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  1. 1. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 1 of 55Nixon kicking of Mo. economic growthcommitteeAssociated Press - July 29, 2010 5:14 AM ETCOLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) - Gov. Jay Nixon is kicking off the work of a new committee charged with developing aneconomic growth plan for Missouri.Nixon planned to speak to members of the economic planning committee he created during their first meetingThursday at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Nixon announced the group in May.He wants the committee to develop six to 10 broad objectives that focus on industries important to Missouriseconomy, with specific steps to foster their growth. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  2. 2. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 2 of 55Governor Nixon Meets with Steering CommitteeKOMU-TV Reported by ; Scott Kanowsky Posted by ; Jessica SmithThe Governor actually started the group in May.The Steering Committee, as it is called, will create a plan to grow Missouris economy in the long-term.In particular, it will try to create a "21st century economy" in the show-me state.Thursday, Governor Nixon will address the group personally at the University of Missouri.On the committee are leaders in business, labor, and local government.Theyll interview businesses across the state before the put together a plan.The group says it will look to grow work force, quality of life, and the overall tax structure in Missouri.They will present a plan in 6 to 9 months. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  3. 3. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 3 of 55Fair amount of campaigningJEFFERSON CITY NEWS TRIBUNE By Ben YarnellPublished: Wednesday, July 28, 2010 11:25 PM CDTYes, it is hot. And yes, it can be crowded at times.But with less than a week left before primary elections, the Cole County Fair -- and others like it -- is one of thefinal, and often most essential, stops on the campaign trail for any candidate.But for someone like Missouri House of Representatives candidate Mike Bernskoetter, going out to the fair isnothing new. Bernskoetter, who participated when he was young in 4-H and presented livestock, said he hasbeen coming out to the fair for years. However, he said, he looks at the fair as an opportunity to meet with alarge number of potential voters in a very short amount of time."There have actually been quite a few number of people out there," Bernskoetter said. "We have been minglingwith people in the cow barns and the pig barns, visiting with the people who are coming and going. We end upseeing people who bring their kids out to ride the rides."But in a race like that for the 113th District House seat, candidates run into the challenge where not everyone atthe fair will be voting in their election. The two candidates for that seat take different approaches when it comesto this issue. For Bernskoetter, he said that while those people may not be voting in his election, they havefriends who will, so he takes the opportunity to ask them to encourage their friends who live on the east side oftown to vote for him.Fellow candidate Dan Klindt handles things differently. While Wednesday night was the first night of the ColeCounty Fair that Klindt has attended, as opposed to his opponent who has been there every night, he said hehas still been working just as hard going door to door in the district."It is always hard to decide whether I should be at the fair or should I be out knocking on doors actually talking toyour voters, especially at this stage in the game, so close to the election," Klindt said.Multiple fairsIn the race for former state Sen. Carl Vogels seat, that kind of a decision is compounded by the fact thatcandidates do not have the luxury of choosing whether or not to attend just one fair. Instead, candidates like BillDeeken have multiple fairs in different counties to try and attend, often at the same time."People know if you are there or not," Deeken said. "They want you to be at their fair. So you have got to bethere at least for a while so they can see you. And a lot of times, youve got other thing to do other than going tothe fair that night. You may have a meeting where all four of you are speaking or something like that."The way Kenny Jones explains it, fairs are a opportunity for a candidate like himself to get in contact with onekey demographic that he said he might not otherwise get to see as often -- the farmers."I think we see some people who dont come around much because they are so busy in the summer time," Jonessaid. "This is just a time, right after harvest, to actually relax, have a good time and come to town at the fair."I think thats very important. Agriculture is the number one income-producing entity in Missouri."Not all of a candidates responsibilities that come with meeting the masses at fairs shaking hands and talkingpolicy. There is a lighter side, where the candidates take each other on in competitions. Friday evening at 6 p.m.,the Senate candidates will meet up at the Cole County Fair for a goat-milking contest.While Harry Otto said he enjoys the events, he joked that it might take a little trickery to get the candidates toagree to some of the more foolish-looking events. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  4. 4. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 4 of 55"I think the people who put these things together call me up and they say, Harry, are you in? Because Mike,Kenny and Bill are in," Otto kidded. "And then they call up Kenny and say, Kenny, are you in? Because Harry,Kenny and Bill are in."I think they game us pretty good, starting with the bicycle race last September, which I was fortunate enough towin. Kenny ended up winning the pie-eating contest. I dont know what the Vegas odds are on the goat milking."And, of course, with having a good time as the focus of almost any fair, the candidates will have to make time forsome frivolity as well. For Mike Kehoe, it is almost an inevitability."I have four kids, so I dont have a chance not to do that," Kehoe said with a laugh. "They will be dragging mearound to all of the various things."We also have a booth set up for the fair and I have volunteers who are out there every night this week and allday on Saturday, so we have the option where, if somebody is looking for me and I happen to be on the ferriswheel, they can go to the booth and say, "I want to talk to Mike, and then I can come meet those folks. It makesfor a good staging area." News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  5. 5. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 5 of 55Missouri auditor releases higher educationreviewsBy Chris Blank ASSOCIATED PRESSJEFFERSON CITY, Mo. --The state Department of Higher Education should have been more involved in pickingprojects for a college construction program and additional coordination is needed among colleges, according toreviews released Wednesday by the state auditors office.Auditor Susan Montee urged elected state officials to work closely with the Department of Higher Education todetermine what future construction projects would most help Missouris colleges. She also said there needs to bemore unity among colleges over funding and recommended giving more power to the State Coordinating Boardof Higher Education, such as allowing it to enforce changes to degree programs."We have allowed political influence to come in and play way too high a figure," Montee said during a newsconference.Her audits focused on coordination within the Department of Higher Education and a 2007 college constructionplan.As examples of dislocation within higher education, Montee pointed to several schools that spend more than$100,000 each to lobby the Legislature and the method used to pick which building projects were included in the2007 construction plan.The review found that three priority construction projects for the Higher Education Department were not includedin the construction plan, but it did include 16 that were not considered a priority by the school or department.The college construction plan called for the Missouri Higher Education Loan Authority to sell assets and transfer$350 million over six years to the state. Of that, $305 million was to go for construction at four-year colleges anduniversities, $30 million was for community colleges and $15 million was for the Missouri TechnologyCorporation to attract high-tech companies.The loan authority made an initial $230 million payment in September 2007, but has delayed several paymentssince then because of the credit crunch and changes in federal laws.Gov. Jay Nixon, who as attorney general opposed the idea of tapping the student loan providers assets, in 2009suspended about a dozen projects because of funding shortages.In a written response to the audit, the state Office of Administration said the process for selecting the campusconstruction projects followed Missouris standard procedure for deciding what higher education building andrepair projects to complete. Lawmakers approved a budget and consulted with the Department of HigherEducation, lobbyists, constituents and others for information.The Office of Administration, which is led by a gubernatorial appointee, said it did not have reason to believefunding from the state loan authority would fall short. After payments slowed, the office said Nixon consulted theDepartment of Higher Education about what projects to delay but that the governor ultimately is responsible forthe decision.A spokeswoman for the Office of Administration declined further comment.Montees audit also questioned an administrative fee levied by the Missouri Technology Corp. that has divertedsome of the money it received through the 2007 plan.The quasi-state entity questioned the auditors procedures. The Missouri Technology Corp. also said the fund isa necessary accounting reserve and that the reserve level was set after a discussion with a national organizationfor non-profits specializing in economic development. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  6. 6. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 6 of 55Audits focus on college constructionprojects in Mo.Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio (2010-07-28)JEFFERSON CITY, MO. (ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO) - Two audits released today find that the MissouriDepartment of Higher Education has little say into how money is spent on building projects.The audits examined both the Coordinating Board for Higher Education and the Lewis and Clark DiscoveryInitiative. The latter was a project backed by former Republican Governor Matt Blunt to use profits from studentloans to fund construction projects on college campuses.Democratic State Auditor Susan Montee says the Department of Higher Education had little to no input intothose projects."The most outrageous thing here is that there were 16 projects, one-third of the money, were projects thatwerent on anyones priority list, including the institutions themselves," Montee said.Montee lays the blame squarely on lawmakers."The legislature is free to do whatever they want to without the benefit of all of the input and all of thecoordination that is being done," Montee said. "We have allowed political influence to come in and play way toohigh a figure in this."The Missouri Higher Education Loan Authority (MOHELA) has fallen behind on payments, and Governor JayNixon, who opposed the plan when he was Attorney General, has frozen some of the building projects.Montee is seeking re-election as State Auditor.St. Louis Public Radio also contacted Republican lawmakers for this story, but so far none have responded. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  7. 7. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 7 of 55Chuck Purgason left out of national Tea Party surgeBY TONY MESSENGER POST-DISPATCHJEFFERSON CITY • Will the real Tea Party candidate please stand up?The front-runner for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, Roy Blunt, is bringing in national Tea Partyfavorite Michelle Bachmann — a Minnesota congresswoman — to help him raise money and rally the troops thisweekend.That has caused 28 of the states loose collection of Tea Party groups to cry foul.While those groups havent endorsed anyone in Tuesdays primary, many of their members say underdog ChuckPurgason, a state senator, is the real Tea Party candidate."Most Tea Party supporters I know will be baffled by Michele Bachmann helping someone with a record like RoyBlunt before the primary vote," said Jedidiah Smith, a Tea party leader in Franklin County.Smith was one of the organizers of a Tea Party forum in the capital city early in the campaign in which Purgasonwon a straw poll. Blunt didnt attend.The Bachmann incident highlights Purgasons challenge: Unlike some other Tea Party candidates across thecountry, he has been unable to attract support — or money — from the Bachmanns of the world.Why? In part, because Blunt has spent the last decade crisscrossing the country raising money for them.The result is that Blunt has a massive war chest and a commanding lead in the polls, and he is expected to faceDemocrat Robin Carnahan, Missouris secretary of state, in the November general election. Carnahan faces onlytoken opposition on Tuesday.An easy Blunt win would put Missouri at odds with other states in what some are calling the political year of theTea Party movement.Blunt, 60, is a seven-term congressman from Springfield at a time when having experience in Washington isseen as a liability. Tea Party upstarts knocked out party regulars in Utah and Kentucky. And in Florida,Republican Gov. Charlie Crist chose to run for Senate as an independent rather than face a Tea Party-supportedcandidate.So what happened in Missouri?Blunt happened.The numbers tell a lopsided story:• Blunt, the clear front-runner, has raised more than $8 million. Purgason, the 50-year-old underdog from ruralHowell County, hasnt even cracked the six-figure mark.• In the state Senate, where Purgason serves, Blunt has the support of 20 of the 23 Republican members.Purgason has one.• According to a recent Post-Dispatch/KMOV (Channel 4) TV poll, 99 percent of the voters surveyed knew theBlunt name. More than 70 percent were unaware of Purgason.In politics, those are damning numbers. But Purgasons volunteer base hasnt given up."Were hopeful, and were doing everything we can," said Jim Schmidt of St. Charles, a Purgason volunteer whogot involved in politics last year through the Tea Party movement. "The rest of it is out of our hands."Schmidt was one of several Tea Party and Patriot group upstarts who filed to run for the open Senate seat beingvacated by Sen. Christopher "Kit" Bond, the dean of Missouri Republican politics. Schmidt dropped out to News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  8. 8. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 8 of 55support Purgason. Blunt still faces seven opponents on the Aug. 3 ballot. Of them, only Purgason has anyresonance with voters, said pollster Brad Coker, managing director of Mason-Dixon Polling & Research.Purgason lives in Caulfield, where he runs a game bird hatchery and hunting preserve. He was first elected tothe state House in 1996, and he has served two terms in the Senate. He was the sponsor of the controversial billin 2005 that cut Medicaid services in Missouri. Republicans have touted that vote as necessary to save thestates budget from out-of-control spending.In the poll Coker did for the Post-Dispatch this month, Blunt won the support of 62 percent of the Republicanvoters surveyed. Purgason won the backing of 13 percent of poll respondents."I like Purgason," said poll participant William Hindle, 73, of Florissant. "Basically, its the fact that hes not aninsider. I look at Blunt and I look at Carnahan as both being insiders."When Bond shocked the political world by announcing in early 2008 that he wouldnt seek re-election, the Bluntpolitical machine in southwest Missouri moved quickly to keep big names out of the race. Through surrogates,Blunt successfully urged other contenders to reconsider running a divisive primary against such a prodigiousfundraiser.But Purgason didnt get the memo.The conservative state senator decided that somebody had to remind voters of what he saw as Republicanexcesses in Congress while Blunt was a part of the leadership.From the beginning, Purgason knew his campaign was a long shot.He said as much in the Senate lounge to a group of editors and publishers listening to the two candidates kickoff their campaigns. As Blunt stood in the back of the room absorbing the volleys, Purgason blasted him for hissupport for the Troubled Assets Relief Program, or TARP, which has become widely criticized amongconservatives as a $700 billion bank bailout.Purgason also blamed Blunt for historic deficits while Republicans controlled Congress.When it was Blunts turn to speak, he didnt even say Purgasons name.Blunt has focused on convincing Republicans that he is their best chance to keep the seat in the GOP column;Purgason has been focused on telling Republicans that they need to get back to their roots.For Blunt, the message is: Keeping Bonds seat in GOP hands is essential, and to defeat a big name likeCarnahan, its going to take an equally big name.On the campaign trail, both candidates echo reliably Republican themes. Theyre opposed to President BarackObamas health care policies. They decry the nations increasing deficit. They want to cut spending.Purgason garnered some statewide headlines during the legislative special session this month, when he tried toblock a bill offering taxpayer incentives to lure Ford Motor Co. to expand its manufacturing plant near KansasCity.The state senator parlayed the publicity into an endorsement from Tea Party favorite "Joe the Plumber," aka JoeWurzelbacher, who put up television ads this week supporting Purgasons candidacy.Blunt has already run two television ads statewide, one that doesnt mention his experience in Washington, andanother that denounces Carnahan as a potential "rubber stamp" for Obama. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  9. 9. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 9 of 55Carnahan says ‘Hell no’ to $10B BP taxcreditSt. Louis Business JournalBP said it plans to cut its U.S. tax bill by $10 billion by deducting costs related to the oil spill.To which U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-Mo., replied: “Hell, no.”“Under no circumstances will BP be allowed to turn this massive disaster into a tax scheme that lets them pockettaxpayer dollars. Absolutely not,” Carnahan said in a statement Tuesday. “BP needs to take full responsibility forthe mess they have made. End of story.”Under U.S. corporate tax law, companies can take credits on up to 35 percent of their losses. BP disclosed itstax credit plans as part of its second-quarter earnings report, which showed that the company would take a$32.2 billion hit over the spill, according to The Washington Post.The credit for BP could mean that taxpayers will help pay for the $20 billion fund that BP created tocompensate affected industries for economic damages tied to the disaster. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  10. 10. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 10 of 55Opponents Rupp, Davis targeted bycomplaints to Ethics CommissionBY MARK SCHLINKMANN POST-DISPATCHState Sen. Scott Rupp and state Rep. Cynthia Davis - opponents in an increasingly bitter Republican primaryrace - are the targets of separate complaints filed in recent weeks with the Missouri Ethics Commission.Two anti-Rupp complaints were submitted by a Davis supporter, Burton Biermann of St. Peters. One alleges thata Rupp campaign finance report last year didnt explain the true purpose of some payments to consulting firms.The other concerns an e-mail sent last December to the Lincoln County GOP chairwoman by a state-paid Ruppaide stating that Davis shouldnt be allowed "to hijack the podium" at a county party dinner in February.The complaint against Davis, turned in earlier this month by Sarah Dawson of Columbia, Mo., questions whetherDavis improperly used campaign funds for public communications training - which Dawson considers personaluse. The complaint also alleges Davis campaign reports didnt disclose an Interstate 70 billboard promotingDavis.Dawson couldnt be reached for an interview. Davis called Dawson a Democrat who doesnt like her policies.Rupp, of Wentzville, and Davis, of OFallon, each deny that their campaigns did anything wrong.The Rupp campaign expenses at issue are payments made in March 2009 of $17,970 to ThompsonCommunications of Marshfield, Mo., and $12,000 to American Viewpoint of Alexandria, Va. Rupps report saysthe payments were for "grassroots" expenses but doesnt elaborate.Rupp said in an interview that the two firms have done various tasks dealing with communications, polling andrelated matters for him over the years. He said he didnt recall offhand the specific details of the two paymentsquestioned by Biermann but that the phrase "grassroots" was an accurate summary.He said that means "getting the message out on the local level to the voting public in your area" andsummarizes the two firms activities for him.The other anti-Rupp complaint concerns an e-mail sent by Beverly Steiniger, who Rupp says works parttime ashis official Senate aide in Lincoln County.The e-mail also notes that the recipient, county GOP chairwoman Carol Wessel Boyer, had been named to astate board dealing with prisons. The e-mail says Wessel Boyer "as a political appointee of Sen. Rupps" shouldbe "sensitive" to Rupps feelings.Biermann contended that Steiniger as a Senate employee is forbidden from using her state job to engage inpolitical activity.He also argued that she violated conflict-of-interest statutes by indicating to Wessel Boyer that her "appointmentcame with strings attached that require all her behavior to be focused" on helping Rupps re-election efforts.In response, Rupp said theres nothing in the law that prevents a Senate employee from doing partisan politicalthings on personal time. Rupp said Steiniger sent the e-mail "on her own time" using her personal e-mailaddress.Steiniger said her remarks about hijacking the podium doesnt mean she was trying to get Wessel Boyer to keepDavis from speaking and that Davis indeed was invited to do so.Steiniger said it was to make the point that Davis shouldnt be allowed to make derogatory comments aboutRupp at the dinner. Steineger said Davis had done so at a similar dinner in early 2009. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  11. 11. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 11 of 55Rupp said the e-mails reference to a political appointment refers to Wessel Boyers selection in 2008 by then-Gov. Matt Blunt to an advisory committee on corrections. Rupp said as Wessel Boyers home-district senator heendorsed the appointment and sponsored her for Senate confirmation. Wessel Boyer could not be reached forcomment.The complaint against Davis concerns a reference on one of her reports to spending $5,280 to Broadcast Centerin St. Louis for education.Dawson, who submitted the complaint, argued in a letter to the commission that furthering "ones personal andprofessional career" through education isnt a permissible use for campaign funds under state law. She alsoquestioned the amount cited.Davis said the expense was justified because "one of the most vital functions of my office is communication withmy constituents." She said she was trained by Broadcast Center in speaking clearly and being concise and usedthat knowledge to help produce radio commercials in the campaign. She said the $5,280 price was accurate.Regarding the billboard, which went up before she became a Senate candidate, Davis said she in fact hadreferred to it on a campaign finance report. Her husband, Bernie Davis, said the billboard is owned by HighwayMedia - a company that the two own.Bernie Davis said a $2,100 in-kind donation listed in December 2009 as going from Cynthia Davis to hercampaign probably was the one relating to the billboard. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  12. 12. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 12 of 55Public defenders threaten to refuse St.Louis County casesBY HEATHER RATCLIFFE POST-DISPATCHST. LOUIS COUNTY • Officials of Missouris public defender system warned the countys chief judge andprosecutor Wednesday that they have begun steps to refuse to take new criminal cases here. They said they areoverworked and lack time to provide effective counsel.The move was met with an angry rebuke from Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch, who claimed, "Its acontrived issue made up to get more money out of the Legislature and less work for themselves."Peter Sterling, general counsel for the public defender system, said its St. Louis County office worked at 160percent of its capacity in June. He promised to provide details before moving forward with a shutdown, and saidhe believes prosecutors will come to see his side.The agency has long complained of underfunding.McCulloch "is never going to be satisfied with our numbers or the logic of the public defenders office," Sterlingsaid. "My interest is moving forward, whether (McCulloch) is in agreement or not."Presiding Judge John Ross said the judges are open to discussion. "Any fix on this is going to be a lot of littlethings, and Im not hearing you make any suggestions," he told the visiting defenders officials from JeffersonCity. "The judges believe unanimously that we have a constitutional authority to make sure people areadequately represented."St. Louis County is the defenders third battleground. Last week, they closed the offices in Troy, Mo., andSpringfield to new cases through the end of July. In both instances, the director of the Missouri State PublicDefender System filed a "certification of limited availability" with the presiding judges. That process is authorizedin rules set by the systems governing commission.The closing rule applies if an office exceeds maximum caseload standards for three consecutive months.At least one judge in Christian County overruled the director and forced a public defense attorney to take a newcase. Sterling said that can be appealed to a higher court.McCulloch said he wants to see real statistics and lists of case numbers before court officials even begin talkingabout ways to avoid a shutdown. "They are counting their cases in some magical way," he said. "Im notconvinced that anyone is chronically overworked in the criminal justice system in St. Louis County."Sterling said the only options available are for prosecutors to waive jail time on certain offenses, so thedefendants wouldnt need lawyers, or for judges to appoint private attorneys to represent the indigent."No circuit or any other place has been able to come up with options other than these," Sterling said.Christian County Prosecutor Ron Cleek said nearly a year of discussions broke down last week. "We triedeverything in the world to try to assist them to make it work," he said. "They didnt come up with options. Theyjust said, This is what were going to do."Cleek said criminal cases will be put on hold and accumulate until the issue is resolved.Sterling said virtually every public defender office in the state is overworked, and said more shutdowns will bedeclared as administrators visit the circuits.McCulloch complained that public defenders set their own workloads and follow their own rules. He said he hasasked the state auditors office to examine the system. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  13. 13. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 13 of 55Criticizing the defenders, McCulloch complained, "Id fire one of my attorneys if they left at 5 oclock every dayand there was still work to be done." He added, "You just do what you need to do to represent your client."He noted that public defenders handle about 28 percent of his countys criminal cases, while his staff of notmany more lawyers prosecutes 100 percent.Defenders in Lincoln County have not yet refused any cases, but prosecutor G. John Richards said he expects itsoon. He told a reporter that defenders have said they can only handle 600-odd hours worth of cases, which is400 fewer hours than they had in May.He said the public defenders calculate their hours based on a 30-hour workweek. "Theres not any lawyer in thisstate, either in the prosecutors office or in private practice, that works a 30-hour week," Richards complained.Richards said the issue may be headed for the appellate courts unless judges are willing to appoint privatelawyers to handle criminal cases for free. He said that raises another issue: "Can you compel someone to take acase?"Christine Byers and Robert Patrick of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  14. 14. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 14 of 55Nixon seeks disaster fundsMost area counties included in request for flood, storm recoveryBy St. Joseph News-PressWednesday, July 28, 2010 at 1:24 p.m.A number of Northwest Missouri counties have been included in a request for federal disaster assistance tospeed recovery from flooding and storms in the region.Gov. Jay Nixon wrote to President Obama, it was announced Wednesday morning, to seek public assistance forAndrew, Atchison, Buchanan, Caldwell, Clinton, Daviess, DeKalb, Gentry, Grundy, Harrison, Holt, Livingston,Mercer, Nodaway and Worth counties, among others.A request for individual assistance went to the president for the counties of Andrew, Buchanan, Daviess, Holtand Livingston, among others elsewhere in the state.The governor also wrote to Tom Vilsack, the U.S. secretary of agriculture, to name 55 Missouri counties asprimary disaster areas. Such a designation allows assistance for agriculture operations from the federal FarmService Agency.Among the counties cited for agricultural hardship and losses are: Andrew, Caldwell, Daviess, DeKalb, Gentry,Grundy, Harrison, Holt, Livingston, Mercer, Platte and Worth.“Since the spring, Missouri communities have been hit by flooding, strong winds and excessive rainfall whichhave left severe damage in their wake,” Mr. Nixon said.“I am asking the President to issue a major disaster declaration so that counties, local governments andindividuals that have sustained severe damage because of the storms and flooding will have the resources torebuild and recover.” News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  15. 15. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 15 of 55Mo. AG plans meeting to discuss Lake ofOzarksJEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- The Missouri attorney generals office plans a two-day meeting to discuss waterquality issues at the Lake of the Ozarks.Attorney General Chris Koster says next months meeting will look at scientific, technical and regulatorychallenges at the sprawling mid-Missouri recreation area. Water quality at the Lake of the Ozarks has become aprominent issue after revelations last year that the release of reports of high E. coli bacteria were delayed.Koster says the long-term health of the Lake of the Ozarks demands that numerous issues be addressed.The meeting is scheduled for Aug. 17-18 at Tan-Tar-A Resort, on the lake. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  16. 16. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 16 of 55MOHELA grants $30 million in scholarshipsto offset Access Missouri cutsCOLUMBIA MISSOURIAN By Naomi StevensJuly 28, 2010 | 5:50 p.m. CDTCOLUMBIA — The states largest need-based scholarship program now has an additional $30 million todistribute to colleges and universities in Missouri.The Missouri Higher Education Loan Authority, or MOHELA, pledged $30 million in scholarship money to thestate in June, but the decision to allocate the funds through the Access Missouri program was announced lastweek. This money helps offset the $50 million cut from the Access Missouri program when Gov. Jay Nixonsigned the new budget in June.The money is planned to be distributed through Access Missouri to make the process simple for students. The$30 million only applies to the 2010-11 academic year.“There is no guarantee, or no expectation, I should say, that this will happen again, that MOHELA will have thefunds to do this again,” Leroy Wade, Missouri Department of Higher Education assistant commissioner forfinancial assistance said. “So it is a one-time event in that sense.”Although MOHELA’s pledge brings Access Missouri’s need-based scholarship fund to a total of $60 million, anincrease in needy students and the overall reduction in funds means the size of the scholarships given out couldbe smaller than whats mandated by a 2007 state law.More than 102,000 students qualify for Access Missouri scholarships this academic year, compared to 86,000eligible students in 2009-10, according to a release from the Missouri Department of Higher Education. TheMissouri Department of Higher Education plans to re-evaluate award levels before the fall semester begins andagain in December. Award levels could be adjusted at either point to remain on budget, the news release said.Before Access Missouri provided more exact amounts of available funds, MUs financial aid department had tomake rougher estimates of award levels. While the numbers could still change, the announcement of the newfunds allowed university officials to have a clearer picture of what students could receive.At MU, all aid awards are currently estimated at $950 — a change that affects students differently.“Returning students (at MU) will be getting about $450 more than we had originally assumed,” Christian Basi,associate director for the MU News Bureau, said.However, Access Missouris aid for MU freshmen is now $380 less than the average of $1,330 originallyestimated.Students with questions regarding their financial aid should contact the financial aid department directly, Basisaid. The offices number is 882-7506. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  17. 17. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 17 of 55State auditor’s report flags concerns overplans for MOHELA fundsCOLUMBIA DAILY TRIBUNE By Janese SilveyWednesday, July 28, 2010The state auditor’s office today was set to release a report criticizing management of the Lewis and ClarkDiscovery Initiative, a plan to use Missouri Higher Education Loan Authority assets to fund capital improvementprojects on college campuses.More than $107 million in university building projects remained unfunded as of June 2009, the end of the two-year audit period. Of that pool, more than $73.8 million were University of Missouri System projects.The Tribune reviewed an advance copy of the report, expected to be made public during a news conference inAuditor Susan Montee’s office late this morning.The Lewis and Clark initiative, unveiled by former Gov. Matt Blunt in 2006, aimed to transfer $350 million to theinitiative from MOHELA over a six-year period. MOHELA made an initial $230 million transfer in 2007 and a fewpartial payments over the next two years.As of June 2009, MOHELA was behind in payments by $21 million, the audit says.The report criticizes the Office of Administration for not telling universities about the potential shortfall andcontinuing to reimburse institutions for projects using limited funds in the discovery initiative coffers. But theOffice of Administration had no indication from MOHELA that payments would not be made on schedule, theoffice responded in the report.Auditors also flagged Lewis and Clark funding allocated to the Missouri Technology Corp., a not-for-profitcorporation established in 1994 to promote science and technology. Much of the audit report is an exchangebetween auditors and the corporation as to whether MTC appropriately used its $15 million.Montee also was expected today to discuss an audit of the Missouri Department of Higher Education. That auditincludes recommendations that the department pursue a legislative change that would grant the CoordinatingBoard for Higher Education the authority to change or eliminate degree programs at colleges and universities. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  18. 18. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 18 of 55Missouri auditors review critical ofMOHELA disbursements, River CampusfundingThursday, July 29, 2010SE MISSOURIAN From staff and wire reportsThe state Department of Higher Education should have been more involved in picking projects for a collegeconstruction program and additional coordination is needed among colleges, according to reviews releasedWednesday by the state auditors office.Auditor Susan Montee urged elected state officials to work closely with the Department of Higher Education todetermine what future construction projects would most help Missouris colleges. She also said there needs to bemore unity among colleges over funding and recommended giving more power to the State Coordinating Boardof Higher Education, such as allowing it to enforce changes to degree programs."We have allowed political influence to come in and play way too high a figure," Montee said during a newsconference in Jefferson City, Mo.Montee was also critical of the funding reimbursements for Southeast Missouri State Universitys River Campus.The university received $17.2 million in state funds for the project after it was completed to reimburse theuniversity for bonds that had been issued. The audit recommended the legislature not appropriate funds forprojects that are already complete.The River Campus opened in August 2007. According to the review, Southeast received the bulk of its fundsduring fiscal years 2008 and 2009, while other universities were forced to halt projects. City and federal funds aswell as private donations helped fund the $50 million project.The audits focused on coordination within the Department of Higher Education and a 2007 college constructionplan.Montee pointed to several schools that spend more than $100,000 each to lobby the legislature and the methodused to pick which building projects were included in the 2007 construction plan.The review found that three priority construction projects for the Department of Higher Education were notincluded in the plan, but it did include 16 that were not considered a priority by the school or department.The plan lists four Southeast projects, including the Autism Center for Diagnosis and Treatment. Of the four, theRiver Campus was the only project that received a funding recommendation from the coordinating board,according to the audit.Every year, universities submit capital requests to the Department of Higher Education. Southeasts current toprequests are science facilities and improvements to Academic Hall, which houses many of the Southeastsadministrative offices. The university is considering issuing $40 million in bonds to fund those projects and otherdeferred maintenance.The states college construction plan called for the Missouri Higher Education Loan Authority to sell assets andtransfer $350 million over six years to the state. Of that, $305 million was to go for construction at four-yearcolleges and universities, $30 million was for community colleges and $15 million was for the MissouriTechnology Corp. to attract high-tech companies.The loan authority made an initial $230 million payment in September 2007 but has delayed several paymentssince then because of the credit crunch and changes in federal laws. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  19. 19. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 19 of 55Gov. Jay Nixon in 2009 suspended about a dozen projects because of funding shortages.Montee said projects were not prioritized to organize funding allocations. Southeast received a large sum of itsfunding for the already-constructed River Campus as money started running short, while other projects couldhave been started."The ones that suffered were the ones that were not as far along," she said in an interview. A business incubatorfor Southeast was one of the projects that never got off the ground.In a written response to the audit, the state Office of Administration said the process for selecting the campusconstruction projects followed Missouris standard procedure for deciding what higher education building andrepair projects to complete. Lawmakers approved a budget and consulted with the Department of HigherEducation, lobbyists, constituents and others for information.The Office of Administration, which is led by a gubernatorial appointee, said it did not have reason to believefunding from the state loan authority would fall short. After payments slowed, the office said Nixon consulted theDepartment of Higher Education about what projects to delay but that the governor ultimately is responsible forthe decision.A spokeswoman for the Office of Administration declined further comment.Montees audit also questioned an administrative fee levied by the Missouri Technology Corp. that has divertedsome of the money it received through the 2007 plan.The quasi-state entity questioned the auditors procedures. The Missouri Technology Corp. also said the fund isa necessary accounting reserve and that the reserve level was set after a discussion with a national organizationfor non-profits specializing in economic development.Staff writer Alaina Busch contributed to this report. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  20. 20. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 20 of 55Gaming Commission hits Lumiere Placewith $50,000 fineBY VIRGINIA YOUNG • POST-DISPATCHJEFFERSON CITY -- Las Vegas-based Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. came up the loser this morning at theMissouri Gaming Commission.State regulators voted to slap the company with a $50,000 fine for repeated violations of state rules at theLumiere Place casino in downtown St. Louis.A gaming commission audit covering June 1, 2008 through Jan. 31, 2010, found what the staff called 10"significant" violations that mirrored violations discovered during an earlier audit.They included:-- Failing to change the total revenue figure at the bottom of the page of reports when adjustments were made inline items.-- Letting a dealer -- instead of a table games supervisor -- inspect the dice at the close of craps games.-- Exchanging chips between cashier carts without requiring any documentation.-- Failing to scan all customer coupons or enter the validation numbers manually into the cashier system.While some of the problems may sound like minor slip-ups, they spurred harsh criticism from commissioners,who have broad authority to enforce the rules.Chairman Jim Mathewson warned Pinnacle not to blame the violations on managers transferring to thecompanys new River City Casino in south St. Louis County."Dont come back and tell us it was because of the move," Mathewson said, "because I dont think thatsacceptable."Pinnacle does not plan to appeal the disciplinary action, said spokesman Mack Bradley. He said the companyhad no comment on regulatory matters. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  21. 21. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 21 of 55GAO to investigate John CochranBrian KellyWASHINGTON D.C. (KMOX)- Congress’ investigative arm is joining the effort to get to the bottom of theimproperly cleaned dental equipment at the John Cochran VA Medical Center in St. Louis , that may haveexposed nearly two thousand veterans to HIV and Hepatitis.Word came down Wednesday, that the Government Accountability office is now including the case in itsinvestigation into similar incidents at other VA Medical Centers. Missouri Congressman Russ Carnahan says the GAO has the teeth to cut through the red tape to get someanswers the VA is not providing now.Carnahan says local and federal VA officials have been giving “incomplete answers.” He cites last week’s reportthat 1,441 affected veterans had been tested. The VA reported that 809 had tested negative, but has not yetprovided the results on the other 335.He says he’s talked to two veterans who have tested positive for Hepatitis, but they don’t know if they contractedit at John Cochran.He does credit the VA wth offering free testing of the spouses and partners of the veterans at risk and assignindividual liasons to work with the affected veterans.Carnahan says all testing should be completed in September. He says the VA’s internal investigation should alsobe completed by then. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  22. 22. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 22 of 55Massive leak renews debate on intelligencesharingPosted Wednesday, Jul. 28, 2010By Kimberly DozierThe Associated PressWASHINGTON -- Dismayed by the massive war-documents leak, intelligence experts are raising alarms thatpost-9-11 changes promoting information sharing have made it too easy to lose control of the nations secrets.Some intelligence veterans say its time to rethink how widely classified material is shared at lower levels or tostep up monitoring of the people who are given access."Frankly, we all knew this was going to happen," says former CIA Director Michael Hayden. He predicts "a newemphasis on protecting."The intelligence failures that led to the attacks of 9-11 were blamed on government agencies hoardinginformation instead of sharing it, missing crucial clues that could have headed off al Qaedas strikes.The changes that reduced this kind of information "stovepiping" have produced the opposite problem --amassing so much data that officials complain that its hard to make sense of it and, as the WikiLeaks incidentshows, keep it secret.Intelligence officials and outside experts say agency chiefs may push to limit access to electronic "portals" thathave provided growing data access to intelligence officers, diplomats and troops worldwide.Others predict tighter scrutiny by an administration that has already pushed aggressively to investigate andprosecute leakers.On the other hand, some lawmakers on Capitol Hill worry that the leaking incident will give the nations 16intelligence agencies an excuse to go back to the old ways of holding back information as "too sensitive" to beshared."The intelligence community has a long way to go in information sharing," says Sen. Kit Bond of Missouri, topRepublican on the Senate Intelligence Committee. "If these leaks lead to even more stovepipes," as in limitingaccess to data to only certain analysts or agencies, "it would be yet another devastating result of this betrayal,"he said.In London, WikiLeaks editor-in-chief claims his organization doesnt know who sent it some 91,000 secret U.S.military documents, telling journalists that the website was set up to hide the source of its data from those whoreceive it.Julian Assange didnt say whether he meant he had no idea who leaked the documents or whether hisorganization simply could not be sure. But he did say the added layer of secrecy helps protect the sites sourcesfrom spy agencies and hostile corporations."We never know the source of the leak," he told journalists late Tuesday.Suspicion for the WikiLeaks document dump centers on Spc. Bradley Manning, of Potomac, Md., a 22-year-oldsoldier who is being detained in Kuwait, charged with "mishandling and leaking classified data."Manning was blamed for leaking a classified helicopter cockpit video of a 2007 firefight in Baghdad.Detained after he bragged of providing classified material to WikiLeaks, Manning was charged with accessingwhat were described as more than 150,000 State Department cables, which have yet to surface. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  23. 23. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 23 of 55One U.S. official who has examined some of the WikiLeaks documents said everything he had seen could havebeen obtained by Manning by surfing a Defense Department intranet system known as the "SIPRNet," or SecretInternet Protocol Router Network.Intelligence analysts like Manning and even troops in the field can access military field reports from Iraq orAfghanistan, or State Department sites, or even some intelligence sites. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  24. 24. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 24 of 55BLOG ZONEVeterans for Peace Praises WikiLeaks; St.Louis Group Wants Medal for InformantRIVERFRONT TIMES By Chad Garrison, Wed., Jul. 28 2010 @ 12:15PMUpdated 4:00 p.m. with comments from Veterans for Peace president.By now youve certainly heard how the website WikiLeaks this week released some 91,000 classified and/orsensitive military reports detailing the failures of the war in Afghanistan.In Washington, the release of the documents is drawing comparisons to the Pentagon Papers and has thePentagon and the Obama administration scrambling save face on the war. Here in St. Louis, Veterans for Peace(headquartered in Clayton) is taking another stand all together. Its 7,000 members nationwide hope the leak willignite greater resistance to what it refers to as an "illegal and immoral" war. More than that, Veterans for Peacewant the person who leaked the information to get a medal.Below are the somewhat incendiary comments (especially if youre a supporter of the war) that Veterans forPeace president Mike Ferner posted on the organizations website yesterday:Today the war in Afghanistan begins to crumble under the weight of government lies at home and criminalbehavior on the battlefield.Since the beginning of the war in Afghanistan nine years ago, Veterans For Peace has been waiting for the daywhen internal documents would reveal what we have known all along -- this war is illegal, immoral and we mustadd, it is bankrupting our nation at a time when millions of Americans have been thrown out of work and thrownout of their homes.Neither Wikileaks nor the soldier or soldiers who divulged the documents should be prosecuted for revealing thisinformation. We should give them a medal.Now that the rotten truth of the war has been dug out of government vaults and brought to light - the murder ofcivilians, the inexcusable deaths and injuries of our troops, the knife to the heart of every soldiers familymember, the fact that "winning" in Afghanistan is meaningless, the outrage of our jobless and homeless astrillions are spent on war and bank bailouts - the most important question is, "what will we do about it?"We can be sidetracked by watching the 24-hour news cycle regurgitate Obama administration denials and"expert" opinions. Or every single one of us can look in the mirror tomorrow morning and see the personresponsible for bringing this war to an end. It really is as simple as that. We know this war is wrong. Now wehave official proof. When will we do something?If we have complained, we must write a letter. If weve written a letter, we must get into the streets. If wevemarched in the streets we must sit down in them. If weve been to our representatives district offices, we mustreturn and not leave until they stop funding the war. If weve talked to our co-workers we must call in sick, slowdown production, urge our union to call a strike.Government can only function with the consent of the governed. We must withdraw our consent at everyopportunity until this war is ended, the troops are brought home and we start to rebuild our nation. That is ourresponsibility and our mission.As of today, no American can say, "I didnt know what was happening." Now each and every citizen knows. Nowwe must act like citizens and stop this war. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  25. 25. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 25 of 55This afternoon Daily RFT spoke with Ferner by phone. Heres what he had to say in response to some of ourqueries.Daily RFT: You say the source should be given a medal, but didnt he (or she) commit treason by leaking thisinformation?Ferner: What we find too often with classified information is that the government isnt trying to hide it from itsenemies, its trying to hide it from its citizens. In that sense, yes, the person who leaked this has done a publicservice. Like the Pentagon Papers helped to end the Vietnam War, I believe this information could help end thewar in Afghanistan.How is the war like a "knife to the heart of families"?Because theyre realizing now that its illegitimate their family members are losing their lives -- for what?Why -- in your mind -- is the war illegal?Because Bush didnt have U.N. approval to launch war. Therefore this is a war of aggression. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  26. 26. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 26 of 55Robin Carnahan gets personal, comparingthe current and "old" Roy BluntBy Jo Mannies, Beacon Political ReporterUpdated 10:36 pm Wed., 07.28.10Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan renewed her attacks today on her best-known Republican rival forthe U.S. Senate -- U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt -- by touting him as part of the "culture of corruption in Washington" thatshe says is hurting average Missourians and small businesses.Her backdrop was Lubeleys Bakery in Marlborough, where dozens of South County Democrats munched oncookies while Carnahan attempted to crumble Blunts character.She challenged Blunts recent assertion that he has never met convicted lobbyist Jack Abramoff, by citingreports that Blunt was among eight people who were on a special "friends of the owner" list at an Abramoff-owned restaurant, meaning that Blunt got free meals.She also cited Blunts status as Congress top recipient of lobbyist donations in 2009, and the second-highestrecipient of money from corporate political action committees, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, anonpartisan group that monitors campaign donations.Carnahans campaign also noted that two of Blunts adult children and his wife are lobbyists, or were recentlyemployed as such.(A Blunt spokesman reinterated this evening that "Roy Blunt never met with Jack Abramoff...did not know he wason any list at any restaurant, and he never received anything for free.""With respect to lobbyists," the Blunt spokesman continued, "two of Robin Carnahans brothers were statelobbyists when her father was governor and she has taken over $1 million from lobbyists and special interests."Carnahan also got personal, by saying that the Roy Blunt whos been in Washington for 14 years isnt the sameman as the Roy Blunt who ran her office for eight years, and who made an unsuccessful bid for governor in1992.The old Roy Blunt, she said, embraced calls for ethics reforms and transparency regarding lobbyists dealingswith public figures.As a member of Congress, said Carnahan, Blunts current close ties to lobbyists exemplify what she wanted tooutlaw, if she wins election this fall."Its sad, really," she said, referring to what she viewed as a change in Blunts ethics.Carnahans chief purpose during her stop at the bakery was to outline some of her proposals for curbing theinfluence of lobbyists in Washington. Among other things, she is calling for:-- Permanently barring members of Congress from ever working as lobbyists, and imposing a six-year waitingperiod on former members of congressional staffs.-- Requiring public notice, with details, of all meetings between members of Congress and lobbyists.-- Barring the use of "war rooms" in the U.S. Capitol, where lobbyists and lawmakers can meet to discusslegislation.-- Barring "leadership political-action committees" by members of Congress.-- Requiring campaign donations to be reported monthly, instead of quarterly.-- Barring members of Congress of taking donations from firms or individuals under investigation. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  27. 27. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 27 of 55-- Bar the use of congressional "earmarks" by members of Congress, who use their influence to get money"earmarked" for preferred causes, groups or federal functions.-- Stiffening the congressional ethics rules, and expanding the authoritiy of the Office of Congressional Ethics.Afterward, Carnahan told reporters that she was pressing such issues because she believes it was the rightthing to do. "Im not talking about this because it resonates with people, " Carnahan said, in response to a queryas whether such proposals did or did not "resonate" with the public.She also responded to observations by Blunt and other Republicans that some of her proposals would affect herbrother, U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis.Referrring to her sibling, Robin Carnahan replied, "Some things we agree on, and some things we dont."She also reaffirmed her overall support for the new federal health care law, altthough Carnahan emphasized thatshe disagreed with some provisions in the legislation and thought some changes might be needed."There was way too much slipped into that health care bill," she said, but then added that keeping the nationshealth care system as it has been is "unsustainable" and too beneficial to insurance companies, at the expenseof the public.Lubeley owner Helen Lubeley Murray listened to some of what Carnahan had to say. Murray said afterwardthat the owners had allowed the Carnahan event as "a favor to a family friend," and were pleased to be hosts.But Murray emphasized that the bakerys OK should not be construed as a political endorsement.Murray said that her familys political decisions hinge largely on one issue that Carnahan did not mention duringtodays visit. "Were staunch pro-life people," she said.Murray added that she was aware that Carnahan supports abortion rights. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  28. 28. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 28 of 55The Obama-Pelosi event...By: John Bresnahan and Glenn ThrushJuly 29, 2010 04:26 AM EDTPresident Barack Obama’s endless summer of fundraising is heating up — with the addition of a big-moneyAugust house party to help out House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s imperiled Democrats, POLITICO has learned.Obama plans to headline an Aug. 16 fundraiser for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in LosAngeles — the first such appearance by the president on behalf of Pelosi since White House press secretaryRobert Gibbs rankled House Democrats by suggesting they could lose their majority.The commitment to appear with Pelosi in LA — along with a signoff on an as-yet unscheduled Obama-DCCCfete — followed a White House meeting between Pelosi and Obama, according to Democratic insiders.Obama’s ever-widening midterm fundraising offensive comes at a time when his approval numbers are at lowebb, with many Democratic candidates across the country more eager for his cash-raising efforts than his actualpresence in their districts.Mike Kelley, the former executive director of the Missouri Democratic Party, said Obama is “personally lesstoxic” than his abysmal 34 percent approval rating in the Show-Me State would indicate. Still, he said thatDemocratic Senate candidate Robin Carnahan “has probably seen enough of him this year” after a July 8presidential visit that was taped by Republicans and turned into an ad.“But that doesn’t mean [Obama] can’t be extremely helpful when it comes to fundraising,” he added.Despite such headwinds, the president and his White House advisers — all battle-hardened 2008 campaignhands — are attacking the 2010 midterms with real verve, in part to buck up battered congressional Democrats,in part to road-test messages for Obama’s looming 2012 campaign, but ultimately because the commander inchief still gets a huge buzz from campaigning.In fact, Obama was so fired up after a campaign event for Nevada Sen. Harry Reid in Las Vegas last month, hesurprised the majority leader backstage with what amounted to a war whoop for Democrats in the midterms.“They have been running a campaign for 18 months,” Obama said of congressional Republicans, according to aperson who witnessed the exchange. “But they forget: We know how to win elections, too.”Obama, according to a Democratic source, was so fired up after the Reid event, he sped back to his hotel for abeer and a poker game.And if he can no longer count on the unalloyed adoration of huge crowds he enjoyed in 2008, he’s still the party’sbiggest cash draw.The LA fundraiser, which will take place at the home of Marilyn and John Wells, costs $2,500 per person toattend, although “co-hosts” will have to shell out as much $30,400 each, the maximum allowable contribution bya donor to a national party committee per year.In a nod, perhaps, to Obama, no donations from registered lobbyists or lobbyists for foreign governments will beaccepted for the event.The West Coast swing is likely to include other events, only one of which has thus far been made public: afundraiser for Washington Democratic Sen. Patty Murray, who is facing a daunting challenge from Republicansvying to challenge her.Even as he hits the road, Obama’s internal ’10 team — led by senior adviser David Axelrod, chief of staff RahmEmanuel and Emanuel deputy Jim Messina — are planning a slate of other fundraisers, which are likely toinclude fresh trips to New York and Florida to support candidates such as Senate hopeful Rep. Kendrick Meek. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  29. 29. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 29 of 55“It’s not a matter of whether he’s coming to Florida, but when,” says Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.).The brain trust met last week in the White House to discuss a whole range of events with DCCC Chairman ChrisVan Hollen, who was mum on the details other than to say, “They are definitely energized.”The energy is reflected in a schedule that is fast filling up with fundraising stops, including the pair of fundraisershe hosted in Manhattan on Wednesday night.POLITICO reported last week that Obama was about to kick off a wave of fundraising and “donor maintenance”events over the next few weeks in Washington, D.C., New York City, Chicago and Texas. These events willbenefit the Democratic National Committee, Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and Alexi Giannoulias,who is running for the Illinois Senate seat that Obama vacated when he moved into the White House.The capstone of the minitour will be two events in Chicago on Aug. 5 to celebrate Obama’s 49th birthday.Yet even as the White House is gearing up for an even more hyperactive fall fundraising drive, Obama and HillDemocrats are eyeing each other uneasily and making commitments only after careful consideration.During the 2006 midterms, when President George W. Bush was electoral poison to Republicans, Obama was ahuge draw for Democratic candidates, relegating Hillary Clinton to the second tier. And while things aren’t quiteBush bad, 18 months of divisive governing have dulled Obama’s luster, even among the loyal liberal base.Democrats in battleground states like Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana and Pennsylvania want his fundraising morethan his presence, according to Democratic officials.Pennsylvania Rep. Joe Sestak, the Democratic candidate for Senate initially spurned by the president’s team,says he’d rather have Michelle Obama appear on his behalf instead of her husband.For his part, Obama has been reluctant to commit his time and reputation to candidates who don’t pass musterwhen it comes to the quality of campaigns or fundraising clout.“His visit can get people excited, [but] a lot of these voters who came out for the first time in ’08 [for Obama], ...they have to have some affection for the [local] candidate,” said Obama political adviser David Plouffe, speakingon a conference call earlier this week.One such candidate who hasn’t quite proven his mettle, according to Democratic operatives, is Louisiana Rep.Charlie Melancon, who is running a competitive race against incumbent GOP Sen. David Vitter — but haslagged in fundraising.On the flip side is Giannoulias, who was shunned by the White House for much of the spring as he coped withthe collapse of his family’s troubled bank. But Giannoulias’s recovery in recent polls — coupled with a series ofserious unforced errors by opponent GOP Rep. Mark Kirk, has persuaded the White House to go all in, despiteGiannoulias’s less-than-stellar fundraising.“I’m helping the White House where I can — I’ve been out raising money for the past few weeks,” said Plouffe,Obama’s 2008 campaign manager. “We have real, real affection and faith in him and his campaign team. ... I’mimpressed by the fact that, despite all the attacks, ... Alexi’s in a position to win this race. He can have a strongclosing three months here.” News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  30. 30. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 30 of 55Russ Carnahan sells "Royal Nuisance, butboat continues to be a political painBy Jo Mannies, Beacon Political ReporterPOSTED 5:11 PM WED., 07.28.10The "Attractive Nuisance may be gone, but the controversy continues surrounding the non-working cabincruiser by that name that had been co-owned by U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis.Carnahan aides confirmed this afternoon that Carnahan and three other co-owners -- Aldermanic PresidentLewis Reed and the two politicians wives -- succeeded in selling the boat last month. It had been on the blockfor two years, aides say. It also has been non-working for most of that time, said campaign spokeswomanAngela BarrancoThe boat sold for $11,500, with each partner receiving $2,875, Barranco said.No back taxes were owed or paid, she added.One of Carnahans GOP rivals, local lawyer Ed Martin, has been claiming for weeks that taxes may have beenowed, even if Carnahan lived in St. Louis and the vessel was moored in Alton. Martin had held a newsconference on the matter Wednesday, before learning of the boats sale. He declined to take credit for itsdeparture.Barranco made clear that Carnahan is sick of the controversy. "This is not a story but a charade - the boat hasbeen for sale for over two years and there are no taxes owed, she said "As first mate for the BluntAdministration, Ed Martins Memogate scandal cost Missouri taxpayers over $2.4 million. Ed Martins using thisas a smokescreen to hide his resignation from public service."She is referrring to the controversy that Carnahan hopes to keep afloat: Martins old job as chief of staff to then-Gov. Matt Blunt, and Martins involvement in a dispute -- which spawned lawsuits -- over the offices routinedestruction of e-mails that critics said needed to be preserved under the states laws governing open records andrecord preservation. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  31. 31. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 31 of 55Prop C supporters predict victory, blasthospital group for its oppositionBy Jo Mannies, Beacon Political ReporterPosted 11:53 pm Wed., 07.28.10State Sen. Jane Cunningham credited a higher power Wednesday with helping to build the apparent strongpublic support for Proposition C, the ballot proposal to seeks to exempt Missouri from the health care mandatescontained in the new health care law."I do believe that God interferes in the affairs of men, said Cunningham, R-Chesterfield, during a fundraisingrally Wednesday night in St. Charles aimed at promoting the measures passage in next Tuesdays statewideelection.Cunningham and other legislative leaders -- including state Sen. Jim Lembke, R-Lemay, and state Reps. TimJones, R-Eureka, and Brian Nieves, R-Washington -- told the crowd of several hundred that money was pouringin for a final campaign blitz in favor of the measure.The quartet repeated their longstanding assertion that the federal health care mandates violate states rights,limit personal freedom, and are too costly.Jones was particularly critical of new opposition efforts by the Missouri Hospital Association, which has posted a"fact sheet" on its web site that warns that if Proposition C is passed and upheld by the courts, "Missourihospitals would be significantly disadvantaged."The association also has sent out a mailer critical of Proposition C.The legislator accused the associations members of caring only "about what they are going to lose from thebottom line."Jones said that he has heard from physicians who support Proposition C. "Ill take the word of my doctor any dayover an administrator in a suit, he said, touching off cheers.But the crowd appeared most moved by Cunninghams dermatologist, Dr. George Hruza, who recounted onceagain how, as a child in what was formerly Czechoslovakia, his tonsils were removed without anesthesiabecause, Hruza said, the government overseers of that nations system had sought to save money.Another speaker, Brenda Webb of St. Charles, gave a more recent account of what she said had been anattempt by doctor -- "who apparently believed in Obamacare" -- to discourage treatment for her ailing 88-year-oldmother.Weber asserted that a strong Missouri vote in favor of Proposition C could be "the domino that prompts otherstates to take similar action against the federal health care changes. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  32. 32. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 32 of 55Health Care Ballot Issue Stoking PredictedVoter Turnout (Jefferson City, MO) -- About one million voters are forecast to cast ballots in Tuesday nights statewideprimaries, according to data complied by the secretary of state.Secretary of State Robin Carnahans office estimated about 24 percent of registered voters in the state will go tothe polls Aug. 3. The figure comes from data collected from county clerks and election authorities in each county.Figures on estimated turnout run from 10 percent in Kansas City to 85 percent in Lafayette County.A number of spirited local races appear to be peaking voters interest, but the ballot issue gauging voter supportof the nationwide health care plan likely is stoking turnout numbers, said Laura Egerdal, a Carnahanspokesperson."History shows, that when there is a ballot issue with wide interest, turnout numbers will be higher than otheryears," Egerdal said.She points to 2008, when both the Republican and Democratic parties had gubernatorial primary elections,turnout was 17.97 percent.In 2004, when there were gubernatorial primaries plus the so-called gay marriage ban ballot issue, turnout was34.72 percent.And in 2002, when there was a gas tax hike for transportation on the ballot, turnout was 25.2 percent.Voter turnout during non-presidential years is typically much lower. During the 2008 presidential election, morethan 2.8 million Missourians cast their vote.Egerdal encouraged voters to check this website before heading to the polls.http://www.govotemissouri.comThe site, coordinated by the Secretary of States office, provides voters with the address of their polling station,as well as a sample ballot, and information about what types of identification to bring to the polls.Polling places will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  33. 33. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 33 of 55Primary is key in many Missouri SenatedistrictsBy Jo Mannies, Beacon staffPOSTED 12:28 PM WED., 07.28.10The people may change, but not the political parties. For the most part, thats the backdrop for this yearsMissouri Senate contests.Statewide, half of the Senates 34 seats are on this years ballots. But most of those seats have largely becomelocks for one party or the other. As a result, theres little chance this year that Missouri Democrats will makemuch of a dent in their minority status, or that the GOP will add much to its already considerable majority.Republicans control 23 -- or 67.6 percent -- of the chambers 34 seats. Democrats hold only 11 seats, theirsmallest share of the Senate in more than 60 years.But the polarization in many of those districts also means that Tuesdays primary elections are key. In manycases, the victor in the regions contested party primaries for the state Senate will have no serious opposition inNovember.The region has four major Senate primary fights -- two involving Democrats (Districts 14 and 24) and two withRepublicans (Districts 2 and 26). Only one, the 24th, is seen as a true swing district.Heres a snap shot of the candidates and the issues in each of the four:DISTRICT 2As state Rep. Cynthia Davis sees it, Sen. Scott Rupp, R-Wentzville, is simply not a true conservative. So Davis,R-OFallon, is challenging Rupps bid for re-election in the GOP-leaning district.Rupp sees Davis as a self-promoter whose record in the House doesnt come close to matching his.Rupp, 36, is a banker on good political terms with many of the states top Republicans. His campaign has raisedand spent about four times as much as Davis. Scott Rupp and Cynthia Davis Davis, 50, is the mother of seven children, co-owner (with her husband) of a Christian bookstore and somewhat of a political renegade. Davis has attracted national attention over such efforts as her bill to make it more difficult for Missourians to divorce , her avid opposition to abortion and her 2009 criticism of federalsummer food programs for low-income children. Davis asserted that "hunger can be a positive motivator."Rupp cites his roles in passing the 2008 law that gives the Missouri Highway Patrol the power to check theresidency status of anyone headed for jail, in helping to craft state budgets during tight economic times and ingetting Proposition C -- which seeks to block enactment in Missouri of the new federal health-care mandates --through the state Senate and onto Tuesdays ballot.Rupp also disputes Davis assertion that he hasnt been active enough against abortion. Missouri Right to Life,the states largest anti-abortion group, has endorsed Davis. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  34. 34. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 34 of 55Both also are tangling over guns. The National Rifle Association has endorsed Rupps re-election, but it also hasgiven Davis its top "A" rating. Her latest campaign flier asserts that shes the only candidate with a concealed-weapon permit.Davis ran into trouble with the Missouri Ethics Commission a few years ago, and paid a fine, after the stateDemocratic Party filed a formal complaint alleging that that she improperly used campaign money for personalexpenses. Another similiar complaint recently was filed against Davis, who contends the newest case ispolitically motivated.Her campaign says it has, in turn, filed ethics complaints against Rupp. He says he has yet to be notified by theEthics Commission that any complaints have been filed, which Rupp asserts is a signal that Davis alleged actionwas motivated by politics, not facts.DISTRICT 14Four Democrats -- three of them legislators and one a former mayor -- are battling over the post being vacatedby state Sen. Rita Days, D-Bel Nor, who must retire because of term limits. Because no other party is fielding acandidate, the Democrat who wins Tuesday is guaranteed to get the seat. Days is remaining neutral.State Rep. Ted Hoskins, D-Berkeley, is a businessman and former mayor of Berkeley who is completing the lastof four terms in the Missouri House. He has won praise and criticism over his amiable ties with HouseRepublicans, whove controlled the chamber since 2003. In 2009, he was the only Democrat named to head aHouse committee. Clockwise from upper left: Ted Hoskins, Maria Chappelle-Nadal, Joe Adam, Don Calloway State Rep. Don Calloway, D-Bel Nor, is a lawyer and just completing his first term in the state House . Over the past year, hes attracted a lot of attention over his opposition to the embattled leadership running the Northeast Ambulance and Fire Protection District. Calloway has joined in a successful legal fight to challenge the finances of the district. Calloway and Hoskins each have received significant financial support -- $30,000 apiece -- from Progress for the Saint Louis Region, a new campaign committee that initially is being bankrolled by wealthy financier/philanthropist Rex Sinquefield. Both candidates have said they share Sinquefields desire for more educational options for students who live infailing districts. That support also has touched off concern among Sinquefields school-choice critics.State Rep. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D- University City, is completing her third term in the state House. Her firstbid for office in 2004 caught the attention of then-presidential contender Howard Dean, who later namedChappelle-Nadal as one of Missouris superdelegates to the 2008 Democratic presidential convention. She waschosen by the State Department last winter to travel to Iraq as part of a contingent of eight women electedofficials to serve as election observers for Iraqs March 7 election.Chappelle-Nadal angered some state Democratic leaders in 2008 when she participated in a robo-call to aidRepublican Mike Gibbons, then running for Missouri attorney general. Chappelle-Nadal also has run afoul ofthe regions main gay-rights group , PROMO, over public disclosure of her Tweets referring to the sexualorientation of Terry Crow, a University City councilman who is gay and made an unsuccessful bid for mayor. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  35. 35. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 35 of 55Former University Mayor Joe Adams has been touting his executive experience ever since he left office in thespring and launched his state Senate bid. Adams is a former president of the St. Louis County MunicipalLeague and of the Missouri Municipal League.He has been endorsed by state Sen. Joan Bray , D-University City, former state Sen. Wayne Goode, andthe 14h Districts Democratic township committeepeople. But Adams also has been less successful at raisingcampaign money than his rivals, in part because he has not attracted large donors like his Democratic rivals.Adams allies say thats evidence that he will be more independent; his rivals disagree.District 24Former state Reps. Sam Page and Barbara Fraser have been locked in a Democratic battle for months for theirpartys nomination to succeed Bray, who must retire because of term limits.Both are emphasizing their previous legislative experience and their political ties. Bray is backing Fraser ,while Page has the support of U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay , D-St. Louis. An earlier rival, state Rep. MikeCorcoran, has endorsed Page since dropping out.Fraser is a former history teacher and former member of the University City School Board. After serving eightyears in the state House, Fraser won election in 2006 to the St. Louis County Council. She currently is councilpresident. Sam Page and Barbara Fraser Page is a physician who served on the Creve Coeur City Council before he was elected to the state House in 2002. In 2008, he was the Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor, losing to Republican incumbent Peter Kinder. Both candidates emphasize their support for public education, making college affordable and the need for the state and theregion to encourage economic growth. Both say they know how to work with Republicans.Page also focuses on health care, saying, "I have led the charge to expand access."Page cites his opposition to the Legislatures 2005 cuts to the states Medicaid rolls and, since leaving theHouse, his support for the unsuccessful effort by Gov. Jay Nixon and the states hospitals in 2009 to expandcoverage by using larger fees by the hospitals to match more federal Medicaid dollars.Fraser says her service in the House and the County Council "sets me apart" and give her stronger insight intothe regions problems.In the House, Fraser particularly focused on childrens issues. On the council, she "led the way with the smokingban that county voters approved overwhelmingly last year.Although Page has raised more campaign money, the two have had similar budgets over the last six weeks ofthe campaign. And the tone of their contest has gotten more combative, with each challenging the otherseffectiveness and energy.Also in the Democratic primary is Helen Steele Burton, who has not actively campaigned.The victor will face Republican John Lamping, a first-time candidate who has amassed a hefty war chest whilehe has watched the two Democrats fight it out.DISTRICT 26Arguably the regions highest-profile, and nastiest, state Senate fight has been among three Republicans dukingit out to succeed state Sen. John Griesheimer, who like Bray and Days must retire because of term limits. News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
  36. 36. MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS D AILY N EWS C LIPS C o l l e c t e d / A r c h i v e d f o r T h u r s d a y , J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 1 0 -- Page 36 of 55The three chief contenders -- state Rep. Brian Nieves, former state Rep. Jack Jackson and former Washington,Mo., mayor Richard Stratman -- are competing with campaign mailers, TV and radio ads. (Also in the race isDonald Meyer of Labadie, who not actively campaigned.)Nieves and Jackson also admit campaigning on their regular radio shows.The key issues: Whos the most conservative and who can be more effective?Stratman has the backing of Griesheimer and some other major Republicans. Nieves is popular with the TeaParty crowd. Jackson, a veteran, has strong ties to veterans groups. From left: Richard Stratman, Brian Nieves, Jack Jackson During the final week, Stratmans campaign is running robo-calls that feature his pregnant adult daughter, who emphasizes her fathers opposition to abortion.(Click here to view Stratmans TV ad.)Stratman also has been attacking Nieves record, accusing him of casting votes in favor of legislative pay raises.Nieves denies ever voting for House pay hikes, and has launched robo-calls that accuse Stratman of lying.Stratman criticizes Nieves and other GOP legislators for using federal stimulus money to balance the statebudget. He says the money should have been used for construction projects or given back to the federalgovernment.Jackson, meanwhile, has fired off statements this week highlighting his promise that, if elected, hell call for statesenators "to take a morals and ethics pledge.""If you are always worried about someone finding skeletons in your closet then you cant be working as hard asyou can to find ways to revive the economy and bring back good jobs." Jackson said. "My commitment to ethicsalso includes my strong refusal to use negative political tactics."Meanwhile, 24th District residents and political activists are reporting the circulation and mailing of letters thatmake salacious accusations against Nieves. Stratman and Jackson deny any involvement or knowledge of theletters or their assertions.On Tuesday, Nieves called the letters "last-minute, desperate moves by his opposition, and has decried suchtactics on his daily radio show . News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom

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