Ma Rs And Drug Distrubution Systems
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Ma Rs And Drug Distrubution Systems

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Ma Rs And Drug Distrubution Systems Ma Rs And Drug Distrubution Systems Presentation Transcript

  • Calculate with Confidence 5 th edition Gray Morris Mosby items and derived items © 2010 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
  • Medication Administration Records and Drug Distribution Systems Unit Three: Chapter 12 Mosby items and derived items © 2010 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
  • MARs and Distribution Systems: Objectives
    • After reviewing this chapter, you should be
    • able to:
    • Identify the necessary information that must be transcribed to a Medication Administration Record (MAR)
    • Read an MAR and identify medications that are given on a routine basis, including the name of the medication, the dosage, the route, and the time
  • MARs and Distribution Systems: Objectives (cont’d)
    • Transcribe medication orders to a MAR
    • Identify various drug distribution systems
  • Documentation: 6 th “Right”
    • SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS to avoid errors:
    • TRANSCRIBE CAREFULLY
    • Document AFTER med administration
    • Document accurately
    • Document legibly
    • Document timely
    • MAR is a legal record
    • MAR is verified against orders daily
  • Essential Information on a MAR
    • Client information
      • Name, DOB, medical record #, ALLERGIES
    • Dates (when written, start and stop)
    • Medication information
    • Time of administration
    • Initials (transcriber, person giving med)
    • Special instructions
      • Data such as BP, “Hold if…,” etc.
    • Legends—describe abbreviations
  • Documentation of Meds Administered
    • Complete schedule written
    • Initialed in appropriate area by giver
    • One-time doses
    • PRN doses (may be a different record)
    • Refused or held meds (special symbols)
  • Figure 12-2 Transcription of medication orders to a medication administration record. (Used with permission of St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, New York.)
  • Figure 12-2 Transcription of medication orders to a medication administration record. (Used with permission of St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, New York.)
  • Figure 12-2 Transcription of medication orders to a medication administration record. (Used with permission of St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, New York.)
  • Use of Computers
    • Handwritten transcription and documentation are among most common causes of med errors
    • Goal
      • Elimination of errors
      • Electronic record keeping
    • Systems utilize
      • CPOE (computer prescriber order entry)
      • Electronic MAR
  • Medication Distribution Systems
    • Unit Dose
      • Prepared daily and sent to unit
      • Not available for all products
    • Computer-Controlled Dispensing
      • Automated dispensing system (ADS)—60% of hospitals
      • Detailed transaction records
      • Linked to pharmacy dispensing system
    • Bar-Code Medication Delivery
      • Studies show errors reduced by 65%-86%
  • Figure 12-3 Unit-dose cabinet. (From Clayton BD, Stock YN, Harroun RD: Basic pharmacology for nurses, ed. 14, St. Louis, 2007, Mosby.) Figure 12-4 Pyxis Med Station. (From Clayton BD, Stock YN, Harroun RD: Basic pharmacology for nurses, ed. 14, St. Louis, 2007, Mosby.)
  • Figure 12-5 Bar code for unit drug dose. (From Kee JL, Marshall SM: Clinical calculations: with applications to general and specialty areas, ed. 6, St. Louis, 2009, Saunders.) Figure 12-6 Bar-code reader. (From Kee JL, Marshall SM: Clinical calculations: with applications to general and specialty areas, ed. 6, St. Louis, 2009, Saunders.)
  • Advantages and Disadvantages of Technology
    • Advantages
      • Improves accuracy and efficiency
      • Safeguards the 6 rights (especially Bar-Code)
      • Records can be readily accessed
    • Disadvantages
      • Human component in use of system
      • Human component in relying solely on system
      • Requires extensive up-front design and use planning
  • Scheduling Times (Table 12-1)