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Reading purposes and strategies
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Reading purposes and strategies

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Some common used reading strategies

Some common used reading strategies

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  • 1.  CNN news headlines.  Countless e-mail messages.  A memo from a staff member.  A report from a teacher.  Some students complaints.  Some poems a friend wrote.  A couple of academic texts.  Some whatsapp messages from my wife.  The label of a bottle of wine. The final chapter of a novel. The instructions to prepare an instant soup.
  • 2. 1. To obtain information for some purpose or because we are curious about some topic. 2. To obtain instructions on how to perform some task for our work or daily life. 3. To act in a play, play a game, do a puzzle. 4. To keep in touch with friends by correspondence or to understand business letters. 5. To know when or where something will take place or what is available. 6. To know what is happening or has happened. 7. For enjoyment or excitement. Second Language Teaching and Learning – Chapter 9 – Nunan 1999
  • 3.  typically makes use of authentic and challenging texts;  provides students with a rethorical framework for processing and analyzing the text;  frequently involves an oral reading of the text by the teacher or students followed by silent reading and rereading of the text;  involves the students interacting with the text and each other;  involves students in direct analysis of the text instead of indirect question answering;  frequently involves the transfer of information from text to a visual or diagrammatic representation. The DART (Directed Activities related to a Text) – Davies and Green (1984)