WIA 2010 Awards - Keynote Speaker Trevor Hill, Global Water
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WIA 2010 Awards - Keynote Speaker Trevor Hill, Global Water

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Trevor Hill of Global Water gave the keynote speech at the 2010 Water Industry Alliance Awards.

Trevor Hill of Global Water gave the keynote speech at the 2010 Water Industry Alliance Awards.

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WIA 2010 Awards - Keynote Speaker Trevor Hill, Global Water WIA 2010 Awards - Keynote Speaker Trevor Hill, Global Water Presentation Transcript

  • 2010 Water Industry Alliance Awards Keynote Speaker Trevor Hill Global Water
  • The City of the Future Future Trends for Managing Arid Cities Trevor Hill, P.Eng. President & CEO Global Water
  • Partners in Managing Scarcity
  • Partners in Managing Scarcity
  • Partners for Water Sustainability •  In Arizona, cities “function like space stations, importing every ounce of fresh water from distant rivers or fossil aquifers.” •  “In arid places…physics amplify evaporation and drought, visible in the dust-dry farms of the Murray-Darling River Basin in Australia. Source: Barbara Kingsolver, “Water Is Life”, National Geographic, “Water Our Thirsty World”, April 2010
  • Partners for Water Sustainability “As the state struggles to match water supplies with its booming population and ensure reliable water delivery to future generations, the Commission will need to expand its efforts at conservation into uncharted areas.” Chairman Kristen Mayes, Arizona Corporation Commission “The water industry in South Australia is changing quite rapidly – so the governance and institutional arrangements supporting the industry also need to change,…it will mean South Australia can take a holistic and integrated approach to water management for the very first time.” Commissioner for Water Security, Robyn McLeod
  • Water Scarcity Sources: World Resources Institute (2003) and Global Water Intelligence (11 Feb 2010)
  • Water Scarcity Sources: World Resources Institute (2003) and Global Water Intelligence (11 Feb 2010)
  • Water Scarcity [The]“water crisis” is really about the political realization in many parts of the world that we cannot continue to live as if water availability were not a restraint on our activities. It is a bit like coming to terms with the fact that Santa Claus does not exist. For years, politicians and engineers have worked to create the illusion that abundant water is part of nature’s bounty, wherever in the world it is required. It was easier to maintain the pretence of plentiful water in the past. The illusion is becoming much more difficult to maintain. Sources: World Resources Institute (2003) and Global Water Intelligence (11 Feb 2010)
  • Arid City of the Future Source: The World Bank, “Making the Most of Scarcity - Accountability for Better Water Management Results in the Middle East and North Africa”, 2007
  • Source: UN FAO (http://www.fao.org/nr/water/art/2008/wateruse.htm) and UN “World at Six Billion”
  • By 2025, 1.8 billion of the world’s projected 8.9 billion people will be living in countries or regions that are experiencing “absolute water scarcity”, and two-thirds of the world population could be under conditions of water stress Source: UN FAO (http://www.fao.org/nr/water/art/2008/wateruse.htm) and UN “World at Six Billion”
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply Side Management - Reservoirs
  • Supply-Side Management - Desalination •  Saudi Arabia uses 1.5 million barrels of oil per day at its desalination plants. 730 gallons of fuel per second. It takes 1850 gallons of water to refine this fuel from crude oil. Source: Arab News
  • Supply-Side Management - Desalination •  Saudi Arabia uses 1.5 million barrels of oil per day at its desalination plants. 730 gallons of fuel per second. It takes 1850 gallons of water to refine this fuel from crude oil. Source: Arab News
  • Shifting the Paradigm: The Arid City Water Cycle Total Water Management
  • Shifting the Paradigm: The Arid City Water Cycle Total Water Management •  TWM •  Centralized/Decentralized •  Integrated utilities •  Infrastructure •  Purple Pipe (Dual Reticulation) •  ASR/ASTR •  DSM •  Data •  Price Signals •  Customer Feedback
  • Infrastructure – Dual Reticulation
  • Infrastructure – Decentralized
  • Infrastructure – ASR/ASTR Arizona has a rich history in managed aquifer recharge to counteract the overdraft of groundwater sources, and to “bank” its surface water allocation Arizona has a world-class groundwater management plan backed by Statute Many Az utilities employ: Recharge Basins Vadose Zone Injection Wells ASR (deep injection) Environmental allotment – requires accounting of ET losses and maintains a 5% “cut to the aquifer” Hassayampa River Recharge Project
  • Infrastructure – ASR/ASTR Global Water: The Global Water Hassayampa River Recharge Project pioneered “in-basin” recharge. Transports water from the CAP west of Phoenix to the Hassayampa River Basin, where it percolates to the aquifer Recharged approximated 10,000 AF in 2007, 20,000 AF in 2008, and 23,000 AF in 2009 Hassayampa River Recharge Project
  • ASR/ASTR •  Aquifer Storage & Recovery, Aquifer Storage Transfer & Recovery •  Two available water sources: •  Storm water run-off •  Reclaimed water discharged currently from wastewater operations •  Collect, treat and recharge underground both supplies •  Develop long term water availability •  Recover, treat and distribute to non-potable uses •  Duplex complementary upsides: •  Long term growth of value of water rights •  retail distribution sales Renewable water recovery Storm-water Renewable water treatment & treatment, short term recharge Underground storage and distribution Reclaimed feed Storage & recharge
  • Utility-Scale Conservation Demand-Side Management Real conservation requires: • Data • Information • Education
  • Information = Conservation Source: AquaSpy
  • Price Signals = Conservation Source: Brett Walton “The Price of Water: A Comparison of Water Rates, Usage in 30 U.S. Cities”, April 26, 2010, Circle of Blue Source: Oliver M Brandes et al, “Worth Every Penny: A Primer on Conservation-Oriented Water Pricing”, POLIS Water Sustainability Project, May 2010
  • Price Signals = Conservation Source: Brett Walton “The Price of Water: A Comparison of Water Rates, Usage in 30 U.S. Cities”, April 26, 2010, Circle of Blue Source: Oliver M Brandes et al, “Worth Every Penny: A Primer on Conservation-Oriented Water Pricing”, POLIS Water Sustainability Project, May 2010
  • Opportunities for Arid Regions to Collaborate •  Develop a new Paradigm for Sustainability •  Pool our resources to maximize water efficiency •  Provide access to markets for innovative technologies •  Provide Best in Class Technologies, Business Practices and Management Practices for Arid Regions •  Provide policy development aligned with resource development •  Provide opportunities to finance water reuse infrastructure and systems
  • Sustainability …not if we plan it right!
  • Get connected with the Water Industry Alliance visit www.waterindustry.com.au