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Sharon Mickan: Identifying Research Opportunities In Your Own Backyard
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Sharon Mickan: Identifying Research Opportunities In Your Own Backyard

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Sharon Mickan: Identifying Research Opportunities In Your Own Backyard Sharon Mickan: Identifying Research Opportunities In Your Own Backyard Presentation Transcript

  • Identifying research opportunities in your own backyard Dr Sharon Mickan Senior Lecturer Oxford Brookes University
  • Overview
    • Personal examples of developing research
    • The journey of research
    • Developing a culture of enquiry
    • Group workshop - Plan an audit
  • Research development experiences
    • Personal study
    • Journal clubs, with a twist
    • OT research facilitator
    • Dissertation students
    • Writing grant applications
    View slide
  • 1. Personal Study
    • Postgraduate study can be contagious
      • Interesting discussions
      • Sharing articles
      • Preparing posters, presentations
    • It does require management support, time
    • You need to make your topic real
    • You can foster a culture of enquiry, asking questions
    View slide
  • 2. Journal clubs with a twist
    • Traditional journal clubs often fade
      • Re –energise with students
      • Invite other professionals for opinion
    • EBP lunchtime seminars
      • Start with a clinical scenario, question
      • Online real time searching using search terms
      • Read and critique abstracts
      • Reflect back on the original clinical scenario
  • 3. OT Research Facilitator
    • Package of 1 day/ week facilitation, with interested staff having dedicated time
    • Afternoon/week/month is not realistic – need to collect time and work away from clinical environment
    • Useful to supervise
      • quality audits,
      • prepare conference presentations, summary articles
      • set up comparative pilot/audit of practice
  • 4. Dissertation students
    • Students must prepare a literature review and a research proposal
      • make it real within a clinical partnership
      • use, edit, publish literature review
      • students can build on each other’s work
    • Need to be clear about a realistic and researchable question
  • 5. Writing grant applications
    • Big grants need big teams of big people
      • collaborations between academia & practice
    • Start small and achievable
    • Ask for funding
      • Professional associations
      • Self help, client information organisations
  • The journey of research
    • Starts with a culture of enquiry
      • Asking questions – what is known
      • What is not known – be very specific
      • Get the basics right first
  • Use clinical audits
    • You need to know what is happening
      • before you can understand where the problems, bottlenecks are
      • Before you can suggest, plan improvements
      • Before you can evaluate whether it has made a difference
  • OTs use audits in many ways
    • Client satisfaction
    • Referral forms, guidelines
    • Clinical pathways
    • Waiting list evaluation, management
    • Utilisation of equipment review
    • Caseload review
    • Individual, group therapy review ….
  • A client’s question Mickan S and Rodger S (2002) Quality activities: Utilising evidence and informing clinical research. Australian Journal of Occupational Therapy. 49(2), 93-99.
  • Use the Quality activity cycle Mickan S and Rodger S (2002) Quality activities: Utilising evidence and informing clinical research. Australian Journal of Occupational Therapy. 49(2), 93-99.
  • Clinical Audit Framework
    • Plan
    • Do
    • Check
    • Act
  • Plan
    • 1. Select the topic
      • describe the problem/issue
      • what is current policy practice?
      • clarify outcome/expectation
      • who will benefit? how?
      • what do you want to know
    • 2. Clarify standards based on evidence
      • describe setting/context/literature
      • what sort of answers are you looking for?
      • what are the key concepts?
    • 3. Choose the workgroup
      • what population are you interested in?
      • ensure appropriate mix of skills & influence
  • Do
    • 4. Set up processes for data collection and analysis
      • ensure you are measuring your key concepts
      • are there standardised/validated tools?
      • how will the data address your problem?
      • how will the data be collected?
      • ensure sufficient resources
    • 5. Collect baseline measurements
      • develop consistent data collection methods
      • is recording part of regular care?
    • 6. Analysis
      • identify causes of problem / reasons for result
      • do you need help? from whom?
  • Check
    • 7. Develop solutions based on data analysis
      • prioritise solutions
      • identify changes needed
      • consult with key stakeholders
    • 8. Suggest strategies for change
      • implement best solution
      • use natural change leaders
  • Act
    • 9. Implement change
      • ensure consistent data collection
    • 10. Evaluate
      • analyse & interpret
      • what is the evaluation plan?
      • are the timescales realistic?
      • relate to original problem
    • 11. Review standards based on findings
      • disseminate to appropriate audience
  • Clinical audits and Research?
    • There are many similarities
    • Aim to provide knowledge to improve patient care
    • Use principles of disciplined and systematic enquiry
    • Require a clear problem, question
    • Require consistent methods of data collection, measurement, analysis, interpretation
  • The journey to research
    • Can start with Clinical Audits
    • They can develop a culture of enquiry
      • Asking questions – what is known
      • What is not known – be very specific
      • Get the basics right first
    • They can utilise research evidence
      • Evaluate research in practice
    • They can inform future research
  • Group Workshop
    • In groups of 4-6, use the framework supplied to develop a clinical audit in a real practice setting
    • Work through the steps logically
    • Act as critical friends for each other – be critical of the discipline, rigor, measurement, analysis
    • It is better to rethink your evaluation plan before you start than realise half way through you did not collect the right data, or ask the right questions!