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Maintain Our Libraries' Relevancy in the 21st Century

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  • 1. Maintaining Our Libraries’ Relevancy in the 21 st Century Information Literacy Trends in the Sciences Andrew Wick Klein May 8, 2006
  • 2. The Situation
    • Changing landscape of information
    • Emerging delivery methods: wikis, blogs, RSS
    • New tools: Google Scholar, competitors
    • Online journals, open access
  • 3. The Situation
    • Generation Y / Millennial Generation
    • Changing profile of “college student”
    • Faculty and teaching
    • Libraries
  • 4. We Ask Ourselves…
    • Keep up-to-date?
    • Prepare for the future?
    • Best way to reach our users?
    • Support the educational mission?
    • Stay relevant?
    • Information Literacy
  • 5. Information Literacy
    • The set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information
    • Learning how to learn
    • Increasingly important in the Information Age
    • Essential to producing life-long learners
  • 6. IL versus BI
    • BI: one-shot sessions, specific assignments, no followup
    • Bigger and broader:
      • Information needs on a global level
      • Throughout the entire process
      • Outside the classroom
      • General and specific
  • 7. Standards
    • 2000: ACRL publishes Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education
    • Supporting documents
    • Draft: Standards for Science & Technology Libraries
  • 8. Successes
    • Wide acceptance, praise for standards
    • Voluminous literature on IL strategies, programs and tips
    • Professional support: Instruction Section, conferences, discussion lists
  • 9. Problems
    • Lack of support – financial, personnel, teaching venues
    • Resistance and “inertia” from faculty
    • Lack of understanding that IL is a mainstream educational issue rather than just library-centric
    • Is it working? Lack of assessment
  • 10. Implementation Effective Assessment Collaboration With Faculty Curriculum Integration Outcome- specific Discipline- specific Information Literacy
  • 11. 1. Discipline-specific
    • Standards strike a balance between generality and discipline specificity
    • IL in isolation loses relevance
    • Context emphasizes importance
    • User need is paramount
    • User need is discipline-specific
  • 12. 2. Outcome-specific
    • Emphasized in Standards
    • Outcomes themselves can vary from general to specific
    • Good educational theory: backward design
    • Essential to assessment
  • 13. 3. Curriculum integration
    • IL skills are science skills
    • Necessary for standardization across department
    • Important for faculty collaboration
    • User needs vary with program
  • 14. 4. Collaboration with faculty
    • Foster good relationships: listening, asking rather than telling, suggesting
    • Work with representative group
    • Partners working towards same educational goal – we’re here to help!
    • User needs!
  • 15. 5. Effective Assessment
    • Focused on desired outcomes
    • Also learning environment and IL program components
    • Formal and informal
    • Ongoing and integrated into design of IL program
  • 16. Questions?
  • 17. I Am Preaching to the Choir or IL at Cal State Northridge
    • Mission, goals: “information competence” is clear priority
    • Information Competence Initiative: grants, resources
    • CSUN Assessment plan: IL is 1 of 3
    • ICT Literacy Assessment Initiative with EST
  • 18. Room for Improvement
    • Trends that aren’t going away:
    • Relevance of IL to science curricula
    • Value of discipline-specific programs
    • Need for faculty support
    • Importance of effective assessment
  • 19. Bibliography ACRL website on Information Literacy. http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlissues/acrlinfolit/informationliteracy.htm (Accessed May 5, 2006). Badke, William. “Can’t Get No Respect: Helping Faculty to Understand the Educational Power of Information Literacy.” The Reference Librarian , 89/90 (2005), pp. 63-80. Galvin, Jeanne. “Alternative Strategies for Promoting Information Literacy.” The Journal of Academic Librarianship , 31 (2005), pp. 352-357. Gardner, Susan. “What Students Want: Generation Y and the Changing Function of the Academic Library.” portal: Libraries and the Academy , 5 (2005), pp. 405-420. Gilson, Caroline. Personal correspondence. Hebb, Tiffany. Personal correspondence. “ Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.” Chicago: Association of College & Research Libraries (2000).
  • 20. Bibliography Lindauer, Bonnie G. “The Three Arenas of Information Literacy Assessment.” Reference & User Services Quarterly , 44 (2004), pp. 122-129. Manuel, Kate. “Generic and Discipline-Specific Information Literacy Competencies: The Case for the Sciences.” Science & Technology Libraries , 24 (2004), pp. 279-308. Rockman, Ilene. “Integrating information literacy into the learning outcomes of academic disciplines.” College & Research Libraries News , 64 (2003), pp. 612-615. Smith, Eleanor M. “Developing an Information Literacy Curriculum for the Sciences.” Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship , 37 (Spring 2003). Winterman, Brian. Personal correspondence.
  • 21. Thank you!

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