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Using Your WITS To Deal With Cyberbullying
 

Using Your WITS To Deal With Cyberbullying

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This presentation reviews the elements of the WITS Programs and examines the issue of cyberbullying.

This presentation reviews the elements of the WITS Programs and examines the issue of cyberbullying.

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  • Introduction of Brett, myself.Questions to ask: 1. Experience in working with youth 2. Experience in working/teaching in the classroom
  • Pose the question to the audience and generate answers
  • This is especially important in clearly communicating this with parents who may need clarification on the definition.
  • Intervention programs include BC’s Provincial ERASE Bullying strategy. The program usually involves a reporting mechanism for children to report an incident.
  • This approach deals with the issues before they happen. Opening conversations, dialogue and learning experiences to explore the issue and determine best strategies to minimize occurrence.
  • Intentionally simple.
  • Peer victimization is more objective language to describe people hurting people – without the labels.
  • Aimed at elementary schools in order to build a set of skills that they can use for the rest of their life.
  • Source from Pam
  • Pose the question to the audience
  • In Slide: “Today, bullying doesn’t even end at the school bell – it can follow our children from the hallways to their cell phones to their computer screens… We have got to make sure our young people know that if they’re in trouble, there are caring adults who can help them” (U.S. President, Barack Obama) OR“What makes cyber bullying so dangerous is that anyone can practice it without having to confront the victim. You don’t have to be strong or fast, simply equipped with a cell phone or computer and a willingness to terrorize” (King, 2006)I think we should include at least one of these quotes. What do you think?Possible video clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6r-D-GGaM0Differentiated from traditional bullying:Technology, anonymity (potential), accessibility (difficult to escape abuse – 24/7)NOTES:Increasing access and use of technology  concerns over cyber bullyingPew Internet and American Life Project (2010)Majority of teens (12-17) spent time online 36% go online multiple times a day 75% had their own cell phone, 1/3 send 100 texts a day! Texting more common instant messaging currently- Social networking sites very popular among youth, particularly FacebookMore than 800 million active usersPeople spend over 700 billion minutes a month on Facebook (across all users)
  • In Slide: “Today, bullying doesn’t even end at the school bell – it can follow our children from the hallways to their cell phones to their computer screens… We have got to make sure our young people know that if they’re in trouble, there are caring adults who can help them” (U.S. President, Barack Obama) OR“What makes cyber bullying so dangerous is that anyone can practice it without having to confront the victim. You don’t have to be strong or fast, simply equipped with a cell phone or computer and a willingness to terrorize” (King, 2006)I think we should include at least one of these quotes. What do you think?Possible video clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6r-D-GGaM0Differentiated from traditional bullying:Technology, anonymity (potential), accessibility (difficult to escape abuse – 24/7)NOTES:Increasing access and use of technology  concerns over cyber bullyingPew Internet and American Life Project (2010)Majority of teens (12-17) spent time online 36% go online multiple times a day 75% had their own cell phone, 1/3 send 100 texts a day! Texting more common instant messaging currently- Social networking sites very popular among youth, particularly FacebookMore than 800 million active usersPeople spend over 700 billion minutes a month on Facebook (across all users)
  • - IN SLIDE:Willard (2006) Types of Cyber Bullying:1) Flaming2) Harassment3) Denigration4) Impersonation5) Outing and trickery6) Exclusion7) Cyber stalkingAdditional types (Kowalski et al., 2012)1) Happy slapping2) SextingNOTES:Can be done through a variety of mediums (chat rooms, social networking, email, text messaging)
  • - IN SLIDE:Willard (2006) Types of Cyber Bullying:1) Flaming2) Harassment3) Denigration4) Impersonation5) Outing and trickery6) Exclusion7) Cyber stalkingAdditional types (Kowalski et al., 2012)1) Happy slapping2) SextingNOTES:Can be done through a variety of mediums (chat rooms, social networking, email, text messaging)
  • NOTES:- Cyclical relationships – victims  bullies and vice versa - Potentially large numbers of bystanders online
  • NOTES:“THINK BEFORE YOU TYPE!”Don’t have to witness victim’s reactionCan say things they wouldn’t normally say in person Lack of empathy
  • Combine this quote in the previous slide?
  • - I will discuss these when I discuss how cyber bullying is different than traditional bullying  I can re-iterate the key points here
  • Telling someone about it  not always effective because individuals informed do not know how to help them A 3rd common response is confronting the bully or trying to get revenge (REACTIVE response)
  • NOTES:- Other aspects of bystander behavior important to consider  my research … perceptions of the victim
  • Pose this question to the audience. Small group discussion- then large group discussion
  • Small group discussion – large group discussion
  • Small group discussion – large group discussion
  • Tour each of these websites. Take a more extensive tour of the WITS site includingFYI-Spotting The SignsLessons -ConnectED -Grade 5-Cyberbullying and harassmentEnd with the Cyberbullying Poster
  • Pose this to the audience to discuss in small groups.Emphasize the escalating stop measure. Stop does not just mean turn of the device it may mean - deactivating online accounts - changing your phone number - stop the social engagement and look for alternate healthier social experiences
  • As part of using the equipment children should understand how to record any interaction that may be deemed hurtful or unsafe. As teachers what is necessary in order to record interactions. - screenshots - copies of audio - an understanding that all browser history is to be recorded
  • Understanding how tools work to ensure safety. - filters - report mechanismsFacebook blocks https://www.facebook.com/help/116326365118751#Que-faire-en-cas-d%27attaque-sur-FacebookInstagram Blocks http://help.instagram.com/426700567389543
  • Often texting and posting escalates to a point of hurting someone. How to diffuse situations before a pattern of hurtful communication develops.
  • Last slide
  • - First reported case of cyber bullying: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFsfDLCkfQU- Another possible clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rALek3hI_0s

Using Your WITS To Deal With Cyberbullying Using Your WITS To Deal With Cyberbullying Presentation Transcript

  • OUTLINE The WITS Program What is Bullying What is Cyberbullying Instructional Approaches Resources
  • Pam Allyn – Huffington Post
  • CYBERBULLYING “Today, bullying doesn’t even end at the school bell – it can follow our children from the hallways to their cell phones to their computer screens… We have got to make sure our young people know that if they’re in trouble, there are caring adults who can help them” (U.S. President, BarackObama)
  • Flaming Harassment Denigration Impersonation Outing and trickery Exclusion Cyber stalking Willard 2006 FORMS OF CYBERBULLYING - Happy slapping - SextingKowalski et al., 2012
  • “When people use technology, there is a lack of tangible feedback about the consequences of actions on others.” Nancy Willard
  • [With] the Internet, you can really get away with a lot more because I don't think a lot of people would have enough confidence to walk up to someone and be like, “I hate you, you're ugly.” But over the Internet you don't really see their face or they don't see yours and you don't have to look in their eyes and see they're hurt. Student Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Talking to Youth and Parents about Life Online “What makes cyber bullying so dangerous is that anyone can practice it without having to confront the victim. You don’t have to be strong or fast, simply equipped with a cell phone or computer and a willingness to terrorize” (King, 2006)
  • • perpetrator may be anonymous • if anonymous targets do not know who among their peers to “watch out” for or respond to • there is no safe “place” Could feel more threatened than in a face to face encounter
  • Passive response The victim, deletes or ignores an aggressive message as an attempt to avoid cyberbullying and hopes that it will just go away. Two Common Responses
  • Active Response Responds to the situation in a way that may be more successful in leading to resolution. Two Common Responses
  • Bystanders 9% became involved in the bullying behaviour 32% watched but didn’t participate 14% voiced their objection to the person doing the bullying 21% tried to stop the bully 11% left the online environment 7% tried to befriend the bully, and 7% reported the bully to someone who could help.[3] In general, the longer the bullying persists, the more likely it is that the number of witnesses who are willing to join in will increase. N. Willard, "Fostering Responsible Online Behaviour (Part 1)." For The Cybercitizen Awareness Program: Guidance Channel Ezine, June 2007.
  • BC Digital Literacy Competencies Research and Information Literacy Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Digital Citizenship Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Communication and Collaboration Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Technology Operations and Concepts Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
  • BC Ministry of Education
  • Safe digital communication– RCMP Lessons and Activities Identify The Line A Thin Line Where to draw the line? That’s Not Cool WITS Website Cyberbullying Resources
  • There is no silver bullet
  • There is no one-size-fits-all solution for providing children with every aspect of online child safety. It takes a comprehensive “toolbox” from which parents, educators and other safety providers can choose tools appropriate to children’s developmental stages and life circumstances. Any solution to online safety must be holistic in nature and multi-dimensional in breadth. Youth Safety On The Living Internet, 2010
  • More information: witsprograms.ca fb.me/witsprograms @witsprograms pinterest.com/witsprograms/