Common core state standards

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Presentation made by Maureen, Newington High School. Gives a clear and concise overview of what educators and librarians can expect from Common Core State Standards.

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  • What are the Common Core State Standards? Internationally benchmarked standards that were developed by States led by Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governor’s Association Center for Best Practices (NGA). They are based on college and career readiness and k- 12 learning progressions. They were developed with multiple rounds of feedback from states, teachers, researchers, higher education and general public. Evidence and research based standards that are aligned with college and work expectations and build upon the strengths of current state standards. 46 states have adopted them. Narrow the gap between high school and what is needed to be successful in college and careers. They are Internationally benchmarked so that all students are prepared to compete and succeed in our global economy and society. There is a definite focus on rigor and relevance. Two Areas – English Language Arts /Literacy and Mathematics. I will focus on ELA/Literacy.
  • The first major shift is in the balance between literature and informational texts. In grades k-5 80% of reading has been literature-based at the expense of social studies and science. The common core requires a 50-50 balance between literature and informational text at this level.
  • This shift reflects the belief that reading and writing instruction is NOT just the responsibility of the English teacher or the language arts teacher. All teachers are responsible for reading and writing in their content area. This also acknowledges that there are content specific skills and strategies essential to effective literacy as texts and content become increasingly more complex.
  • In addition, as students progress through the grades, the ratio of informational/explanatory text to literary text continues to increase. By grade 8 only 45% of what students read should be literary text and by high school the ratio should be 70-755 informational. Teachers of high school English must find the ideal combination of literary texts (drama, poetry, fiction and essays, etc) and their colleagues must bear the lion’s share of the informational text instruction and experiences.
  • To combat the decline in reading scores among American students the standards include an emphasis on engaging students with texts that are appropriately complex and on using on grade level texts for whole group instruction.
  • There are 3 criteria for measuring text complexity: Qualitative evaluation, quantitative evaluation and reader and task matching.
  • The first major shift is in the balance between literature and informational texts. In grades k-5 80% of reading has been literature-based at the expense of social studies and science. The common core requires a 50-50 balance between literature and informational text at this level.----- Meeting Notes (12/11/12 17:03) -----fix text here
  • The standards include appendices that give examples of appropriate text complexity at various levels. It is important to note that these lists are NOT mandatory reading lists, but rather examples.
  • The fourth shift is focused on leveling the instructional playing field for all students by taking a look at instructional practice. When we use questioning techniques that allow for answers to questions based on experiential, cultural or economic background, we are setting up students who do not have these backgrounds for failure. By using text-dependent questions we ensure that students are on a level field and we ensure that students are developing the reading skills by requiring that text must be read in order to answer the questions –
  • The 5th shift is writing for the real world, both work and academic rather than the heavy emphasis on developing narrative writing skills that has been our practice.
  • You can see that this ties into the reading and questioning shift that makes instruction more text-dependent.
  • The 6th shift is to institute a focus on building general academic vocabulary. Students will benefit from reading informational texts beginning in elementary school and by reading age-appropriate content in ss, sci. and tech. subjects. Students capacity for comprehension will increase with the broad breadth of vocabulary knowledge.
  • The standards are organized into 3 strands. The first is K-12 standards that are further broken down into 3 areas: k-5 content, 6-12 content and 6-12 literacy. The second is the Grade specific standards and the third is the CCR Anchors that run throughout the standards.
  • The k-12 standards are organized into 3 sections. K-5 and 6-12 content –that is delivered in the English/Language arts area and a 6-12 literacy sections that is integrated into social studies, science and technical subjects
  • The k-12 content (English Language Arts) – is organized by 4 strands that are integrated.
  • The 6-12 literacy in social studies, science & technical subjects is organized into 2 strands reading and writing. These skills are integrated into the curriculum in these areas and stress the importance of these skills in the subject areas. Also stresses that every teacher is a teacher of reading and writing in their particular discipline.
  • In all areas research and media literacy are integrated. There are a number of short and long research experiences that are used to develop the skills of reading critically and writing argumentative and informative/explanatory texts. In addition, skill in accessing, understanding, using and creating information and products in a variety of formats and media as well as communicating to a variety of audiences is included.
  • For ex. Writing strand 7 and 8 integrates long and short research including advanced search techniques, self-generated research questions, evaluating informations, using multiple sources and formats.
  • Skills and concepts for end of year, grade specific expectations for standards are reinforced and expanded as students progress through the grades. The result is a spiral effect where students practice skills and concepts mastered from the prior year and add new more complex ones.
  • CCR- College and Career readiness anchors are the framework that the standards are scaffolded on. (k-12 content strands: reading, writing, listening 7 speaking, language)
  • Ex. Of CCR anchor standards for reading
  • Here’s another look at the organization all together.
  • Maintaining collections that include a variety of formats including eBooks, databases and print resources at all levels to support shorter research assignments as well as longer research projects. An emphasis on informational texts, primary sources and original historical documents in their original language should help guide collection development. Increase resources for k-5 in the area of informational text. Be sure that collections include resources at appropriate levels of text complexity for major units of study at each grade level or grade band. Use the Common Core Standards appendices for examples of appropriately complex text by grade level.
  • The new standards embed research, media and technology skills and concepts in a number of strands. The use of digital tools for creation, production and communication are embedded as well. In addition, the writing and speaking and listening strands include developing skills in the ability to contribute and demonstrate leadership in collaborative groups as well as communicate information to a variety of audiences including global audiences.
  • Common core state standards

    1. 1. Understanding Maureen Plourd, LMS Newington High School
    2. 2. ELA/Literacy Standards• Overview• Six major shifts in thinking• Organization of standards• How can libraries support the standards?
    3. 3. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1 Gr. k–5
    4. 4. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  Gr. 6-12 Literacy Education  Reading & writing in subject areas  Social studies  Science  Technical subjects
    5. 5. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  Gr. 6-12 English/Language Arts  Not just novels  Short texts/close reading
    6. 6. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  Gr. 6-12
    7. 7. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  All Students Appropriately complex texts  grade bands  whole group instruction must use “on grade level text”
    8. 8. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  Gr. k-5
    9. 9. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1
    10. 10. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  Gr. 6-12
    11. 11. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1
    12. 12. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  All Students Questioning  Based on text  Let the text teach
    13. 13. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  All Students Writing  To inform  To make an argument  Always with evidence (text)
    14. 14. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  All Students Writing  Personal narratives are not real- world useful  Personal connection doesn’t require evidence from text
    15. 15. ELA/LiteracyStandards Shift 1  All Students Academic Vocabulary • word meaning & nuances • General academic vocabulary • Domain-specific words & phrases
    16. 16. Organization K-12 Standards Grade Specific Standards CCR Anchors 6-12 K-5 6-12 literacy content content Defines college & End of year expectations workplace literacyReading Reading Correspond to 4 k-4 K-8 organized by gradeWriting Writing content strandsSpeaking & listening Identical across all 9-12 2 year bandsLanguage grades & content(research & mediaembedded)
    17. 17. Design Organization 1. 3 Sections K-12 6-12 K-5 6-12standards Literacy Content Content Ss, sci., t English English echnical
    18. 18. Design Organization • Reading (foundational skills k-5) K-12 • Writing content • Speaking & Listening strands • Language
    19. 19. Design Organization • Reading 6-12 literacy • Writing strands
    20. 20. Integration Organization Integrated model research of literacy media
    21. 21. Design Organization 2. Define end-of- year Correspond to CCR expectations Grade anchors specific K-8 gradestandards levels; 9-12 two year bands
    22. 22. Design Organization Define literacy for college and 3. workforce CCRAnchors Correspond to 4 k- 12 content strands Identical across all grades and content areas
    23. 23. Organization K-12 Standards Grade Specific Standards CCR Anchors 6-12 K-5 6-12 literacy content content Defines college & End of year expectations workplace literacyReading Reading Correspond to 4 k-4 K-8 organized by gradeWriting Writing content strandsSpeaking & listening Identical across all 9-12 2 year bandsLanguage grades & content(research & mediaembedded)
    24. 24. Libraries & Media Supporting the StandardsCenters Informational text Collections Print & digital Text complexity
    25. 25. Libraries & Media Supporting the StandardsCenters Information literacy Web 2.0 Collaboration Services
    26. 26. "About the Standards." Common Core State Standards Initiative. National Governors Association; Council of Chief State School Officers, 2012. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.Alberti, Sandra. "Common Core Standards: Connecticuts Vision." Connecticut’s Vision for Implementing the Common Core State Standards. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Cromwell. 26 Sept. 2011. SERC. State Education Resource Center, 2011. Web. 10 Dec. 2012.Hamilton, Buffy. Leveraging the Discourse of Common Core Standards to Spur Conversations for Student Learning and School Libraries. GLMA Summer Institute Common Core Presentation 2012. Slideshare, 14 June 2012. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.Peery, Angela B. Navigating the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards. Englewood, CO: Lead + Learn, 2011. Print.

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