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Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
Myths of reading non fiction text pp
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Myths of reading non fiction text pp

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  • 1. Grade 7 Social Studies
  • 2. Statement #1 There is no difference between reading fiction and non-fiction.
  • 3. SO FALSE  More difficult than fiction  Different text features and structure  Different reading strategies  How does a text book look different?  Use bold, italics, vocabulary lists, key words, boxes, pictures, graphic organizers  Read with a purpose  What questions are you trying to answer?  Reading fiction is like watching a movie.  Nonfiction is more like a newscast or watching a slide show.
  • 4. Statement #2 When reading a text book, you have to read every single word.
  • 5. SO FALSE  Non-fiction reading is reading to learn something.  What do you want to learn?  Use text features to distinguish important from unimportant information  Look for key ideas  Skim and scan  Read quickly to get general idea (skim) and look for one thing in particular (scan)
  • 6. Statement #3 Never skip passages when reading non-fiction books.
  • 7. SO FALSE  Skim titles, key words, bold-faced words  Skim picture captions, boxes highlighed main points  Scan timelines, graphs, charts  Skim introductions and headings to get clues about main ideas  Know what information you are looking for!
  • 8. Statement #4 Reading something once is enough.
  • 9. SO FALSE  Usually once = not enough  Skim once quickly to determine main idea of passage  Identify parts need more careful reading  Re-read only those sections  Good reading is selective reading!  What am I looking for?  What sections are relevant?
  • 10. Statement #5 If you skim or read too quickly, your reading comprehension will decrease.
  • 11. SO FALSE  Harvard Report: experiment, Dr. Perry (psychologist), Director of the Harvard Reading- Study Center  1500 1st year students  30-page chapter from a history book to read  20 min. and write essay on what they had read  Only 15 students could write short statement about what they had read  Why?  Only 15 skimmed and got to the end to read the part marked “summary”  Ask yourself what information you need to get out of a reading assignment, then look for those points.
  • 12. Statement #6 The faster you read, the less you understand.
  • 13. SO TRUE  Research shows no connection between reading speed and comprehension  Reading comprehension depends on your ability identify important information  Focus on purpose for reading (e.g.: locate important main ideas and details)  Research shows that reading quickly can also increase comprehension
  • 14. TRY THIS Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht frist and lsat tteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by itslef but the wrod as a wlohe.
  • 15. Moral of the Story  Reading non-fiction requires different skills  Good readers read with a purpose  Know what you are looking for  Good reader locate information  Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information  Identify main ideas and supporting details  Use non-fiction text features

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