S     A    F   UVG RVO  1
JOINING SENTENCES ALTERNATIVES TO “IF”LOOK AT THESEHere are some sentences from recent newspapers:1)   Had the politician ...
JOINING SENTENCES                       USING PARTICIPLESYou might already have seen this example:                Ben won ...
TASKCopy the same construction in the following sentences by filling in the blanks. Copythe sentences out in full. Most of...
You need to check that you can make these participles before you can build sentenceswhich use them. You’ll find that you d...
JOINING SENTENCES (ONE)                         Week 4                     AVOIDING “AND”This work is aimed at improving y...
Sentence 3Sam liked History and decided to study it at G.C.S.E.Becomes; Because he _______________________________, Sam___...
Week 5                  JOINING SENTENCES                       CONJUNCTIONThe most common (and so unimpressive) conjuncti...
JOINING SENTENCES (THREE)                                     Week 5                             AVOIDING “BUT”Just as BOR...
COMMON ERRORS                                    Week 6    Can you sniff out the error in each of these sentences?    Wr...
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Year 7 Homework Booklet 3

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Year 7 Homework Booklet 3

  1. 1. S A F UVG RVO 1
  2. 2. JOINING SENTENCES ALTERNATIVES TO “IF”LOOK AT THESEHere are some sentences from recent newspapers:1) Had the politician been offered a job, he would have accepted it.2) Had Jessica Smith not divorced Lord Timpson two years ago, she would now be Lady Timpson.3) Should any of our readers be able to help, they can write to this address.The writers of theses sentences have chosen to avoid using “if.” Canyou prove this by re-writing each one using “if”? There is nothingwrong with “if” but you might want a change or to show that you canhandle this construction.Notice: “had” will be used if it is in the past. “should” will be used for the present or future.TASKChange these sentences, reworking them to remove “if.” Use theones above as examples. Some help is given at first.1) If you had been here on time, this would not have happened.Becomes: Had you been____________________________.2) If any Year 10 student’s are interested in helping with the children’s party, they should see Mr. Weston at break.Becomes: Should any Year 10_______________________.3) If Michael had not phoned the police when he did, the situation would have been much worse.4) If Eddie Carter had auditioned for the lead part in the play, he would have got it.5) If the victim had seen the robber more clearly, he could have given the police a better description.6) If you should want to picnic in the park before the concert, the gates will be open at four o’clock. 2
  3. 3. JOINING SENTENCES USING PARTICIPLESYou might already have seen this example: Ben won the race and he was given a medal.To remove boring, old “and”, these were suggested: Having won the race, Ben was given a medal. After winning the race, Ben was given a medal.These sentences have been made by changing the verb from “won” to “having won” and to “winning.”This is a very useful way to build sentences when you have:a) two things happening at the same time. e.g Walking through the park, Jack saw a badger.b) one thing happening after another. e.g. Having walked through the park, Jack went to the shops.As it is quite a sophisticated and clever construction, it is worth taking some time tounderstand it.LOOK AT THESESentence: Phil was playing his best tennis for several years and he knew that he had achance of winning the tournament.Becomes: Playing his best tennis for several years, Phil knew that he had a chance ofwinning the tournament.Sentence: Claire was sipping a cocktail near the golden beach and turquoise sea. Shethought that this was the best holiday she had ever had.Becomes: Sipping a cocktail near the golden beach and turquoise sea, Claire thoughtthat this was the best holiday she had ever had. 3
  4. 4. TASKCopy the same construction in the following sentences by filling in the blanks. Copythe sentences out in full. Most of them have been started for you.Sentence: The police were clearing the streets after the worst riot for years. Theyfound thousands of pounds’ worth of damage.Becomes: Clearing the _______________________________________, the policefound___________________________________ of damage.Sentence: My brother has applied for a very exciting job at the B.B.C. He is nowspending his time doing research ready for his interview.Becomes: Having applied for __________________________________, my brotheris now _________________________________his interview.Sentence: Victorian children were raised by their parents or nannies very strictly.They had to obey the rule that they should be seen and not heard.Becomes: Raised by their ________________________________ strictly, Victorianchildren______________________________________ not heard.In all the above sentences, the new form of the verb has been put in italics. They areparts of the verb and so are called participles. Without realising it, you have beenusing participles to make these sentences!There are two participles for every verb: 1) present participles. These are very easy as they always end in “____ing.” Above, there were: playing sipping clearing 2) past participles. These are a little more tricky because there are many different ones. Above, there were: applied raised 4
  5. 5. You need to check that you can make these participles before you can build sentenceswhich use them. You’ll find that you do know most of them!TASK. Complete the following columns.The way to make a present participle is to put “I am” in front of it.The way to make a past participle is to put “I have” in front of it. The first ones havebeen done for you.VERB PRESENT PARTICIPLE PAST PARTICIPLEfly flying flownswim swimming swumride riding rodewritesitbringforgetbuydivelie (down)lay (a carpet)paysneakprovegetspeakgobreakdrinksaycatchrisesingdoshakebegin 5
  6. 6. JOINING SENTENCES (ONE) Week 4 AVOIDING “AND”This work is aimed at improving your writing skills and your marks byhelping you to make varied and interesting sentences.LOOK AT THIS SENTENCE: Ben won the race and he was given a medal.REMEMBER: “and” is BORING. . .BORING. . .BORINGLOOK AT THESE Because he won the race, Ben was given a medal. Having won the race, Ben was given a medal. Ben, the winner of the race, was given a medal. After he won the race, Ben was given a medal. Ben, who won the race, was given a medal. After winning the race, Ben was given a medal. NOTICE ANYTHING? NOT ONE OF THEM USES BORING OLD “AND”!TASK Remove boring old “and” from the following sentences byfilling in the blanks. Use the sentences above as examples.Sentence 1J.K. Rowling is the author of the “Harry Potter” books and is amillionaire.Becomes; J.K. Rowling, the___________________________________________________________, is _______________________________.Sentence 2Sophie finished her homework and went to the cinema.Becomes; After finishing _________________________, Sophie________ _______________________. 6
  7. 7. Sentence 3Sam liked History and decided to study it at G.C.S.E.Becomes; Because he _______________________________, Sam________________________________________________ G.C.S.E.Sentence 4I was listening to the car radio on the way to school and I recognisedthe voice of a boy in my class.Becomes; Listening to __________________________________school,I recognised ___________________________________________class.Sentence 5Jo examined the problem closely for at least an hour and realised sheneeded the teacher’s help.Becomes; Having examined __________________________________hour, Jo ________________________________________________help.Sentence 6Adam left school on Friday and doesn’t start his new school inAustralia until January next year.Becomes; Adam, who ______________________________, doesn’t_____________________________________________________________________ year.Sentence 7I couldn’t find Miss Jackson at break to tell her about my Sciencehomework and so I waited for her at lunch.Becomes;As______________________________________________________homework,____________________________lunch.Sentence 8Emma was looking through the contents of an oldsuitcase in the loft and suddenly found something thatmade her gasp.Becomes; Looking _______________________________________loft,Emma___________________________________________________gasp. 7
  8. 8. Week 5 JOINING SENTENCES CONJUNCTIONThe most common (and so unimpressive) conjunctions are: and but becauseAlso badly over-used are: then soThese are still worse as they’re not even real conjunctions. Yoursentences will be more varied and interesting, improving your writingskills and your marks if you avoid over-using them by choosing others. THE RHYME BELOW CONTAINS SEVENTEEN CONJUNCTIONS. LEARN IT! USE THEM IN YOUR WRITING! AS, WHERE, UNTIL, ALTHOUGH, AFTER, BEFORE, SINCE, THOUGH, WHILE, WHEN, WHEREAS, YET, OR, WHETHER, UNLESS, IF, FOR.FOUR TIPS FOR LEARNING THE RHYME1) Lines one and two rhyme2) Lines three and four rhyme3) In the four lines, the number of words goes 4-4-5-4. 8
  9. 9. JOINING SENTENCES (THREE) Week 5 AVOIDING “BUT”Just as BORING BORING BORING as “AND” is “BUT.”Very often you can use one of these conjunctions instead: THOUGH ALTHOUGH WHEREAS YETLOOK AT THESE. THE WORD “BUT” HAS BEEN REPLACED WITH AMORE INTERESTING CONJUNCTION. although1) Tom likes running but he knows that he isn’t very fast. whereas2) Simon is extremely tall but his brother James is quite short. yet3) Rachel’s mother hates hockey but she always goes to the matches to support her daughter. though4) The students started the work in the lesson but the teacher knew that they would not finish it.TASKRemove boring old “but” from the following sentences by replacing itwith one of the four conjunctions above. Try to use all four.1) The tennis player knew that he could not win but he was determined to do his best.2) My mother likes cats but my father prefers dogs.3) I liked the poem but I found it difficult to understand.4) Laura volunteered to help at the charity children’s party but she already had too many things to do that day.5) Mrs. Barnett always drives to the shops but her fitness-fanatic husband usually chooses to jog.6) Many people would have given up after failing the driving test ten times but David kept at it. 9
  10. 10. COMMON ERRORS Week 6  Can you sniff out the error in each of these sentences?  Write these out as they should be written. Underline the part you have changed.1. They like football alot.2. John is hi’s friend.3. Hi shouted Jane.4. The pea’s were delicious.5. “Be quite,” said the teacher.6. I live just passed the supermarket.7. Whose that woman over there?8. £500 is to expensive, I think.9. We never go nowhere in winter.10. Lucy said she seen the thieves running away.11. I’m not sure weather to go or not.12. They cooked the meal theirselves.13. Do you like swimming14. The cat licked it’s lips.15. Tim writes very quick.When you have checked your answer, make sure you learn the correct version – and don’t repeat any mistakes! 10

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