Jeremy Kennedy - Partner<br />McCullough Robertson Lawyers<br />Dealing with Demonstrations and Protestors – Legal Risk + ...
2<br />Case example 2 – Port Waratah Coal Services<br />
3<br />Risk<br />Injury or death of protestor(s)<br />Injury or death of employee/contractor<br />Loss of production/cost<...
4<br />Risk - Legal responsibilities<br />Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000 (NSW)<br />duty of care to non-employees...
5<br />Risk - Legal responsibilities<br />Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (NSW)<br />duty of manger or controller of the w...
6<br />Response - Public order powers<br /><ul><li>Key legislation</li></ul>Law Enforcement (Powers and Responsibilities A...
7<br />Response - Public order power examples <br />Terrorism (Police Powers) Act 2002 (NSW)<br />a ‘terrorist act’ includ...
8<br />Response - Civil actions and remedies<br />
9<br />Case example 1 – Port Waratah Coal Services<br /><ul><li>Port Waratah Coal Services brought an action against 7 of ...
Sought compensation under s77B of the Victim’s Support and Rehabilitation Act 1996
Magistrate Elaine Truscott dismissed application for compensation
PWCS could not prove actual loss suffered and any money awarded was to be given to charity (not compensation)</li></li></u...
conduct resulted in potential breaches of OHS Act
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Dealing with Demonstartions &amp; Protestors- Legal Risk &amp; Response

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Legal Risks for mine and resources infrastructure owners and occupiers associated with Demonstrations and protestors- Legal options to deal with.

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Dealing with Demonstartions &amp; Protestors- Legal Risk &amp; Response

  1. 1. Jeremy Kennedy - Partner<br />McCullough Robertson Lawyers<br />Dealing with Demonstrations and Protestors – Legal Risk + Response<br />26 July 2011<br />12:15pm – 12:35pm<br />1<br />
  2. 2. 2<br />Case example 2 – Port Waratah Coal Services<br />
  3. 3. 3<br />Risk<br />Injury or death of protestor(s)<br />Injury or death of employee/contractor<br />Loss of production/cost<br />Reputational issues<br />Prosecution by regulators(?)<br />Civil claims <br />
  4. 4. 4<br />Risk - Legal responsibilities<br />Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000 (NSW)<br />duty of care to non-employees – Section 8(2)<br />must ensure people (other than employees) are not exposed to risks to their health and safety<br />duty to trespassers? <br />duties of controllers of work premises – Section 10 <br />
  5. 5. 5<br />Risk - Legal responsibilities<br />Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (NSW)<br />duty of manger or controller of the workplace to ensure health and safety of any person (so far as reasonably practicable) – Section 20 <br />duties of other persons at the workplace to take reasonable care for own health and safety – Section 29 <br />Common law duties of care owed by owners and occupiers <br />
  6. 6. 6<br />Response - Public order powers<br /><ul><li>Key legislation</li></ul>Law Enforcement (Powers and Responsibilities Act) 2002 (NSW)<br />Terrorism (Police Powers) Act 2002 (NSW)<br />Inclosed Lands Protection Act 1901 (NSW)<br />Major Events Act 2009 (NSW)<br />Crimes (Criminal Organisation Control) Act 2009 (NSW)<br />Defence Act 1903 (Cth)<br />
  7. 7. 7<br />Response - Public order power examples <br />Terrorism (Police Powers) Act 2002 (NSW)<br />a ‘terrorist act’ includes advocacy, protest, dissent or industrial action done with the intention of advancing a political, religious or ideological cause and with intent of intimidating the public or a section of the public or government – Section 3 <br />police authorised to exercise special powers <br />Inclosed Lands Protection Act 1901 (NSW)<br />special protections for ‘inclosed lands’ <br />offence to enter enclosed land without the consent of the owner or occupier of the land – Section 4<br />
  8. 8. 8<br />Response - Civil actions and remedies<br />
  9. 9. 9<br />Case example 1 – Port Waratah Coal Services<br /><ul><li>Port Waratah Coal Services brought an action against 7 of the Rising Tide activists for $525,000 in victims compensation
  10. 10. Sought compensation under s77B of the Victim’s Support and Rehabilitation Act 1996
  11. 11. Magistrate Elaine Truscott dismissed application for compensation
  12. 12. PWCS could not prove actual loss suffered and any money awarded was to be given to charity (not compensation)</li></li></ul><li>10<br />Case example 2 – Newcastle Coal Infrastructure Group<br /><ul><li>protestors from ‘Rising Tide’ activist group entered the NCIGKooragang Island export coal terminal site on 26 September 2010
  13. 13. conduct resulted in potential breaches of OHS Act
  14. 14. possible civil actions against protestors included the torts of interference with contractual relationships, intimidation, nuisance and trespass
  15. 15. breached Inclosed Lands Protection Act 1901 (NSW) and other relevant acts</li></li></ul><li>11<br />Case example 3 – Macquarie Generation <br /><ul><li>Two activists from Camp for Climate Action 2010 chained themselves to a conveyor belt on land belonging to Macquarie Generation
  16. 16. The conveyor belt transported coal to the Bayswater power station
  17. 17. The activists were removed by police rescue and charged with trespass </li></li></ul><li>12<br />Practical strategies to limit risks<br /><ul><li>Warn trespassers of hazards and risks
  18. 18. ‘Soft approach’ or ‘hard approach’
  19. 19. Soft approach:
  20. 20. engage with protestors
  21. 21. engage with police
  22. 22. develop a plan
  23. 23. Hard approach
  24. 24. pre-emptory legal action
  25. 25. post protest legal action – set an example</li></li></ul><li>13<br />Contact details<br />Presenter: Jeremy Kennedy<br />Position: Partner<br />Direct line: 02 4924 8999<br />Email: jkennedy@mccullough.com.au<br />

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