  26.3±0.6    Table 6: Inhibition Zone (mm) of aqueous garlic extract incubated at various pH on E. coli (‐) = no activity (N/A) = not applicable (S.D) = Standard Deviation a Negative control b Positive control #  Disc content: 30µg           Page 23 of 48  
  • 24. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018   Substance tested  pH of  Diameter of Inhibition Zone (mm)  medium  1  2  3  mean±S.D  Aqueous garlic extract  1  20  17  17  18.0±1.7  + hydrochloric acid    Aqueous garlic extract  7  22  18  20  20.0±2.0  + distilled water    12  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  Aqueous garlic extract    +   14  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  Sodium Hydroxide    Hydrochloric acida  1  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐    Distilled Watera  7  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐    12  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  a    Sodium Hydrodixe 14  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐    Methicillinb#  N/A  20  19  19  19.3±0.6    Table 7: Inhibition Zone (mm) of aqueous garlic extract incubated at various pH on Staph. a (‐) = no activity (N/A) = not applicable (S.D) = Standard Deviation a Negative control b Positive control # Disc content: 5µg     Page 24 of 48  
  • 25. Extended Essa Biology  ay – LIM M JU ANNE  002206‐018 4.3  Data Proc cessing: C  Comparin ng Mean In nhibition   Zone of E E. Coli and d Staph. a      Mean In M nhibitio on Zone (mm) o of aqueoous  garlic c extrac ct incubaated at various s  tempe eratures coli and Staph. a s on E. c 25 Mean Inhibition Zone (mm) 20 15 10 E.co oli Staph. A 5 0 100 80 75 40 25 Temperature, oC  Graph 1: M Mean Inhibition Zone (mm) o of aqueous garlic extract incub bated at variou us temperature es on E. coli and d Staph. a    MMean In nhibitio on Zone (mm) o of aqueo ous  arlic extract incubated at vario ga ous pH o on E.  colii and Sta aph. a 25 Mean Inhibition Zone(mm) 20 15 10 E. c coli 5 Sta aph. A 0 1 7 12 14 pH at which aqueous garlic extra act is incubate ed (pH)  Graph 2: M Mean Inhibition Zone (mm) o of aqueous garlic extract incub bated at variou us pH on E. coli and Staph. a   Page 25 of 48 P 8  
  • 26. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 4.4   Data Processing: ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test  Further  data  analysis  is  carried  out  using  Analysis  of  Variance  (ANOVA)  and  Tukey’s  HSD  (honestly significant  difference)  (9).    ANOVA  partitions  the  variance  of  all  observations  into  variations  between group  and  variations  within  each  group.    The  result  of  ANOVA  indicates  whether  the  manipulated variable (pH and temperature) causes significance difference in the antimicrobial activity.  If yes, a post hoc analysis called Tukey’s HSD test is carried out.  Tukey’s HSD test is a multiple comparison test used to  test  the  hypothesis  that  all  possible  pairs  of  means  are  equal.    It  determines  which  group  is significantly different than the others. For ANOVA to be carried out, three assumptions are made:  1. Observations are independent (the value of one observation is not correlated with the value of  another observation).  2. Observations in each group are normally distributed.  3. Homogeneity of variances (variance of each group is equal to that of any other group). The null hypothesis is first assumed – there is no difference between means of different groups.  Then, the statistic test is carried out to find the F ratio.                   If the computed F ratio is greater than the F critical value at the significance level of 0.05 (α=0.05), the null hypothesis is rejected.  There is one group that is significantly different from others.     Page 26 of 48  
  • 27. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 For  Tukey’s  HSD  test,  a  critical  value,  HSD  is  calculated.    If  the  mean  difference  between  groups  is greater than HSD critical value, there is significant difference between these pairs.  The ANOVA is carried out using Microsoft Excel 2007 while Tukey HSD9 is calculated manually.  Below are the results of my tests:   Variable  Bacteria strain  F‐value  F‐critical  Indication  E. Coli  151.73  3.48  ANOVA test on the four sets of data Temperature  shows that there is a group which is  significantly different from others in  Staph. a  109.77  3.38  their own respective set of data.  i.e.: mean inhibition zone of aqueous  garlic extract incubated at a certain  E. Coli  346.87  4.07  temperature or pH is significantly  pH  larger than those incubated at other  Staph. a  207.43  4.07  temperature or pH. Table 8: Results of ANOVA on 4 sets of data to determine whether there is significant difference between mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different temperature and pH on E. Coli and Staph. a                                                                         9  For detailed calculations, see Appendix 9  Page 27 of 48  
  • 28. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 One group is significantly different from the others in their respective set of data, thus Tukey’s HSD test is carried out and the results are as shown in below:   Group Combination, oC  Mean  HSD (Mean Inhibition Zone of aqueous garlic extract  difference,  critical  Implication  incubated at different temperature on E.coli)  mm  value  100  80  7.3 2.40 significant difference 100  75  9.3  2.40  significant difference  100  40  16.0  2.40  significant difference  100  25  17.7  2.40  significant difference  80  75  2.0  2.40  No significant difference  80  40  8.7  2.40  significant difference  80  25  10.3  2.40  significant difference  75  40  6.7  2.40  significant difference  75  25  8.3  2.40  significant difference  40  25  1.7  2.40  No significant difference Table 9: Results of Tukey’s HSD test on mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different temperature on E. Coli to determine which group is significantly different than the other     Group Combination, oC  Mean  HSD (Mean Inhibition Zone of aqueous garlic extract  difference,  critical  Implication incubated at different temperature on Staph. a)  mm  value  100  80  12.33  3.53  significant difference  100  75  15.00  3.53  significant difference  100  40  19.67  3.53  significant difference  100  25  19.00  3.53  significant difference  80  75  3.33  3.53  No significant difference  80  40  7.30  3.53  significant difference  80  25  6.67  3.53  significant difference  75  40  4.67  3.53  significant difference  75  25  4.00  3.53  significant difference  40  25  0.67  3.53  No significant difference Table 10: Results of Tukey’s HSD test on mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different temperature on Staph. a to determine which group is significantly different than the other     Page 28 of 48  
  • 29. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018    Group Combination, pH  Mean  HSD  Implication (Mean Inhibition Zone of aqueous garlic extract  difference,  critical  incubated at different pH on E. Coli)  mm  value  1  7  3.33  1.69  significant difference  1  12  10.33  1.69  significant difference  1  14  10.33  1.69  significant difference  7  12  13.33  1.69  significant difference  7  14  13.33  1.69  significant difference  12  14  0.00  1.69  No significant difference Table 11: Results of Tukey’s HSD test on mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different pH on E. Coli to determine which group is significantly different than the other     Group Combination, pH  Mean  HSD  Implication (Mean Inhibition Zone of aqueous garlic extract  difference,  critical  incubated at different pH on Staph. a)  mm  value  1  7  2.00  3.46  No significant difference  1  12  18.00  3.46  significant difference  1  14  18.00  3.46  significant difference  7  12  20.00  3.46  significant difference  7  14  20.00 3.46 significant difference 12  14  0.00  3.46   No significant difference Table 12: Results of Tukey’s HSD test on mean inhibition zone of aqueous garlic extract incubated at different pH on Staph. a to determine which group is significantly different than the other         Page 29 of 48  
  • 30. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 5.0  Conclusion 5.1   Part 1: Temperature    Graph 1 and 2 shows that Staph. a (gram‐positive) is more susceptible to antimicrobial effects of garlic regardless of how aqueous garlic extract is pre‐treated compared to E. coli (gram‐negative) as the inhibition zone of Staph. a is always larger than E. coli in this study.  However, as this study does not concern the susceptibility of different bacteria, no further analysis is carried out to verify whether there is significant difference between susceptibility of E. coli and Staph. a.  Graph  1  indicates  the  effects  of  temperature  on  the  antimicrobial  activity  of  aqueous  garlic extract on E. coli and Staph. a:   1. Aqueous  garlic  extract  incubated  at  room  temperature,  25  oC  yield  the  highest  antimicrobial  activity while aqueous garlic extract incubated at 100 oC has no antimicrobial activity  2. Antimicrobial  activity  has  an  inverse  relationship  with  the  incubation  temperature  of  aqueous  garlic extract: as temperature decreases from 100 oC to 25 oC, the inhibition zone increases.    The Tukey’s HSD test is used to determine whether the antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract  incubated  at  25  oC  is  significantly  higher  than  being  incubated  at  other  temperature.    All calculations are based on significance  level of 0.05,  α=0.05.   Table 8  and table 9 (involving  E. coli and Staph.  a) show  that there  is  no  significant  difference  between  antimicrobial  activity  of  aqueous  garlic extract  incubated  at  80  oC  and  75  oC.    There  is  also  no  significant  difference  between  antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract incubated at 40 oC and 25 oC.    As aqueous garlic extract incubated at 100  oC does not show any antimicrobial activity, there is significant  difference  in  antimicrobial  activity  when  compared  to  aqueous  garlic  extract  incubated  at  Page 30 of 48  
  • 31. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 other temperatures (80  oC, 75  oC, 40  oC, 25  oC).  This is shown by results in the first four rows in table 8 and 9.    Aqueous  garlic  extract  incubated  at  75  oC  and  80  oC  shows  significantly  lower  antimicrobial activity when compared to aqueous garlic extract incubated at 40 oC and 25 oC.  This is shown by results in  table  8  and  9,  suggesting  that  the  optimum  incubation  temperature  for  aqueous  garlic  extract’s antimicrobial activity is between 40 oC and 25 oC.    Though there is no concrete evidence why aqueous garlic extract loses its antimicrobial activities when incubated at high temperature, there are two plausible explanations.   Increase in temperature increases the kinetic energy of atoms in molecules; atoms vibrate more violently.  If kinetic energy of atoms in molecule overcomes bond enthalpy, bonds between atoms in a molecule  are  broken.    The  3‐D  structure  of  inhibitory  components  is  altered  and  thus  is  rendered dysfunctional.    If  the  inhibitory  component  is  an  enzyme,  it  is  denatured,  i.e.:  loss  of  structure  and function.  Lastly,  it  is  possible  that  the  inhibitory  components  are  volatile  at  high  temperatures.    The increased  in  kinetic  energy  causes  molecules  of  inhibitory  components  to  have  enough  energy  to overcome  the  attractive  forces  between  the  molecules.      Inhibitory  components  become  gaseous molecules and escape into the atmosphere.        Page 31 of 48  
  • 32. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 5.2   Part 2: pH    Graph 2 shows that aqueous garlic extract incubated at pH 7 yields higher antimicrobial activity compared to pH 1 for both E. coli and Staph. a..  Aqueous garlic extract incubated at pH 12 and 14 does not show any antimicrobial activity in both strains of bacteria.     For both strains of bacteria, the results of the Tukey’s HSD test (calculated at significance level of 0.05) in table 10 and 11 show that aqueous garlic extract incubated at pH 1 and pH 7 has significant difference in antimicrobial activity when compared to that of aqueous garlic extract incubated at pH 12 and 14.    Table  10  also  indicates  significant  difference  between  antimicrobial  activity  of  aqueous  garlic extract incubated  at pH  1 and pH  7 on  E. coli.   It  appears that  antimicrobial activity  of  aqueous  garlic extract on E. coli is significantly higher when aqueous garlic extract is incubated at pH 7 compared to pH 1.  However, there is no significant difference between antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract incubated at pH 1 and pH 7 on Staph. a. as indicated in table 11.  Table 5 shows distilled water (control) causes inhibition zone of 7‐8 mm in E. coli. This indicates that random errors (possibly contaminated distilled water) occurred during this part of the experiment because  distilled  water  should  not  show  any  antimicrobial  activity.    Thus,  inhibition  zone  of  7‐8  mm caused by hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide can be disregarded, i.e.: antimicrobial activity on E. coli is solely caused by aqueous garlic extract.  This part of the experiment suggests that the optimum incubation pH for aqueous garlic extract is from pH 1 to pH 7 (acidic to neutral medium).  Page 32 of 48  
  • 33. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018  One  possible  explanation  to  aqueous  garlic  extract’s  lost  of  antimicrobial  activity  when incubated in alkaline solution is that the hydroxide ions (OH‐) may have affected the polar bonds which exist between atoms in molecule of the inhibitory components.  Polar bonds exist between one atom which is partially positive and another which is partially negative.  The OH‐ may have neutralised or alter the bond polarity between atoms, causing bonds between atoms to break.  Broken bonds in a molecule causes structural change of inhibitory components, leading to loss of function.    Lastly,  if  the  formation  of  inhibitory  component  involves  enzymatic  reaction,  loss  of antimicrobial  activity  may  be  due  to  denaturation  of  enzyme.    Enzymes  are  pH  sensitive;  it  functions optimally  at  certain  pH.    Besides  the  breaking  of  bonds  between  atoms  in  an  enzyme  which  causes structural change, OH‐ could affect the polarity of the enzyme’s active site.  OH‐ would get attached to positively  charged  active  site,  preventing  negatively  charged  substrate  from  sitting  on  the  active  site.  Enzymatic reaction cannot take place, causing the loss of antimicrobial activity.             Page 33 of 48  
  • 34. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 6.0  Evaluation and Suggestion  Possible Errors  As  this  experiment  is  very  time  consuming,  I  was  only  able  to  do  three  repetitions  for  each bacteria strain and at the same time control all the fixed variables.  As there are only three repetitions, my results may not be conclusive due to the high possibility of random errors.    Realising  the  possibility of  anomalous  results  due  to  experimental  techniques,  I  have  included positive  control  in  my  experiment.    Nalidixic  acid  (30µg)  and  Methycillin  (5µg)  is  used  as  a  positive control  for  E.  coli  and  Staph.  a  respectively.    According  to  M100‐S2  –  Performance  Standards  for Antimicrobial  Susceptibility  Testing;  Second  International  Supplement,  control  limits  for  inhibitory diameter zones of E. coli and Staph. a when tested with antibiotic discs are 22‐28 mm and 17‐22 mm respectively.  The recorded inhibition zones for Staph. a when tested with methycillin (5µg) is 17‐19 mm while for E. coli when tested with Nalidixic acid (30µg) is 26‐27 mm.  The inhibition zone of both bacteria strain  is  well  within  the  control  limits,  indicating  that  my  methodology  is  valid  despite  possibility  of random error. Limitations   My study only involves one strain of E. coli and Staph. a; thus antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic  extract  on  E.  coli,  Staph.  a,  gram‐positive  and  gram‐negative  bacteria  cannot  be  generalised.  In order  to  generalise  the  antimicrobial  activity  of  differently  pre‐treated  aqueous  garlic  extract  on different bacteria, different strains of E. coli and Staph. a, as well as other common gram‐positive and gram‐negative bacteria should be tested.  Testing aqueous garlic extract with a wider range of bacteria will enable us to establish its status as an antibiotic.  Page 34 of 48  
  • 35. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018   Due to limitation of school lab facilities, aqueous garlic extract was only incubated at 5 different temperatures; thus I could only approximate the temperature at which antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic  extract  decreases.    For  further  investigation,  I  would  incubate  aqueous  garlic  extract  at temperature  ranging  between  80oC  to  100oC  (because  this  study  shows  that  antimicrobial  activity  of aqueous  garlic  extract  starts  to  decrease  when  incubated  at  temperature  greater  than  75  oC)  to determine the exact temperature at which there is no antimicrobial activity. Further Research  It would be interesting to observe how multiple antibiotic resistant strains of E. coli and Staph. a reacts to aqueous garlic extract.  Should the growth of multiple antibiotic resistant E. coli and Staph. a be inhibited, it could lead to discovery of a new generation of antibiotics.   There  is  possibility  of  synergistic  effect  between  aqueous  garlic  extract  and  acidic  food substance such as lime, lemon and vinegar.  Though this study shows lower antimicrobial activity when aqueous  garlic  extract  is  incubated  at  pH  1,  there  is  possibility  of  synergistic  effect  because  acidic medium  is  known  to  be  able  to  kill  bacteria  (just  like  the  acidic  medium  in  the  stomach  which  kills ingested  bacteria).    Besides,  there  is  no  significant  difference  between  antimicrobial  activities  of aqueous garlic extract incubated at pH 1 and pH 7 when tested against Staph. a..       Lastly,  some  unanswered  questions  are  how  exactly  alkaline  solution  (pH)  and  temperature affects  the  antimicrobial  activity  of  aqueous  garlic  extract.    It  is  also  unknown  which  inhibitory component inhibits the bacterial growth.    Page 35 of 48  
  • 36. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 7.0  References  1. Lewis, Ricki. U.S Food and Drug Administration. The Rise of Antibiotic‐Resistant Infection. [Online] September 1995. [Cited: June 27, 2007.] http://www.fda.gov/Fdac/features/795_antibio.html. 2. Ankri, Serge and Mirelman, David. Antimicrobial Properties of Garlic. Microbes and Infection. Elesvier, Paris : s.n., 1999. 3. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disks Susceptibility Tests; Approved Standard ‐ Ninth Edition. Clinical and Labaratory Standards Institute. 2006, pp. M2‐A9. 4. Heinrich, Michael, Pieroni, Michael and Bremner, Paul. Plants as Medicine. [book auth.] Ghillean Prance and Mark Nesbitt. Cultural History of Plants. New York : Routledge, 2005, pp. 219‐221. 5. Schou, Chad. Economic Botany Leaflets. [Online] may 09, 2000. [Cited: February 24, 2008.] http://www.siu.edu/~ebl/leaflets/garlic2.htm. 6. Inhibition of Microbial growth by Ajoene, a Sulphur‐Containing Compound Derived from Garlic. Nagavana, Rie, et al. 11, New York : American Society for Microbiology, 1996, Vol. 62. 0099‐2240. 7. Introduction to Biotic. Antibiotic Attack. [Online] [Cited: December 12, 2007.] http://maflib.mtandao‐afrika.net/TQA01074/english/bio.htm. 8. Talaro, Kathleen Park. An Introduction to Cell and Procaryotic Cell Structure and Function. Foundations in Microbiology: Basic Principles, Sixth Edition. New York : Mc Graw Hill, pp. 99‐101. 9. McGraw‐Hill. ANOVA. [book auth.] Jan W Kuzma and Stephen E Bohnenblust. Basic Statistic for the Health Sciences‐4th edition. Singapore : Mayfield Publishing Company, 2001. 10. Chapter 2 ‐ Cell structure and organization. Microbiology and Bacteriology :: The World of Microbes. [Online] [Cited: December 12, 2007.] http://www.bact.wisc.edu/Microtextbook/index.php?module=Book&func=displaychapter&chap_id=35&theme=printer.        Page 36 of 48  
  • 37. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 8.0  Appendixes  Appendix 1: Excerpt from ‘The Rise of Antibiotic‐Resistant Infection’.   URL: http://www.fda.gov/Fdac/features/795_antibio.html Disease‐causing microbes thwart antibiotics by interfering with their mechanism of action. For example, penicillin kills bacteria by attaching to their cell walls, then destroying a key part of the wall. The wall falls apart, and the bacterium dies. Resistant microbes, however, either alter their cell walls so penicillin cant bind or produce enzymes that dismantle the antibiotic.  In  another  scenario,  erythromycin  attacks  ribosomes,  structures  within  a  cell  that  enable  it  to  make proteins.  Resistant  bacteria  have  slightly  altered  ribosomes  to  which  the  drug  cannot  bind.  The ribosomal route is also how bacteria become resistant to the antibiotics tetracycline, streptomycin and gentamicin.    Appendix 2: Why were the adaptations made Mueller‐Hinton agar was not used in my study because the school lab did not have this particular type of agar at the time of my experiment.  Therefore, I used common nutrient agar from Gene Chemicals.  I believe that this would not be much of a limitation to my experiment because E. Coli and Staph. a are common bacteria; therefore, it is able to survive in most environments.  The nutrient agar from Gene Chemicals  has  a  softer  texture.    Therefore,  the  thickness  of  nutrient  agar  in  this  experiment  is  7mm instead of 4mm; the increased thickness is to compensate for the fragility of the nutrient agar.         Page 37 of 48  
  • 38. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 Appendix 3: Nutrient Agar Plate  90 mm    Appendix 4: Method of Preparing Bacteria Culture from Mr Lawrence Kok Screw‐cap  bottles  that  are  needed  to  contain  bacteria  culture  and  pre‐prepared  nutrient  broth  are sterilized in the autoclave.  Pure Escherichia Coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 is purchased in  dry lypholised  form.   Two  bottles  are filled half‐way with  sterilized nutrient broth.    Pure strains of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 are put into the nutrient broth.  Inoculated nutrient broth is incubated at 37oC for 24 hours.         Page 38 of 48  
  • 39. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 Appendix 5: Comparison of inoculums turbidity with 0.5 McFarland Standard.  0.5 McFarland Standard  Staphylococcus aureus  Escherichia Coli   Appendix 6: Polystyrene as a float in the water bath  Water bath    microcentrifuge  Polystyrene     Page 39 of 48  
  • 40. Extended Essa Biology  ay – LIM M JU ANNE  002206‐018 Appendix 7: How ad djustment of pH can be d done by adding water pH stand ds for Power r for hydroge en.  It is calcu ulated by the e formula be elow:        It is a me easurement of the conce entration of hydrogen ions in a solution.  In order for an acid to show its characte eristics, it has to dissociate in water tto form hydr rogen or hydroxonium ions.  Acid is able to dissociatte in water b because wate er molecule can from hy ydrogen bond ding.  Hydroggen bonding g only happens s when hydro ogen atom is s bonded to highly electr ronegative at toms such as s nitrogen, ooxygen and fluorine.  Then, hydr rogen atom w will be partia ally positive i in the molec cule.  The parrtially positiv ve hydrogen atom in the molecule will be attr racted to lonne pair electrron on the highly electro onegative ato om of another molecule.   When mmore water is s added to a concentrate ed acid, moree hydrogen io ons can dissoociate and th hus lower the pH o of a solution. .  The same a applies when n adjusting the pH of bas sic solution; a adding water to concentrated base a allows more hydroxide io ons to dissociate, thus inc creasing the pH.   Appendix 8: Incubat tion of inoculated plates    The ermometer is u used to make su ure  Heat shie eld – to prevent t over  o tha at the temperat ture is 37±2  C heating th he inoculated p plates  Page 40 of 48 P 8  
  • 41. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 Appendix 9: Detailed Calculation of ANOVA from Microsoft Excel 2007 ANOVA first starts with null hypotheses,  , where mean of groups are hypothesised to be the same.  :   ANOVA partitions the variance of all observations into two sources of variation: variation between the group means and variation within the group means.  The sampling distribution used for testing is called the F distribution (in honour of R. A. Fisher, who developed F statistic).  Between‐group variance measure the treatment effect, which in this study is the antimicrobial effects of aqueous garlic extract when incubated at different temperature and pH.  Below is the conventional notation of ANOVA and its explanation:   NOTATION  MEANING   or    Within‐group variance or  mean square within                                  or    Between‐group variance or  mean square between    Degree of freedom    Number of groups    Number of observation in each group    Total number of observation    Significance level    Sum of squares between group    Sum of squares within group Table 13: Conventional notations and its meaning     Page 41 of 48  
  • 42. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 If the between group variance is greater than the within group variance,  , then there is treatment effect.  If  , then there is no treatment effect.   Test of Hypothesis is performed by comparing the ratio of the two variance estimates,  .   has  1 degree of freedom; labelled as     has   degree of freedom; labelled as  .   Source of  Sum of  Mean  df  F ratio  Critical F*  P value  variation  Squares  Squares,  Between    1    1Within        Computer    ,   generated Total    1   Table 14: One‐way ANOVA table *the critical F value is at significance level of 0.05,  0.05and the value is obtained from the Percentiles of F Distribution table in APPENDIX 10‐A below. There are differences between at least one pair of means when F ratio is greater than critical F.  In order to find out exactly where the differences are, Tukey’s HSD (honestly significant difference) is carried out to make multiple comparisons. The formula for computing  HSD is:  , ,    Where   is obtained from Percentage Points of the Studentized Range for 2 Through 20 treatments table in APPENDIX 10‐B below. There is significant difference between groups of a certain pair if the mean difference between pair is greater than HSD value.     Page 42 of 48  
  • 43. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 For this experiment, I used Microsoft 2007 to generate ANOVA tables.  Below are the tables generated:  1. The effects of temperature on the antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract on inhibition  zone of E. coli.    Groups  (temperature, 0C)  Count  Sum  Average  Variance  Group 1 (100 oC)  3  0  0.00  0.00  Group 2 (80 oC)  3  22  7.33  0.33  Group 3 (75 oC)  3  28  9.33  0.33  Group 4 (40 oC)  3  48 16.00 1.00 Group 5 (25 oC)  3  53  17.67  2.33 Table 15: Summary  Source of Variation  SS  df  MS  F  P‐value  F crit  Between Groups  606.93  4  151.73  189.67  2.2117E‐09  3.48  Within Groups  8.00  10  0.80  Total  614.93  14 Table 16: ANOVA table   0.8 4.65   3 2.40         Page 43 of 48  
  • 44. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018  2. The effects of temperature on the antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract on inhibition  zone of Staph. a.    Groups(temperature, 0C)  Count  Sum  Average  Variance  Column 1 (100 oC)  3  0  0.00  0.00  Column 2 (80 oC)  3  37  12.33  0.33  Column 3 (75 oC)  3  45  15.00  1.00  Column 4 (40 oC)  3  59  19.67  0.33  Column 5 (25 oC)  3  57  19.00  7.00 Table 17: Summary   Source of Variation  SS  df  MS  F  P‐value  F crit  Between Groups  761.07  4  190.27  109.77  3.22E‐08  3.48  Within Groups  17.33  10  1.73  Total  778.40  14 Table 18: ANOVA table   1.73 4.65   3 3.53           Page 44 of 48  
  • 45. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018  3. The effects of pH on the antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract on inhibition zone of E.  coli.    Groups(pH)  Count  Sum  Average  Variance Groups 1 (pH 1)  3  31  10.33  0.33  Groups 2 (pH 7)  3  40  13.33  1.33  Groups 3 (pH 12)  3  0  0.00  0.00  Groups 4 (pH 14)  3  0  0.00  0.00 Table 19: Summary   Source of Variation  SS  df  MS  F  P‐value  F crit  Between Groups  433.58  3  144.53  346.87  8.31E‐09  4.07  Within Groups  3.33  8  0.42  Total  436.92  11 Table 20: ANOVA table   0.42 4.53   3 1.69           Page 45 of 48  
  • 46. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018   4. The effects of pH on the antimicrobial activity of aqueous garlic extract on inhibition zone of  Staph. a.   Groups(pH)  Count  Sum  Average  Variance Group 1 (pH 1)  3  54  18.00  3.00  Group 2 (pH 7)  3  60  20.00  4.00  Group 3 (pH 12)  3  0  0.00  0.00  Group 4 (pH 14)  3  0  0.00  0.00 Table 21: Summary   Source of Variation  SS  df  MS  F  P‐value  F crit  Between Groups  1089.00  3  363.00  207.43  6.35E‐08  4.07  Within Groups  14.00  8  1.75  Total  1103.00  11 Table 22: ANOVA Table   1.75 4.53   3 3.46           Page 46 of 48  
  • 47. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 APPENDIX 10 – A: Percentiles of F Distribution (9)    Page 47 of 48  
  • 48. Extended Essay – Biology  LIM JU ANNE  002206‐018 APPENDIX 10 – B: Points of the Studentized Range for 2 Through 20 treatments (9)    Page 48 of 48