Community Based Tourism in Port Renfrew  <br />Rebecca Wilson-Mah<br />Royal Roads University Learning Session<br /> Augus...
 Learning Objectives<br />This session will examine ways in which community based tourism principles and practice can supp...
The Butler Sequence (1980)<br />Butler, R.W. 1980.  The concept of a tourism area cycle of evolution: Implications for man...
Some Key Principles for Community Based Tourism Development<br />Sustainability<br />Diversification<br />Shared Benefits ...
Sustainability is related to the quality of life in a community -- whether the economic, social and environmental systems ...
Principle 2: Community Based Tourism is a Diversification Tool<br />Tourism should be a diversification tool, not a substi...
Principle 3: Community Based Tourism is about Shared Benefits and Control<br />
Community Based Tourism is about Shared Benefits and Control<br />
In Port Renfrew, a ‘new world’ is built on ancient trees  -  Coastal town replaces logging with tourism<br />"We used to d...
The Ancient Forest Alliance<br />Backing against a giant Douglas fir in Francis King Regional Park,TJ Watt, Tara Sawatsky ...
Forest cover on southern Vancouver Island in 1860.<br />Forest cover on southern Vancouver Island in 2004. The yellow area...
Port Renfrew – Home of Canada’s Biggest Trees<br />‘The Big Trees Capital’<br />Eco Tourism Destination<br />Green Gold<br />
Red Creek Fir – The Worlds Largest Douglas Fir<br />Hiker Alex Demasson stands beside the towering Red Creek Fir. Growing ...
Avatar Grove – The World’s Gnarliest Red Cedar<br />The San Juan Spruce – Canada’s Largest Sitka Spruce<br />The Harris Cr...
   “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that...
Juan De Fuca Electoral Area<br />Source: CRD Map - http://www.crd.bc.ca/jdf/<br />
Sooke Region Tourist Association (SRTA) <br />Established in 2008  - group of business people and local political leaders,...
Form a Tourism Planning Committee<br />Agenda  for first meeting<br /><ul><li>  Introduction to tourism development
  Introduction to tourism and how the sector operates
  Tourism as a diversification strategy
  Benefits and costs of tourism
  Need for planning and community involvement
  Open discussion
  Identification of current tourism efforts
  Identification of local assets
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Port Renfrew

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  • Sustain – to nourishSustainability is related to the quality of life in a community -- whether the economic, social and environmental systems that make up the community are providing a healthy, productive, meaningful life for all community residents, present and future.Model 1A view of community as three separate, unrelated parts: an economic part, a social part and an environmental part. However, when society, economy and environment are viewed as separate, unrelated parts of a community, the community&apos;s problems are also viewed as isolated issues. Economic development councils try to create more jobs. Social needs are addressed by health care services and housing authorities. Environmental agencies try to prevent and correct pollution problems. Model 2A view of community that shows the links among its three parts: the economic part, the social part and the environmental part.Sustainable development improves the economy without undermining the society or the environment.Q: Does our tourism development vision and plan match the skills of the available workforce? If not, how can we build capacity internally?A sustainable community is one where development is not unlimited growth; rather it is the enhancement of what already exists in the community. A sustainable community is not stagnant; sustainability does not mean things never change. On the contrary, it means always looking for ways to improve a community by strengthening the links between its economy, environment and society.
  • Sustain – to nourishSustainability is related to the quality of life in a community -- whether the economic, social and environmental systems that make up the community are providing a healthy, productive, meaningful life for all community residents, present and future.Model 1A view of community as three separate, unrelated parts: an economic part, a social part and an environmental part. However, when society, economy and environment are viewed as separate, unrelated parts of a community, the community&apos;s problems are also viewed as isolated issues. Economic development councils try to create more jobs. Social needs are addressed by health care services and housing authorities. Environmental agencies try to prevent and correct pollution problems. Model 2A view of community that shows the links among its three parts: the economic part, the social part and the environmental part.Sustainable development improves the economy without undermining the society or the environment.Q: Does our tourism development vision and plan match the skills of the available workforce? If not, how can we build capacity internally?A sustainable community is one where development is not unlimited growth; rather it is the enhancement of what already exists in the community. A sustainable community is not stagnant; sustainability does not mean things never change. On the contrary, it means always looking for ways to improve a community by strengthening the links between its economy, environment and society. Model 3A view of community as three concentric circles: the economy exists within society, and both the economy and society exist within the environment.
  • Sustain – to nourishSustainability is related to the quality of life in a community -- whether the economic, social and environmental systems that make up the community are providing a healthy, productive, meaningful life for all community residents, present and future.Model 1A view of community as three separate, unrelated parts: an economic part, a social part and an environmental part. However, when society, economy and environment are viewed as separate, unrelated parts of a community, the community&apos;s problems are also viewed as isolated issues. Economic development councils try to create more jobs. Social needs are addressed by health care services and housing authorities. Environmental agencies try to prevent and correct pollution problems. Model 2A view of community that shows the links among its three parts: the economic part, the social part and the environmental part.Sustainable development improves the economy without undermining the society or the environment.Q: Does our tourism development vision and plan match the skills of the available workforce? If not, how can we build capacity internally?A sustainable community is one where development is not unlimited growth; rather it is the enhancement of what already exists in the community. A sustainable community is not stagnant; sustainability does not mean things never change. On the contrary, it means always looking for ways to improve a community by strengthening the links between its economy, environment and society. Model 3A view of community as three concentric circles: the economy exists within society, and both the economy and society exist within the environment.
  • Port Renfrew

    1. 1. Community Based Tourism in Port Renfrew <br />Rebecca Wilson-Mah<br />Royal Roads University Learning Session<br /> August 11, 2011<br />
    2. 2. Learning Objectives<br />This session will examine ways in which community based tourism principles and practice can support rural tourism development in the community of Port Renfrew.<br />Upon completion of this session you will be able to:<br />Explain some of the key principles for community based tourism development.<br />Discuss the need for a community based tourism plan for the community and/or region.<br />Identify the key steps to start the community based tourism planning process.<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4.
    5. 5.
    6. 6. The Butler Sequence (1980)<br />Butler, R.W. 1980. The concept of a tourism area cycle of evolution: Implications for management resources. Canadian Geographer 24(1): 70<br />
    7. 7. Some Key Principles for Community Based Tourism Development<br />Sustainability<br />Diversification<br />Shared Benefits and Control<br />Source: Adapted from Messer, C C. (2004). Community tourism development. University of Minnesota, MN <br />
    8. 8. Sustainability is related to the quality of life in a community -- whether the economic, social and environmental systems that make up the community are providing a healthy, productive, meaningful life for all community residents, present and future.<br />Source: www.sustainablemeasures.com<br /> Principle 1: Community Based Tourism is Sustainable Tourism<br />
    9. 9. Principle 2: Community Based Tourism is a Diversification Tool<br />Tourism should be a diversification tool, not a substitute for other local industry. A community’s ability to weather hard times is enhanced when there are several sources of economic activity.<br />
    10. 10. Principle 3: Community Based Tourism is about Shared Benefits and Control<br />
    11. 11. Community Based Tourism is about Shared Benefits and Control<br />
    12. 12.
    13. 13. In Port Renfrew, a ‘new world’ is built on ancient trees - Coastal town replaces logging with tourism<br />"We used to depend on logging to sustain Port Renfrew. Now the tables have turned and we're looking at the tall trees as our future." quote from Rosie Betsworth, Chamber of Commerce President as the Ancient Forest Alliance and the Chamber of Commerce cemented their partnership with the opening of a new tourist information centre, where visitors can pick up a map of the area's massive old-growth trees. "Some of the older folks from the logging industry have other opinions and that's fair. This community did survive by logging in the past, but they have to understand this is a new world. This will sustain our town."<br />Times Colonist - Judith Lavoie, July 15, 2011<br />Link to original article:http://www.timescolonist.com/business/Port+Renfrew+world+built+ancient+trees/5105511/story.html#ixzz1SC4QX4yz<br />
    14. 14. The Ancient Forest Alliance<br />Backing against a giant Douglas fir in Francis King Regional Park,TJ Watt, Tara Sawatsky and Ken Wu have formed theAncient Forest Alliance to draw attention to old-growth forestson Vancouver Island and in B.C.<br />Goldstream News Gazette, January 20, 2010Edward Hill, News staff<br />
    15. 15. Forest cover on southern Vancouver Island in 1860.<br />Forest cover on southern Vancouver Island in 2004. The yellow areas were previously logged and are now second-growth forests, clearcuts, agricultural lands, and urban developments.<br />Photo analysis based on 2004 LandSat satellite images, The Sierra Club<br />
    16. 16. Port Renfrew – Home of Canada’s Biggest Trees<br />‘The Big Trees Capital’<br />Eco Tourism Destination<br />Green Gold<br />
    17. 17. Red Creek Fir – The Worlds Largest Douglas Fir<br />Hiker Alex Demasson stands beside the towering Red Creek Fir. Growing in the San Juan Valley 30 minutes from Port Renfrew BC, it is the worlds largest known Douglas Fir measuring - Height: 73.8m (242'), Circumference: 13.3m (43.7'), Diameter: 4.2m (14')Photo by TJ Watt<br />GPS for Red Creek Fir Parking:lat = 48.57990lon = -124.22639<br />
    18. 18. Avatar Grove – The World’s Gnarliest Red Cedar<br />The San Juan Spruce – Canada’s Largest Sitka Spruce<br />The Harris Creek Spruce<br />Hiker Rebecca Wilson-Mah and Leo Mah<br />beside the Gnarly Red Cedar growing in the amazing but logging-threatened Avatar Grove near Port Renfrew, BC.<br />Photo by R Wilson-Mah<br />
    19. 19.
    20. 20. “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” - Margaret Mead<br />
    21. 21. Juan De Fuca Electoral Area<br />Source: CRD Map - http://www.crd.bc.ca/jdf/<br />
    22. 22.
    23. 23.
    24. 24. Sooke Region Tourist Association (SRTA) <br />Established in 2008 - group of business people and local political leaders, lead by the Sooke Harbour Chamber of Commerce and supported by the District of Sooke, The Juan de Fuca Economic Development Commission and Tourism Vancouver Island.<br />
    25. 25. Form a Tourism Planning Committee<br />Agenda for first meeting<br /><ul><li> Introduction to tourism development
    26. 26. Introduction to tourism and how the sector operates
    27. 27. Tourism as a diversification strategy
    28. 28. Benefits and costs of tourism
    29. 29. Need for planning and community involvement
    30. 30. Open discussion
    31. 31. Identification of current tourism efforts
    32. 32. Identification of local assets
    33. 33. Decision to proceed with a local or regional planning process</li></ul>A Community Based Plan (Local or Regional for Port Renfrew<br />
    34. 34. Recommendations for Port Renfrew<br />Promote an integrated stakeholder approach that incorporates the three imperatives of sustainability<br />Think regionally as well as locally<br />Develop a community vision<br />Source the community champion(s)<br />Engage in a plan – to set goals and provide guidelines for development<br />Source funding and resources<br />
    35. 35.
    36. 36. “Many a false step has been made by standing still.” - Fortune Cookie<br />
    37. 37. “To plan is to choose.” - Government of Tanzania, First Development Plan 1964<br />
    38. 38. Continuing learning – Where do we do from here?<br />Field School Opportunity in Port Renfrew<br />Case study<br />Idea Wave<br />
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