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  • Have on the screen as participants enter the training area.
  • TRAINING NOTES: During our three modules we will always begin with a quick review of our previous learning, followed by stating the content and language objectives of each module. In this module we will be able to re-cap the historical perspective of second language acquisition and the development of the ELPS. Then, we will engage in a hands on activity to explore the newly adopted English Language Proficiency Standards. At the end of each module we will take a minute to reflect on our learning and make connections.
  • ENVIRONMENT: Have content objectives posted in front of the training area. As we go over the content objectives you will be able to recognize that the content objectives are our traditional way of beginning our lesson cycle. TRAINING NOTES: As you review the content objectives refer to the posters. SAY: Take a moment to silently read the posted content objectives. When you have finished, we will go over them together. Then, paraphrase: After this module we will be able to: communicate the big ideas of the new document. We refer to the school district’s requirements and responsibilities as the big ideas of the new required curriculum. summarize the students’ cross curricular expectations relating to language acquisition. consider (learn, revise, examine) the linguistic proficiency levels of the students in the different language domains.
  • TRAINING NOTES: SAY: Language objectives will be a new element in our lesson plans as we implement the new required curriculum. Notice that the language objectives written for these modules will always be aligned to the content objectives. As you review the language objectives refer to the posters. SAY: Take a moment to silently read the posted language objectives. When you finish, we will review them together. (As you review the language objectives refer to the posters.) Then, paraphrase: After this module we will be able to: express and explain the school districts requirements and responsibilities give examples of strategies supporting second language acquisition across the curriculum describe (give details, clarify) the four language domains and proficiency level descriptors
  • TRAINING NOTES: Use this data to provide a clear focus for this session. SAY: The number of LEP students in Texas, our region and district has increased in the last few years and the numbers shown on this slide are the most current statistics. Now, 27 percent of the students enrolled in our district are identified as LEP. Ask participants to reflect on this information and share their thoughts on how these statistics should impact our instructional practices. Have a few of the participants share their thoughts.
  • USE THESE NOTES FOR YOUR REFERENCE AND PARAPHRASE AS YOU FEEL COMFORTABLE: In the 1970’s ESL focused on developing social language (i.e. language needed for shopping, traveling, and the workplace) In the 1980’s, Sheltered instruction grew in significance for teachers of ELL’s. (Krashen, S., 1982. Principles and practices in second language acquisition . Oxford: Pergamon.) In 1998, the ESL standards were adopted as part of the TEKS in Spanish and English Language Arts. These included student expectations and descriptions of proficiency levels for reading, writing, listening and speaking for students at various levels of language proficiency. However, few content area teachers made use of them when planning instruction for ELL’s. In 1999, SIOP research validated the importance of sheltered instruction in the content areas to improve instruction for ELL’s. (Echevarria, J., Short, D., Vogt, M., 2008. Making content comprehensible. The sheltered instruction observation protocol. Boston, MA: Pearson.) In 2001, the No Child Left Behind Act was passed which required research-based instruction. In 2006, the ESL standards were revised in response to research that indicated that one of the keys to success for ELL’s is a consistent focus on content area language acquisition . This approach emphasizes the need to intentionally make content comprehensible while developing academic language skills for ELL’s. It also requires academic language instruction be integrated into all areas of instruction. In 2007, the ELPS went into effect which requires that cross curricular second language acquisition skills be integrated into each subject of the required curriculum. The new ELPS contain a brief introduction into what kind of instruction is required for ELL’s, an outline of district responsibilities, cross curricular expectations, and language proficiency level descriptors. (Refer to p. 10 of the book for the introduction of the ELPS, p. 12 for a summary of the ELPS and p. 13 for a summary of the Proficiency Level Descriptors.)
  • The new required curriculum for Second Language Learners is known as the English Language Proficiency Standards (the ELPS) ThE newly adopted ELPS (English Language Proficiency Standards) will replace the English As a Second Language Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, known as ESL TEKS. RECOMMENDED ACTIVITIES: SAY: To understand the difference between the previous ESL TEKS and the new standards, we will engage in a quick activity. I need 4 volunteers to stand in front of the room, next to me. One person will represent math, one will represent science, one will represent social studies, and one will represent English Language Arts. I (the presenter), will represent the ESL TEKS. Ask the audience: Where were the ESL TEKS located? (answer: in the English Language Arts TEKS; have the person representing ELA put his/her hand on your shoulder, the ESL TEKS). As you can see the ESL TEKS were only aligned to the English Language Arts TEKS. Ask your volunteers to remain standing next to you Then, explain: The new ESL standards were revised in 2007 in response to research. Unlike the former ESL TEKS the ELPS clearly indicate that these standards are to be integrated into each subject of the required curriculum. Ask the audience: Where are the new ELPS located? (answer: in all content areas; have all volunteers put their hands on the presenter’s shoulders.) Now, you can see how the ELPS are linked to all content areas of the curriculum. Discussion Questions : Pretend you are a social studies teacher with one ELL and one non ELL. How do you address the ELPS in this situation? (answer: All students need academic language, so incorporating the ELPS will help all of your students.) This is important because _____________.” Have participants share responses at their table and then call on individuals. The new standards will provide a unique opportunity to improve instruction for English Language Learners since now we will teach academic language through the content areas.
  • SAY: The implementation of the ELPS will help ALL learners with academic vocabulary development needed in all content areas. It may be a requirement for LEP students, however all students will benefit from having support acquiring academic language.
  • There are 4 main parts of Chapter 74.4, (English Language Proficiency Standards). Introduction Our Responsibilities Student Expectations Proficiency Levels NOTE: Use this visual to introduce the document and conclude the ‘hands-on’ activity.
  • SAY: To familiarize ourselves with the 4 main parts of the ELPS we will engage in an activity. Go over the guidelines of the activity. Ask participants to share
  • SAY: Let’s review our understanding of the ELPS. The introduction, contains the BIG IDEAS of the document, which are: To provide a common framework for integrating language and content instruction for English Language learners To build social and academic language To make content comprehensible To outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English Language learners
  • SAY: Section “B” describes our RESP0NSIBILITIES. To identify the student’s English language proficiency levels To provide instruction that is linguistically accommodated to match the student’s level of English Language proficiency
  • SAY: According to section “B” of the ELPS, our responsibilities are to provide: intensive and ongoing foundational second language acquisition instruction to English language learners students with focused, targeted and systematic foundation of the English language RECOMMENDED ACTIVITY: Use p. 19 of the Navigating the ELPS to clarify the meaning of these requirements. Have them quickly read and discuss these three requirements.
  • SAY: Section “C” of the document delineates the student expectations. The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop awareness of his/her own learning processes in all content areas through activities conducive to listening, speaking, reading and writing The Five ELPS Strands: learning strategies, listening, speaking, reading, and writing provide guidance to teachers towards best practices for teaching and working with ELLs.
  • SAY: Section ”D” of the document describes the language levels of ELLs. We must know and understand if our students are at the Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced or Advanced High Levels of their English language acquisition, in order to plan and deliver rigorous, appropriate and effective instruction.
  • TRAINER NOTE: Use this page to connect new learning (ELPS) to prior learning (TELPAS) Proficiency Level Descriptors (PLDs) The PLDs for each language domain present a set of major attributes associated with each level. The descriptors do not constitute an exhaustive list but are sufficient to allow for holistic evaluations. Together, the summary statement and bulleted descriptors for each proficiency level form a student profile. These PLDs have been incorporated in the ELPS and are useful tools in the teacher’s hand as to the preparation of the appropriate instruction for his/her students.
  • SAY: In conclusion the newly adopted ELPS require us to: implement the standards as a fundamental part of the content areas use new state adoption textbooks since they will be aligned with the ELPS (These textbooks will serve as support for the classroom instruction) continue measuring ELLs English proficiency in the four language domains with TELPAS use the TELPAS performance results to re-direct and linguistically accommodate instruction for all ELLs

Module 1 Ffd[1] Module 1 Ffd[1] Presentation Transcript

  • English Language Proficiency Standards MODULE I Fall 2009
  • Introduction
    • Welcome!
    • Module I : Navigating the English Language Proficiency Standards
    • In the next hour we will:
    • State content and language objectives for this module (Module 1)
    • Summarize the historical perspective of second language acquisition and the development of the ELPS
    • Navigate the ELPS---Hands-on Activity
    • Conclusions, connections and reflections
  • Content Objectives
    • The learner will be able to (TLWBAT)
      • Articulate the school district’s requirements and responsibilities in the implementation of this required curriculum
      • Outline the students’ cross curricular expectations as they relate to language acquisition
      • Study the proficiency levels in the different language domains (listening, speaking, reading, writing) and their level descriptors, as stated in the new standards and TELPAS (beginner, intermediate, advanced, advanced high)
  • Language Objectives
    • The learner will be able to (TLWBAT) Read the document to decipher the different parts of the ELPS document by:
      • Orally communicating and justifying school district’s requirements and responsibilities
      • Giving examples of learning strategies needed to accelerate second language acquisition across the curriculum
      • Explaining the domains and proficiency level descriptors
  • Before we start… Limited English Proficient Students Identified in Texas *Region IV has the largest number of LEP students in State of Texas *Pasadena has a total enrollment of 55,000 students. Area 2008 - 2009 Texas 800,671 Region lV 211,717* Pasadena 14,934
  • Historical Background
    • Policy
    • 2001 – NCLB; focus on research-based instruction
    • 2006 – ESL standards revised in response to research
    • 2007 – English Language Proficiency Standards become part of TAC 74.4
    • Language Acquisition
    • 1980’s – Beginning of content based/ESL sheltered instruction
    • 1998 – ESL standards in Spanish and English Language Arts
    • 1998 – SIOP research validates use of instruction for ELL’s
  • Chapter 74.4 Curriculum Requirements: Subchapter A. Required Curriculum
    • The ELPS are a federal requirement under NCLB, Title III
    • The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) were approved by the State Board of Education November 16, 2007.
    • These standards will replace the English as a Second Language Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (ESL TEKS) beginning in the 2008-2009 school year and may be found on:
    http://www.tea.state.tx.us/curriculum/biling/elps.html
    • The English Language Proficiency Standards are to be published along with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for each subject in the required curriculum...
    Revised Commissioner’s Rules Title 19 (TAC) Chapter 89
  • Texas Education Agency LEP Instructional Excellence Center: Project Tesoro TEA §74.4 ELPS. Introduction: Big Ideas Our Responsibilities Student Expectations Proficiency Levels English Language Proficiency Standards
  • Navigating the ELPS--Activity
    • Form groups of 4-6 participants
    • Select a materials manager/team leader to pick up materials for the activity
    • At your table, discuss and sort out the document pieces into the four major areas of the ELPS
    • Be ready to share your
        • √ (Known)
        • ! (Unusual and surprising)
        • ? (Confusing)
        • + (New)
  • Introduction ELPS and TEKS Language Development Through Content Area Instruction Social and Academic Language Proficiency English Language Proficiency Levels Big Ideas §74.4 ELPS. (a) 1-6
  • All English instruction for Ells must be: Linguistically Accommodated Communicated Sequenced Scaffolded Texas Education Agency LEP Instructional Excellence Center: Project Tesoro TEA §74.4 ELPS. (b) 2 Our Responsibilities
  • Second Language Instruction must be: Texas Education Agency LEP Instructional Excellence Center: Project Tesoro TEA focused targeted systematic §74.4 ELPS. (b) 4 Our Responsibilities
  • Cross-Curricular Second Language Acquisition Texas Education Agency LEP Instructional Excellence Center: Project Tesoro TEA Learning Strategies Listening Speaking Reading Writing §74.4 ELPS. (c) 1 §74.4 ELPS. (c) 2 §74.4 ELPS. (c) 3 §74.4 ELPS. (c) 4 §74.4 ELPS. (c) 5 Student Expectations
  • English Language Proficiency Level Descriptors Texas Education Agency LEP Instructional Excellence Center: Project Tesoro TEA Beginning Intermediate Advanced Advanced High §74.4 ELPS. (d) Proficiency Levels
  • TELPAS Proficiency Level Descriptors Grades K-12 Listening Making Connections: ELPS Instruction and TELPAS Assessment
  • START English proficiency is measured with the TELPAS Textbooks are aligned with ELPS and Standards Aligned textbooks are used to support classroom instruction Performance on TELPAS informs instruction and professional development ELPS are implemented As integral part Of content standards
  • End of Module I
    • Ticket to 5 minute break:
      • On a sticky note, write down a reflection, on the content learned.