Social Media for Nonprofits
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Social Media for Nonprofits

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  • Barbara, this is a witty presentation and is very clear. I like Slide 12 because it discusses trust, which is the topic of my last presentation Rust without Trust on SS. I wish you would write a presentation exclusively on Social Media Strategy.
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  • Between blog posts on Mashable, Social Media Club and the Society of New Communications Research, 426 people responded to a 30-question survey (commissioned by The Columbus Foundation, The Saint Paul Foundation and The San Francisco Foundation). The analysis of these Social Media power users revealed the group was younger than the traditional composition of donors one would find in a charity’s database. 47% were aged 30-49 40% were under the age of 30 Only 13% were 50 or older Almost two-thirds (62%) were femaleNot surprisingly, those 30 and younger were not a high dollar donor generation: (Only)4% donated $5,000 or greater in 2008 (And) 11 % donated more than $1,000
  • What researchers found in the Social Media for Social Causes Study, was that a tremendous opportunity for nonprofits to participate as trusted providers of credible information and ultimately cultivate the next generation of major donors through the Social Web.In the same year, among those between the ages of 30-49: 20% gave more than $5,000 (And) 41% gave $1,000 or more(Demonstrating the potential for higher dollar contributions)Of the Social Media savvy age 50 and older: 47% gave more than $5,000 (And) 66% gave $1,000 or greaterAs a result, the rest of the analysis focuses on the 30-49 and over 50 age brackets as they represent the greatest opportunity for online cultivation of high dollar donors.
  • Social Media power users of both the new 30-49 age brackets and the over 50 bracket have used Social Media to discuss philanthropy. In fact, 84% of the Social Media savvy aged 30-49 and 55% of those older than 50 used conversational media for these purposes. This confirms Social Media is a potential for growth area through which major donors can be cultivated.
  • The Social Media savvy stated clearly that email is their preferred method of contact from charitable organizations. 77% of those 50 and older and 71% aged 30-49 prefer email. Additionally, 45 % of 30-49 year-olds prefer social networks and 31 % of those over 50 also use social networks. This indicates a growing market for distribution of information via social networks.
  • Trust in social media is significant among social media savvy would-be donors. 61% of those aged 30-49 trust social networks and blogs to provide important information, as is the case with 44% of those 50 years or older. Among 30-49 year olds, social media use is also very high with 91% of users participating in social networks, 81% participating in blogs, and 56% participating in message boards. Among those 50 and older, 94% participate in social networks, 78% participate in blogs, and 60% participate in message boards.
  • Of all the forms of social media used by 30-49-year-olds, only social networks and blogs received greater than 40% rankings for “trust.” Specifically, 66% trust social networks and 50% trust blogs. In the over 50 bracket, 62% trust social networks and 42%trust blogs.Perhaps one of the most interesting points that arose from this data was that both social media savvy groups prefer group social media, with the exception of blogs. Whether for personal use or trust in third party sites, blogs represent the second most viable source of information next to social networks (among both the digital rich and the traditional brackets). After blogs, message boards, forums, wikis and review sites were all deemed more credible than videos or podcasts (the terrain of traditional “personal” social media).
  • Social Media savvy respondents demonstrate a significant opportunity for foundations to provide social media. Among 30-49 year olds: 81% said they would participate if the information was highly credible and of strong quality77% said they would participate if it came from a trusted sourceEven more telling, a whopping 86% of those 50 and older said they would participate if the information was highly credible and of strong quality, and 84% would participate if Social Media came from a trusted source.
  • Privacy was not much of a concern for the 30-49 year olds who said they look for in philanthropic social media
  • The numbers were very similar among the 50 and older bracket
  • Further respondents qualified the type of conversations for which they are looking. Those 30-49 wanted conversation about the following:
  • Among the 50 and older bracket, we see similar types of conversations are wanted:
  • Verifying this opportunity for content sources, 71 percent of 30-49-year-olds directly looked to the charity they support for information, and 63 percent trust referrals from friends. In comparison, 78 percent of those 50 and older directly look to their charities and 72 percent trust friends.
  • In summary, nonprofits and charities have a strong opportunity to engage in meaningful conversations (that may lead to contributions) with the social media savvy (30-49 and >50) – especially those who are uncultivated. Clear indicators reveal types of conversations the Social Media savvy are seeking.Key Findings The online world of charitable activity is highly social, but also fragmented. No dominant voice for charitable giving exists online, indicating the social web is still in an early phase of philanthropic activity. Online conversations rarely evolve into meaningful discussions about how nonprofits are achieving their missions and impacting society. Donors don’t advise other donors, and generally, philanthropic experts from foundations do not participate in these discussions. There is a need for a trusted source, and a lack of authoritative philanthropic conversations. The 30-49 age group represents the best fit to cultivate major donors using social media strategies More than 50 % of 30 – 49-year-old survey respondents are interested in the following topics:• “Whether or not a nonprofit is successfully making an impact” (75%)• “Learning about organizations that are actively working on issues and causes I care about” (62%)• “Success stories and updates on the progress of nonprofits I support” (54%)• “Information/updates on the issues and causes I care about” (54%)• “Financial accountability and governance of nonprofits I support” (51%) 80 % of the Internet-savvy respondents aged 30-49 reported that they would participate in social media with nonprofits if the information was highly credible and of strong quality, and 77 % said they would participate if it came from a trusted source. Online community-oriented social media is a preferred tool over most other forms of online conversation.http://mashable.com/2009/03/26/social-media-nonprofit-study
  • Posting to Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn about what you’re doing, working on, etc.Creating Groups on LinkedIn, Facebook, Google Groups and Yahoo Groups can be very effective in building relationships with volunteers, partners and donors.
  • Gain insights about audiences and issues Spread important ideas and create awareness Share resources and opportunities Build networks and social movements Strengthen trust in your organization
  • For instance, advocacy groups may want to use Social Media to build networks and social movements. Foundations may want to use them to spread ideas and create issue awareness, or share research findings. Other nonprofits may want to use them to learn more about the needs and preferences (or complaints) of the clients they serve. Some nonprofits may want to use them to deepen trusting relationships with their donors.
  • Organizing all this through Google Reader makes it easier for a staff member to keep up with relevant online conversations. Listening is not just a one-time exercise; it should become part of your standard day-to-day operations. That means expressly making time for it (1 hour a day) in someone’s schedule. That person should routinely report significant findings to not only executives, but to all staff members. And you should think about developing a way to make sure that anything negative you hear is addressed!
  • Key Questions: What changes are we trying to make in this world? Who can make those changes happen? What do others need to make the changes you desire happen?Those are your actions…
  • Who is your key audience?What do they think of your organization?Which Social mediums are popular with your target group? Do you need to start tracking Facebook because your audiences are there? Are they Twittering? What blogs do they follow? Are there other online communities they participate in?
  • What research do you need to identify the places and spaces where your target audience are present?What social platforms are your peers and/or competitors using and investing in?Once you’ve identified the who and what, you’ll know you’re on the right track. Remember: It takes time to build the relationship – you can’t rush it.
  • There’s a huge universe of Social Media out there, so don’t get carried away.These are all threads in the same cloth and they need to interweave and reinforce each other. (They also need to reflect that there are human beings behind your logo.) 
  • Usage of the Social Media platforms may be free to use, but they require a sustained investment of staff time to be effective.
  • These statements can help declare and clarify for your employees the cultural shift that participation in Social Media represents—toward more transparency and openness, less control of marketing message, trust-building rather than self-promotion, and more authentic, multi-way engagement with partners and potential supporters.Now, you’re ready to start using Social Media strategically—more confident that your investment of time and energy will actually advance your mission and goals.

Social Media for Nonprofits Social Media for Nonprofits Presentation Transcript

  • Social mediafor nonprofits
    AVACA
    OCTOBER 8, 2009
    BARBARA A. DANIELS, CSMC
  • What is Social Media?
    Social Media is a cross functional – corporate culture related engagement – not a marketing campaign
    Social Media sites, tools and techniques provide a new way to connect with donors, volunteers, prospective donors and partners
    The main objective of any social media engagement should be to create a better customer experience for an organization’s ecosystem
  • Social Media Strategy
    It’s not about the tools… but a holistic understanding of the impact of Social Media to the organization
    Your organization’s profile is key to everything you do in the Social Web – make sure it is complete and makes the right impression
    Having a comprehensive strategy in place removes the fear of managing the Social Web
  • Why Do People Volunteer?
  • Interestingly enough, the needs for the different stages of volunteerism correlate to
     Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs which is a theory that attempts to explain how and why
    people pursue certain actions.
  • 4 Tips to make sure you are fulfilling your volunteer’s needs:
    Listen | Individually meet with / get to know your volunteers. If you don't have time to meet them on your own, make sure to have a small committee of committed volunteers to help. You can call them your Volunteer Relationship Management Team (VRMT)
    Understand | Based on the progression of volunteer needs and Maslow's hierarchy, understand why each individual volunteer has engaged with you and your cause
    Recognize | Give appropriate recognition that is specific for each volunteer. Avoid mass thank you letters, and instead, leveraging your VRMT, thank each volunteer individually in a manner that relates to the need of that volunteer. For example, a "healing" volunteer might look for recognition that they are a part of the "family" while a "helping others heal" volunteer might want confirmation that they are a "real leader"
    Ask | Ask your volunteers to come back. Nothing shows that you valued a volunteer's time more than if you personally ask that volunteer to come back and help again.
  • Social Media for Social Causes Study:
    The Results
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • There’s a Tremendous Opportunityfor Nonprofits in Social Media
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • Donors are using Social Media to discuss philanthropy
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • 77 % of those 50 and older and 71 % aged 30-49 prefer email
    Times are changing though: Currently 45 % of 30-49 year olds prefer social networks and 31 % of those over 50 also use social networks
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • Trust in Social Media is significant among Social Media savvy would-be Donors
    61% of those aged 30-49 trust social networks and blogs to provide important information, as is the case with 44 % of those 50 years or older
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • Group Social Media is preferred over personal efforts
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • Significant Opportunity for Foundations to provide Social Media
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • Privacy not much of a concern for the 30-49 year olds
    81% want information from a highly credible or quality source
    77% from a trusted organization
    59% would like to interact with other donors
    58% want to interact with philanthropic experts
    41% want to lead a public conversation
    36% would like to lead discussions of their own
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • Results not much different among 50+ bracket (privacy)
    86% want information from a highly credible or quality source
    84% from a trusted organization
    56% would like to interact with other donors
    52% want to interact with philanthropic experts
    38% want to lead a public conversation
    32% would like to lead discussions of their own
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • 30-49 year-olds are interested in discussing…
    80% organizational impact
    74% success stories
    71% learning more about the organizations they are participating with
    70% want information on causes they care about
    43% want information on financial accountability
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • 50 and older bracket would like to discuss…(Note: very similar results)
    86% organizational impact
    80% success stories
    80% learning more about the organizations they are participating with
    78% want information on causes they care about
    47% want information on financial accountability
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • Opportunity for Content Sources
    71 % of 30-49-year-olds directly looked to the charity they support for information; and
    63 % trust referrals from friends
    In comparison:
    78 % of those 50 and older directly look to their charities; and
    72 % trust referrals from friends
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • Summary of Results
    Nonprofits and charities have a strong opportunity to engage in meaningful conversations (that may lead to contributions) with the Social Media savvy (30-49 and 50+), especially those who are uncultivated
    Clear indicators reveal types of conversations the Social Media savvy are seeking
    Social Media is all about building relationships and learning to leverage the conversation
    Social Media for Social Causes Study: The Results | March 28, 2009 | by Geoff Livingston
  • How do Nonprofits join in on the conversation?
    Twitter
    Facebook
    LinkedIn
    Groups:
    LinkedIn
    Facebook
    Google
    Yahoo
  • By Using Social Media… Nonprofits Can:
    Gain insights about audiences and issues
    Spread important ideas and create awareness
    Share resources and opportunities
    Build networks and social movements
    Strengthen trust in your organization
  • Step One – The Match Game
    Looking over your communications plan (or your organization’s strategic plan)—identify goals that could be supported by using Social Media in one of the five ways listed on the previous page.
    This little match game should highlight areas that hold the most promise for your social media use. Refine and prioritize these into a set of social media objectives (what do you’d like to accomplish).
  • Step Two: Start By Listening
    Before you start investing in Social Media, listen to what’s already being said about your organization and your issue. Get the “feel” of these media and how people are using them.
    Even if you’ve decided social media isn’t a good investment for you, every nonprofit should at least have a listening outpost. Set up Google alerts for your organization’s name, executives, news release titles, and issue keywords. Research which bloggers are writing about your issues through Technorati or Alltop and subscribe to their blog feeds.
  • Step Three: Who?
    If you have a strategic communications plan you already know who your key audiences are. If you don’t, use your organizational strategic plan and ask these questions:
    What changes are we trying to make in the world?
    Who can make those changes happen?
    Those groups are your key audiences. Be very clear about what they need to do to make the changes you desire happen—those are the actions you’re aiming to trigger through your communications.
  • Step Three: What?
    If you don’t feel that your listening outpost captures your key audiences well enough, enhance it so you can find out more about what these particular groups of people think about your organization and its work. You especially want to find out which social mediums are popular with these folks.
    Do you need to start tracking Facebook because your audiences are there?
    Are they Twittering?
    What blogs do they follow?
    Are there other online communities they participate in?
  • Step Three: Where?
    What kind of research do you need to do to find out where they are congregating online? It might also be helpful to scout out which social mediums your peers and competitors are investing in.
    Once you know who you’re trying to reach, what you want them to do, and what social mediums they’re using—you’re more than halfway home.
    Remember, just developing a deeper relationship with your key audience members can be an “action” goal.
  • Step Four: Putting it in context
    Stick to your objectives and key audiences. Pick out a couple of Social Media platforms that offer the most promise of reaching your key audiences, then focus on going deep with those.
    Once you’ve chosen them, think about the larger picture. How are these Social Media tools going to integrate with your website, email strategy, publications, media relations, and special events? Write down your integration plan, even a starter time line for the next few months.
    Get creative about how you repurpose content in all these media so you’re not reinventing the wheel but still providing valuable content in fresh ways.
  • Step Five: Who does what?
    Now comes the tricky part. Who’s going to be responsible for what? Who’s going to generate the content and when? Who’s going to do the organizational listening? Who’s going to handle IT and legal support if needed? Do you need outside expertise? How are you going to measure ROI? Who’s going to gather that data?
    Are you opting for an organizational voice or are you inviting employees to participate as individuals? How will you handle negative online comments about your organization? What are the budget and staff implications?
  • Are we there yet?
    If you want estimates about how much time Twittering, blogging, managing a Facebook or YouTube page takes—ask one of the nonprofits successfully using these media. From my own experience, listening and Twitter take me about an hour a day, and blogging takes 3-4 hours a week.
    Even with a modest investment in Social Media, you also probably want to create a short user-friendly policy for your organization. Try to keep it in simple-to-understand language.