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  • Have on the screen as participants enter the training area.
  • SAY: Let’s get started. TRAINER NOTES: Paraphrase the bulleted information.
  • TRAINER NOTES: Quickly review previous module by paraphrasing
  • TRAINER NOTES: Presenter orally reads slowly and clearly out loud for the participants OR Have participants read one bullet at a time out loud OR Chorally (entire class) read objectives
  • TRAINER NOTES: Presenter orally reads slowly and clearly out loud for the participants OR Have participants read one bullet at a time out loud OR Chorally (entire class) read objectives
  • Note to trainer: This slide addresses the 1 st content objective: Differentiating Social from Academic language. SAY: In 1981, Canadian professor and researcher, Jim Cummins, introduced these terms. The triangular graphic represents his “iceberg” model and shows two types of language proficiency: social (the visible portion above the water’s surface) and academic (the submerged portion). Both types of language proficiency are important to academic success. Students must be able to understand and use the English of everyday social and routine classroom interactions as well as the English they need for accessing and negotiating learning , processing cognitively demanding information, and building conceptual understanding. BICS (Basic Intrapersonal Communication Skills) : Everyday language needed for daily social interactions BICS are acquired more quickly than CALP and are often easy to observe. You may wish to share some examples of BICS with participants: Listening and Speaking: Discourse among friends in the hallway between classes, at recess, at lunch, on the school bus, on the telephone, at the mall, etc. Reading and Writing: Reading a note from a friend; writing a letter to a relative; composing/reading casual e-mail; reading bulletin boards, announcements, and other environmental print; writing lists; etc. CALP (Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency) : Language needed to access learning in academic settings This is the language students need in order to think critically, understand and learn new concepts, process complex academic material, and interact and communicate in academic contexts. This part of the “iceberg” has more depth because this type of language proficiency takes longer to acquire.
  • Say: Let’s take a look at the difference between Basic Intrapersonal Communication Skills (BICS) and the Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency Skills (CALPS). Look at the word guess listed as a word under the BICS. The academic word for guess in Science is Hypothesis . The academic word for guess in Math is Estimate , and the academic word for guess in Social Studies is Speculation. TRAINER NOTES: Point out that students may know the word guess but in order to be able to perform in Science, Math, and Social Studies, they need the academic language that is listed in the examples. As teachers, we need to teach students this academic vocabulary by relating it to the words that they know and applying it in different content areas. As a whole group, practice with the word “Rules”. Then come up with the academic words for Rules under Science, Math, and Social Studies collaboratively. Type audiences’ responses on the form Then, have participants finish one chart as a group by filling in the missing words. Share answers with the whole group.
  • Note to trainer: This slide describes the second content objective: Distinguish Content vv. Language Objective SAY: As teachers we need to teach content and academic language. The first step in teaching academic language is to define the content objectives and language objectives. Content objectives are what teachers already are expected to have in their lesson plans. They identify what students should know and be able to do in particular content areas. They support school, district, and state content standards and learning outcomes, and they guide teaching and learning in the classroom. Language Objectives are statements that identify what students should know and be able to do while using English (or another language). They support students’ language development, often focusing on vocabulary, functional language, questioning, articulating predictions or hypothesis, listening, speaking, reading, and writing .
  • SAY: Since we already know how to write content objectives, let’s focus on language objectives. TRAINER NOTES: Read/paraphrase the slide then: Point out that the language objectives should be stated clearly both orally and in writing. This means that language objectives should be posted in the room along with the content objectives and teachers should read and point to the posted objectives before every lesson. This allows the students to preview what the lesson will be about, and it also helps students with vocabulary and pronunciation as the teacher models correct pronunciation of vocabulary in the language objectives. SAY: The next slides will further explain each bullet on this slide. Look at the second bullet; it says that a language objective should: *be closely related to the content’s topic TRAINER NOTES: click to the next slide for more information on this bullet.
  • SAY: In order for a language objective to be closely related to the content’s topic it must reflect the TEKS being taught, it must use ELPS student expectations, and it must target the content area language needs.
  • SAY: This is an example of a content objective and it’s language objectives. Notice how the language objective: Is closely related to the content’s topic – both language objectives address place value It explicitly reflects the language demands of the content topic – (Students will be giving oral responses, repeating) It address HOW students will use language during the lesson – (The students will listen, repeat, use the place value vocabulary) TRAINER NOTES: Reminder: Content and Language objectives should be posted in the classroom in a place where students can read along as teachers point and read the objectives of the day. The reason is so that students look at the words and the teacher as objectives are being read which also helps them with fluency and pronunciation.
  • SAY: As you prepare to write language objectives, consider the following: When writing a language objective, consider the activities you have planned to accomplish the content objective. Instead of a worksheet, select activities where students have the opportunity to use one or more language skills. Also think about the intended purpose of the activity. Ask yourself, are the students using the language to ask for information, compare, or give advise? What is the language function to be used? What is the key vocabulary that students need to have in order to understand the concept? Can the student connect the “BICS” word to an academic word. (informal language to formal language to help with comprehension) For example, the student may know the word “guess” (informal), can they connect it to the academic word “estimate” (formal). The language strategies are part of the student expectations on the ELPS document. What strategy could you use? Do activities lend themselves to teach language structures? For example, as you teach a math concept, can you teach correct sentence structure by having students respond in journals?
  • SAY: In order to help you write language objectives we will be using the Language Objective Framework. TRAINER NOTES: Have participants refer to their Language Objective Framework handout. This is printed on yellow paper. Explain that the framework is broken down into 4 parts. Explain what we will do in order to practice writing language objectives (bullet 3)
  • SAY: When using the Language Objective Framework, start by writing down your content objective and identifying the concept. TRAINER NOTES: Remind audience that the content objective is what you are used to writing in your daily lesson plans.
  • SAY: Select the language skill/s that you will be promoting. Think about how the learner will be practicing their learning: in groups, pairs, any role playing, interviewing, reading, videos, technology…? The activity for guided and independent practice will determine the language skill you will be addressing. Generally speaking, worksheets only involve reading. The activities we choose should vary so that students have the opportunity to practice different language skills.
  • TRAINER NOTES: Go over the different categories: Language Functions, Key Vocabulary, Language Learning Strategies, and the Language Structures. SAY: When writing language objectives, look at the content objective and select the category or categories that you think can apply to teaching that content’s language. You do not have to use all the categories. You can choose 1 or more depending on what teacher considers is appropriate for the lesson.
  • SAY: Using the 3 parts discussed previously: the content objective, the language skills chosen, and the categories selected, you can now write a language objective. In addition, notice that the back of the handout has samples of verbs that can be used when writing language objectives. Trainer Notes: Review a few verbs to help participants make connections.
  • TRAINER NOTES: Read note in the box: The intent of this tool is to provide a concrete framework in the process of learning to write language objectives. Once the process is internalized, this concrete framework is no longer needed. Emphasize that this is not a required step, but a tool to help write language objectives.
  • SAY: Take a look at a sample content objective. This happens to be an elementary objective in the area of Math. Notice the concept: Number Sense Remember: The content objective is what you are used to writing in your daily lesson plans. Notice that we included the concept in the framework. Keeping the big concept in mind will help you think beyond the specific objective as far as language is concerned.
  • SAY: This time, I would like the students to work in pairs in order to generate numbers using a spinner. Then record and talk about what number is greater and why. This activity lends itself to promote the listening and speaking language skills.
  • SAY: The two categories chosen for this language objective are comparing and using concept words. Notice how I did not use all the categories. A teacher may choose to use only 1 category to write his/her language objective.
  • SAY: Here is an example of a language objective Using the Language Objective Framework and its components: the content objective, the language skills chosen, and the categories selected.
  • TRAINER NOTES: Presenter asks for a volunteer to scribe on the board or chart paper. Ask the participants for a content objective and a concept - this is an objective that they use in their daily lesson plans. Scribe writes it on the board or chart paper. Ask Audience to think about the activities that you can do other than a worksheet so the students can do their guided practice and their individual practice. Then decide on the language skills that the activities lend themselves to use. Ask audience to decide on what language objective categories they will be using for this particular lesson. Write a language objective as a group.
  • TRAINER NOTES: Divide audience in groups of 5 or 6. Explain task: as a group , they will use the Language Objective Framework to write a language objective. Filled out forms will be displayed on the wall for others to read in a “gallery walk” so audience has the opportunity to read different language objectives created by other groups. This is their “ticket off the island”. (Lin K, Rigor and Relevance)
  • TRAINER NOTES: Conclude this module by posting the groups’ completed forms on the wall. If time allows, have participants stand up and do a “gallery walk” 

Module 2 Ffd[1] Module 2 Ffd[1] Presentation Transcript

  • English Language Proficiency Standards MODULE II Fall 2009
  • Introduction
    • Welcome!
    • Module II : Student Expectations---Developing Language through Content Area Instruction
    • In the next hour we will:
    • Quickly review concepts learned in Module I
    • Compare and contrast social and academic language
    • Define and identify content and language objectives
    • Discuss utilizing the ELPS in our lesson plans
    • Conclusions, connections and reflections
  • Review Module I
    • As a group we:
      • Discussed the historical perspective of second language acquisition and the creation of the ELPS
      • Navigated through the ELPS document
  • Content Objectives
    • The learner will be able to (TLWBAT)
      • Differentiate social language from academic language
      • Distinguish content objectives from language objectives
      • Identify the components needed to make a good language objective
      • Construct language objectives
  • Language Objectives
    • The learner will be able to (TLWBAT):
      • Articulate the difference between social and academic language
      • State the differences between content and language objectives
      • List the components needed to make a good language objective
      • Compose language objectives
  • Cognitive Stages in Language Acquisition Differentiating Social from Academic Language
  • BICS vs. CALP Which language do we use more often? BICS CALPS Science Math Social Studies Guess Hypothesis Estimate Speculation Rules     Laws     Subtract   Same     Identical   Method     Plan             Justice     Numerous  
  • Content and Language Objectives : Developing Academic Language Using the ELPS
      • CONTENT OBJECTIVES
      • Statements that identify what students should know and be able to do in particular content areas. They support school, district and state content standards and learning outcomes, and they guide teaching and learning in the classroom.
      • LANGUAGE OBJECTIVES
      • Statements that identify what students should know and be able to do while using English (or another language). They support students’ language development, often focusing on vocabulary, functional language, questioning, articulating predictions or hypotheses, listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • A Language Objective Should…
    • Be stated clearly and simply, and students should be informed of them, both orally and in writing
    • Be closely related to the content’s topic
    • Explicitly reflect the language demands of the content topic
      • Written independently from the content objective
    • Address HOW students will use language during the lesson
      • Functions of language
        • Social and Academic
      • Language skills
        • Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing
  • In order to be closely related to the content’s topic, a language objective should…
      • Use content standards (TEKS)
      • Use language proficiency standards (Newly adopted ELPS)
      • be targeted to what the students need to learn about the academic language in the content topic
  • I n order to explicitly reflect the language demands of the content topic, a language objective should…
    • Be written independently from the content objective
    • Example:
      • CONTENT:
        • TSW read large numbers in math using correct order and number terms.
      • LANGUAGE:
        • TSW listen to the teacher and students giving responses, and repeat what they have heard.
        • TSW use the language of place value, including million, thousand, hundred.
  • In order to address HOW students will use language during the lesson a language objective should include…
    • Language Skills
      • Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing
    • Functions of language
      • Social and Academic
    • Key Vocabulary
    • Language Learning Strategies
    • Language Structures
  • A scaffold for writing Language Objectives:
    • Language Objective Framework
      • This is a concrete framework to help in the process of writing language objectives.
      • It has four different parts
        • Let’s look at an example of how to use the framework to write a language objective, then we will use it to write one together, and last, in groups of 5 or 6 you will create a language objective for a “gallery walk”
    • Content Objective
    Language Objective Framework
    • Language Skills
    Language Objective Framework
    • Categories
    Language Objective Framework Adapted from Making Content Comprehensible
    • Language Objective
    Language Objective Framework
    • Final Note
    Language Objective Framework NOTE: the intent of this tool is to provide a concrete framework in the process of learning to write language objectives. Once the process is internalized, this concrete framework is not necessary.
    • Example of a Content Objective
    Language Objective Framework TSWBAT compare numbers using >,< or = Number Sense
    • Language Skills
    Language Objective Framework
    • Categories
    Language Objective Framework
    • Language Objective
    Language Objective Framework In pairs, after generating numbers, students will orally compare the value of their digits using the words grater than, less than, and equal to.
  • Guided Practice
    • Let’s create a language objective together!
    • Use the Language Objective Framework and use chart paper to
    • Record the content objective and the
    • concept.
    • Select the language skill
    • Select the category/ categories
    • Write a language objective
  • Cooperative Group Practice
    • In teams of 5 or 6
      • Decide on a concept
      • Write a content objective
      • Choose a language skill
      • Select a language objective category
      • Write a language objective
  • End of Module II
    • Ticket to 5 minute gallery walk:
      • Post group’s Language Objective Frameworks on the wall.
      • On a sticky note, write down a reflection, on language objectives.
      • Take 5 minutes to read the completed frameworks from all the other groups.