Chalk and Clay landscapes

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A simple overview of chalk and clay scenery and processes within England. Useful for GCSE rocks sections

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Chalk and Clay landscapes

  1. 1. Chalk and Clay Scenery
  2. 2. Distribution Describe the distribution (the spread and location) of chalk in England Chalk is sedimentary rock Chalk tends to form in bands – beds that cover large areas
  3. 3. Characteristics Chalk is a permeable rock – it allows water to pass through it It is also porous – this means there is a high proportion of pores in chalk. It is these pores that allow water into chalk which often makes it waterlogged Rainwater soaks through the pores until it reaches the water table – this is the upper surface of underground water storage Where the water table reaches the surface springs are formed
  4. 4. Characteristics Chalk is a pure form of limestone and rich in calcium carbonate which means it’s vulnerable to chemical weathering and carbonation As it contains joints and pores it is also vulnerable to freeze-thaw weathering
  5. 5. Chalk escarpment Box hill Clay vale. Notice the roads and rail links Steep scarp slope
  6. 6. View from Box Hill over clay vale  The clay vale is wetter with longer grass.  Dairy farming is practiced.  It is easier to build roads and settlements on the flatter clay  The clay can be used for brick making
  7. 7. Devils Dyke East Sussex Dry valley
  8. 8. Look out from the top of Box Hill Chalk and flint provides good and attractive building material
  9. 9. Epsom Downs The chalk is good for racehorse training

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