Pidgins and its origion

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The origin of pidgin and how it becomes creoles

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Pidgins and its origion

  1. 1. Yogesh Bhatt 151/2013
  2. 2. What Pidgin is ? Varieties of Pidgin Expanded Pidgin Characteristics of Pidgin
  3. 3. WHAT IS A PIDGIN A pidgin or pidgin language, is a simplified language that develops as a means of communication between two or more groups that do not have a language in common. It is most commonly employed in situations such as trade, or where both groups speak languages different from the language of the country in which they reside (but where there is no common language between the groups).
  4. 4. WHAT IS A PIDGIN According to Peter Trudgill .. “Pidgin is a term used to apply to situations where two or more groups of speakers who do not have a native language in common are in social contact with one another or come into such contact.”
  5. 5. ETYMOLOGY
  6. 6. CHARACTERISTICS  Developed from two language as a result of reduction, simplification of „input material, internal innovation, and regularization of structure.  Language so formed is different from its antecedent languages, but some vocabulary is taken from native languages.  is nobody's mother tongue, and it is not a real language at all so do not have native speakers.  It has no elaborate grammar.  Limited functions (esp. trade)
  7. 7. EXPANDED PIDGIN  Pidgins usually have limited life-span; can die out when the interactions that they serve end (e.g., the end of a trade route)  Pidgins will survive longer if at least two substratum language groups are involved. E.g. Non-European language groups not in frequent contact with each other until arrival of trans-oceanic trade will continue to use the Pidgin created.
  8. 8. EXPANDED PIDGINS So the pidgin becomes a link language among the non-Europeans, who sometimes continue to develop and use it after the Europeans have left in many West African countries and South Pacific islands. So it can become an expanded pidgin, like the Nigerian pidgin Genesis, and remain in wide use. Grammar and vocabulary expand as types of interaction become broader and more complex. But still no native speakers…..
  9. 9. EXPANDED PIDGINS What happens when they have children? What language will the children speak? The children will be native speakers of the pidgin, and they will grow up with other children having similar language backgrounds. As they grow up and become involved in broad range of activities (education, music, religion), their language becomes more complex in terms of grammar, vocabulary, and discourse.
  10. 10. EXPANDED PIDGINS The pidgin has now developed into a Creole, which is “the mother tongue of a community.” Creoles can become dominant languages of communities and even post-colonial nations e.g., Jamaica, Haiti
  11. 11. VARIETIES OF PIDGINS Chinglish  Chinese Pidgin English  Originated as lingua franca for trade between British and Chinese people.  1839 – began to decline in the late 19s
  12. 12. VARIETIES OF PIDGINS  Maroon Spirit Language (Jamaica, West Africa, )  West African Pidgin (West Africa, Equatorial Guinea, Sierra Leone )  African Pidgin  Cameroon Pidgin English  Tok Pisin (Papua New Guinea)
  13. 13. HAWAIIAN PIDGIN HISTORY OF China, Portugal, Japan, the Philippines, Korea, and many other nations develop on plantations in the 19th Centaury
  14. 14. EXPANDED PIDGINS From 1878-1888, many English-medium schools were built, and as more labourers„ children attended these schools year after year, the language of plantations more influenced by English, The pidgin shifted from Pidgin Hawaiian to Pidgin English. During this time, the vast majority of the population was at least bilingual, for they used Pidgin English on plantations and in interethnic interactions, and they spoke ethnic languages such as Hawaiian, Cantonese, Japanese, Okinawan, Tagalog, and Portuguese in their homes and in ethnically-
  15. 15. HAWAIIAN PIDGIN
  16. 16. HAWAIIAN PIDGIN
  17. 17. EXPANDED PIDGINS Early 20th century, when the second generation of locally born speakers emerged and became equal in number to the foreign-born population. Use of Pidgin English also increased as a result of the high numbers of locally born Japanese who began to attend public schools in the early 1900s. It was likely easier for Hawaiian, Chinese, and Portuguese speakers in schools to communicate in Pidgin English with Japanese than to acquire another language. and as these children grew older, the language developed into the Creole that linguists have labeled
  18. 18. CONCLUSION  simplified language that develops as a means of communication between two or more groups that do not have a language in common.  Language so formed is different from its antecedent languages  is nobody's mother tongue, and it is not a real language at all so do not have native speakers.  It has no elaborate grammar.  Limited functions (esp. trade)
  19. 19. Thank you

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